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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988 | PATT MORRISON and ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writers
They arose early and got themselves all decked out: she in a midcalf dress of some soft beige, he in a jacket and tie--the first tie Scott Roston's roommate had ever seen him wear. Scott Roston and Karen Waltz raced to Las Vegas on Feb. 4 in his leased red Toyota two-seater and were wed in a $25 civil ceremony in a marriage commissioner's office enlivened by some blue and white artificial flowers. Then they raced back to Santa Monica.
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NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Forget Big Brother. What we have to fear now is Peeping Tom. One of Britain's intelligence services, with help from the U.S. National Security Agency, reportedly collected and stored millions of images from people's Yahoo webcam chats.   The Guardian newspaper, continuing to mine the Edward Snowden mother lode of purloined NSA documents, broke the news Thursday about the British spy agency GCHQ's “Optic Nerve” program. It reported : “GCHQ files dating between 2008 and 2010 explicitly state that a surveillance program codenamed Optic Nerve collected still images of Yahoo webcam chats in bulk and saved them to agency databases, regardless of whether individual users were an intelligence target or not. “In one six-month period in 2008 alone, the agency collected webcam imagery - including substantial quantities of sexually explicit communications - from more than 1.8 million Yahoo user accounts globally.” Or, as President Obama might say: “Just keeping the world safe from naked, sex-crazed terrorists; nothing else to see here; move along.” Or, as some working stiff at the GCHQ /NSA might say: “Hubba hubba, isn't that my neighbor in 4B?
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WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania -- President Obama said Monday that national security officials are evaluating a report published this weekend claiming that the United States spied on its allies at the European Union, even as he dismissed espionage among friends as commonplace. “I guarantee you that in European capitals, there are people who are interested in, if not what I had for breakfast, at least what my talking points might be should I end up meeting with their leaders,” Obama said at a news conference shortly after arriving for a state visit to this East African nation.
WORLD
November 3, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- While reports of the extent of the NSA's eavesdropping on world leaders and millions of allied citizens caused fierce indignation worldwide last month, Israel mostly shrugged. The U.S. also listens in on Israel, former Mossad chief Danny Yatom recently  told Israeli media , and columnist  Amir Oren wrote  that Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been a "U.S. intelligence target since the 1980s. " Some Israeli observers saw the indignation as naive .  According to excerpts (Hebrew website, video includes some English)
BOOKS
September 10, 2000 | ANDREW COCKBURN, Andrew Cockburn is the co-author of "Out of the Ashes: The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein."
There has long been a tradition at Oxford--it was certainly going strong in my day in the late '60s--in which certain tutors would discreetly suggest to select students that they "might care to have a word with a few fellows from the Foreign Office." Thus were Britain's future spooks recruited for the fabled MI6. Sebastian, a friend of mine tapped in this manner, was an obvious choice: brilliant, fluent in several languages, socially well-connected and, or rather but, flamboyantly gay.
NATIONAL
June 5, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The FBI pressed ahead Friday with plans to restructure its intelligence operations, even as the announced departure of CIA Director George J. Tenet stirred debate over the future shape of the nation's intelligence agencies. Bureau officials offered up details of a proposed intelligence service within the FBI, a "directorate of intelligence" that would have budget authority over FBI intelligence assets and programs.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Driven in part by the global financial crisis, foreign intelligence services, corporations and computer hackers have stepped up efforts to steal technology and trade secrets from American companies, the FBI's top spy hunter told Congress on Thursday. A related threat - illegal sales of U.S. technology - was highlighted when a major military contractor, United Technologies Corp., and two subsidiary units agreed in federal court to pay a $75-million fine for illegally selling embargoed software and components to China that the country used to build a sophisticated attack helicopter called the Z-10.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2002 | JIM KRANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For Americans who travel abroad, the world looks like a more menacing place. Since Sept. 11, a swarm of travel intelligence services and executive tracking programs have emerged, capitalizing on the fear of things foreign. Most aim to inform business junketeers about the potential for disease, delays and danger. Business, they say, has been vigorous. "We're adding double the number of clients per month than we were before Sept.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal authorities have charged a former Navy intelligence agent with having fake credentials from the White House, CIA and National Security Council. Craig Sikut, 47, of Amherst, faces felony charges of making a false statement and producing false identification cards. The FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office said police investigated a disturbance at his suburban Buffalo home and found the fake IDs and a computer with thousands of images of President Bush.
