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Intelligence Tests

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NEWS
August 5, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Mary Amaya was stunned that day in May, 1987, when she opened a letter from Alder Junior High School in Fontana and read what it had to say about her younger son, Demond Crawford. What disturbed her was not the recommendation that her son be tested for learning disabilities. She had been baffled by Demond's recent poor performance in school and welcomed the chance to get to the bottom of things. What did upset her, she said last week, was the letter's postscript.
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SPORTS
March 24, 2009 | Mike Penner
In the words of too many announcers this past football season, Georgia's Matt Stafford separated himself from the rest of the quarterback field in one key test of potential NFL draftees -- the Wonderlic intelligence test. Out of a possible score of 50, Stafford scored 38 -- 10 points better than Mark Sanchez's 28 and 11 better than Kansas State's Josh Freeman. Stafford's score was also better than some current pros of note.
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NEWS
April 14, 1988 | Associated Press
It's smarter to exercise than to think about it, according to the Reebok Aerobic Information Bureau. It says USC researchers split 48 senior citizens into two groups: exercising and non-exercising. Intelligence tests before and after 12 weeks of exercise show that the exercising group improved its problem-solving abilities, short-term memory and concentration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
A defendant may be spared the death penalty because he is mentally deficient in one area, even if his IQ score falls in the normal range, the California Supreme Court decided Thursday. The state high court's unanimous ruling rejected an appeals court decision that "full scale" IQ scores -- composites of tests of various mental faculties -- are the best measure of intelligence.
NEWS
October 6, 1986
Tall children tend to do better on intelligence tests than short children, according to an article in the October issue of Pediatrics, published in Chicago. "We found a small but a significant association between relative height and IQ scores," said Dr. Darrell Wilson, who headed the Stanford University study. "The effect was present in both boys and girls."
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | STEVE COURTNEY, The Hartford Courant
Remember sitting in class and noticing how Alice up front always raised her hand, always knew the right answer? Remember thinking that in some undefined way you were better than she was: maybe more human, maybe more street-smart, or at least better at knock hockey? You may have been right, says Robert S. Sternberg, a Yale University psychologist whose recent book, "The Triarchic Mind: A New Theory of Human Intelligence" (Viking, $19.95), explains why. The book defines and analyzes three kinds of intelligence--internal (such as Alice's)
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | DR. PAUL GABRIEL, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Paul Gabriel is professor of clinical psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine
Intelligence tests can seem important to parents who are trying to get their children accepted into programs for the academically gifted or enrolled in a specific private school. Understanding what factors these examinations measure can help parents understand the information that they provide about their children. The tests generally measure what children know and can do at a given age in terms of verbal skills, hand-eye coordination or motor functions.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1995
Lewis M. Terman was a great believer in the power of his IQ test to determine people's proper roles in society. To him, measuring the intelligence quotient was as absolute as testing for tuberculosis--a disease that afflicted him throughout adulthood. Born in Indiana in 1877, the 12th of 14 children, Terman was an avid reader who escaped the family's farm and went on to head Stanford University's psychology department. His own definition of a gifted child would likely have fitted him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1987 | JOSIE E. MARTIN, Josie E. Martin is a school psychologist for the Los Angeles Unified School District
In response to a court decision last summer, the California Department of Education issued a directive prohibiting the use of intelligence tests on black children referred for special education. The Los Angeles Unified School District goes it one better. On Dec. 19 the assistant superintendent's office issued a bulletin directing school psychologists to refrain from the use of intelligence tests for all students referred for special education. We have come full circle.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Laguna Hills mother whose 7-year-old daughter was denied an intelligence test because she is African American filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Friday accusing an Orange County school district of discrimination. The dispute stems from a landmark 1979 federal court ruling that prohibits California public schools from giving standardized intelligence tests to African American children to determine mental retardation.
HEALTH
March 15, 2004 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Do you realize how your feelings affect your judgment? Can you openly acknowledge your weaknesses? Do you have "presence"? More to the point: Would your co-workers and boss agree with your answers? It's worth thinking about. Because in the last 10 years, these kinds of inquiries have made their way into employee development programs, management coaching seminars and selection criteria for upper-management positions.
WORLD
July 3, 2003 | From Associated Press
The longest study of children born after in vitro fertilization and similar treatments is reassuring on intelligence scores and psychological health, but raises concerns that the rate of birth defects may be higher than normal, researchers said Wednesday. The study, funded by the European Union, involved more than 1,500 children from Britain, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark and Greece tracked up to age 5.
NEWS
April 15, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children who are outgoing and adventurous as toddlers have substantially higher IQs by the time they are preteens, according to new research by scientists studying how personality shapes intelligence. Seeking links between childhood behavior and mental ability, scientists at USC and UC Riverside compared how eagerly youngsters sought out new experiences at age 3 and how well they performed on various tests of mental ability eight years later at age 11.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1999
Q: To what extent can intelligence or personality tests be administered to job applicants, especially those for key corporate positions, as part of the screening process? Generally, a manager or executive's personality or cognitive abilities will be a very important indicator of success in a position, in addition to experience and training. --G.A.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit by a man who was deemed too smart to be a New London, Conn., police officer. U.S. District Judge Peter C. Dorsey said the Police Department's rejection of Robert Jordan because he scored too high on an intelligence test did not violate his rights. The city's rationale for the long-standing practice is that candidates who score too high could soon get bored and quit after undergoing costly academy training.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | DEBRA HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trick Question: Should parents administer at-home IQ tests to their kids? Pick one: a) Yes; b) No; or c) Maybe, but don't make me take one myself. For parents hoping their kids will be able to fork out for their own educations from their "Jeopardy" winnings, here's news. Virtual Knowledge, a Needham, Mass.-based software company, has begun offering what it says is the first CD-ROM aptitude and IQ test for children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Laguna Hills mother whose 7-year-old daughter was denied an intelligence test because she is African American filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Friday charging a local school district with discrimination. The dispute stems from a landmark 1979 federal court ruling that prohibits California public schools from giving standardized intelligence tests to African American children to determine mental retardation.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you think you took your last do-or-die test to graduate from school, think again and start sharpening your pencil. An increasing number of companies are instituting batteries of tests designed to predict whether job applicants will be productive, drug-free, honest workers. Employers are relying more on test results in part because the labor pool has been shrinking nationwide. That situation is particularly noticeable in Orange County, where the unemployment rate has sunk to 2.9%.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | DR. PAUL GABRIEL, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Paul Gabriel is professor of clinical psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine
Intelligence tests can seem important to parents who are trying to get their children accepted into programs for the academically gifted or enrolled in a specific private school. Understanding what factors these examinations measure can help parents understand the information that they provide about their children. The tests generally measure what children know and can do at a given age in terms of verbal skills, hand-eye coordination or motor functions.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1995 | Richard C. Paddock, Richard C. Paddock covers Northern California for The Times
The boy who would grow up to direct "The Caine Mutiny" was a 13-year-old student at Lockwood Street School on the fringes of Hollywood when he was discovered by Lewis M. Terman, the inventor of the modern-day IQ test. It was 1922, and the Stanford University professor had dispersed a small flock of assistants to test children around the state.
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