NEWS
September 14, 1988
Cuba blamed British and U.S. intelligence services for a shooting incident that prompted Britain to expel the Cuban ambassador and an attache. Ambassador Oscar Fernandez-Mell and his commercial attache, Carlos Manuel Medina Perez, left the country after Medina Perez was accused of firing shots at a group of people outside his London home. But the Cuban Embassy claimed that the attache had actually opened fire on a CIA operative who tried to get him to defect.
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Kim Willsher
PARIS -- France says it has evidence gathered by its intelligence services to prove "undeniably" that Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces carried out a "massive and coordinated" chemical attack on its civilian population. The French government released the evidence in a nine-page declassified document Monday evening to boost its calls for military intervention in Syria. The report in many ways dovetails with allegations made by U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry. French President Francois Hollande has been a strong supporter of U.S. calls for a military response to the alleged chemical attack on the outskirts of Damascus on Aug. 21, and has rejected calls for a parliamentary vote on French participation.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams and Paul Richter
Russia's decision to grant temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden is “insignificant” and won't negatively influence U.S.-Russian relations, an aide to President Vladimir Putin insisted shortly after the American fugitive was allowed to enter the country. The assurance of business as usual between the former superpowers that was blithely offered by Kremlin aide Yuri Ushakov seemed to suggest that some back-channel agreement was in place between Moscow and Washington to downplay Snowden's departure from Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport, where he had been trapped in a diplomatic limbo since June 23. But officials at the White House and State Department were reportedly angered by Moscow's sudden move to give shelter to Snowden.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON  - Europe turned up the pressure on the Obama administration Monday to respond to new allegations that the U.S. bugged the embassies of some of its long-standing allies and eavesdropped on European Union diplomats around the world. Leaders and officials of EU countries said that, if true, the reports of American spying on friendly nations were unacceptable and potentially damaging to relations across the Atlantic and to joint endeavors such as upcoming talks on a U.S.-EU free trade pact.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania -- President Obama said Monday that national security officials are evaluating a report published this weekend claiming that the United States spied on its allies at the European Union, even as he dismissed espionage among friends as commonplace. “I guarantee you that in European capitals, there are people who are interested in, if not what I had for breakfast, at least what my talking points might be should I end up meeting with their leaders,” Obama said at a news conference shortly after arriving for a state visit to this East African nation.
WORLD
June 10, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- British Foreign Secretary William Hague on Monday sought to reassure Parliament that the government is not using U.S. surveillance programs to get around British law and spy on its citizens. Hague's comments followed reports in the Guardian and Observer newspapers alleging that the British spy service GCHQ had access to personal information about British citizens collected by the American Internet surveillance program code-named PRISM. Concern that domestic privacy laws may have been violated has also been raised in other European countries, where residents use U.S.-based Internet sites for voice and data communications.  In Brussels, European Union officials said they would ask their American counterparts about the program at a ministerial meeting in Dublin this week.
WORLD
May 13, 2013 | By Glen Johnson and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Deadly weekend car bombings in a southern Turkish city have galvanized domestic opposition to the government's steadfast support for Syrian rebels amid fears that Turkey is being dragged into the bloody conflict across its border. "The chaos of Syria has been transported here," said Faruk Logoglu, deputy chairman of the opposition Republican People's Party, speaking Monday from the stunned town of Reyhanli, close to the Syrian border. "This is a direct result of the government's Syria policy.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | Reuters
Russia and the United States, who locked horns for 40 years in the Cold War, may pool some intelligence services in a new era of cooperation, the U.S. Embassy here said Sunday. "Possibilities of contact and joint activity between the Russian and American intelligence services were discussed," the embassy said in a statement released after a historic visit to Moscow by CIA Director Robert M. Gates.
WORLD
May 12, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Syria on Sunday rejected Turkish charges that Damascus was behind a pair of devastating car bomb attacks in southern Turkey that killed 46 people and left scores injured. The bombings provided a worrisome indication of how the civil war in Syria is increasingly spilling into neighboring countries. In another development, a Syrian rebel group on Sunday reportedly released four United Nations peacekeepers seized along the Golan Heights border with Israel. The abduction left Israeli officials concerned that such incidents could cause peacekeepers to pull out, leaving no buffer zone between the two countries.
OPINION
March 17, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Ten years have passed since the United States invaded Iraq, a decision that almost everyone now ranks as one of the worst foreign policy blunders of our time. Why "almost"? Former President George W. Bush and his top aides still maintain that the invasion was a good idea, even though the premise on which the war was based - that Saddam Hussein had acquired weapons of mass destruction - proved false, and even though the ensuing war claimed the lives of more than 4,500 Americans and an estimated 127,000 Iraqis.
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