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BUSINESS
March 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Latin, Caribbean Economies Grow: The economies grew by 2.6% in 1992, the Inter-American Development Bank said, the second consecutive year of growth after a decade of stagnation. In its annual report, the lending bank painted a bright picture for the region in 1992, but said much remains to be done in a continent where more than a third of the population can barely earn a living.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 2010 | By Jacqueline Charles
A mango trapper muscles his way high up the tree, then stops on a branch. Spotting a hanging fruit, he pushes his homemade picking pole forward, trapping it. He then drops the kidney-shaped Madame Francis mango to a teenage boy who holds out a rice sack to break its fall. It's a homespun harvesting technique that helps feed about half a million Haitian peasants, but one that is also keeping the $10-million- to $12-million-a-year industry from reaching its full potential. "We would like another way to pick the mangoes," said Ernst Excellent, 22, one of hundreds of fournisseurs , or middlemen, who wander Haiti's rugged terrain in pursuit of mangoes, most of which end up in U.S. supermarkets.
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NEWS
July 23, 1989
The Inter-American Development Bank has agreed to loan Brazil money to begin paving a highway in the western Amazon, ending a two-year delay caused by environmentalists worried about the road's effect on the fragile forest. William Ellis, the bank's representative in Brazil, said the organization will finance 40% of the $146 million needed to complete the jungle project.
WORLD
October 24, 2008 | Chris Kraul, Kraul is a Times staff writer.
In the latest sign of China's increasing economic stake and political muscle in Latin America, the Asian giant is joining a Washington-based international bank that finances development projects throughout the region. China's membership in the Inter-American Development Bank, announced Thursday, is expected to increase the nation's profile and influence in a part of the world that historically has been under the sway of the United States.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | ANTHONY DAY, TIMES SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
The president of the Inter-American Development Bank said Tuesday that he is "serenely optimistic" about the economic future of Latin America. Enrique V. Iglesias told a meeting of the Interamerican Press Assn. that he believes that the region is at least pulling out of the slump of the 1980s, in which it slipped backward 13 years in overall living standards. Some countries fell back 25 years, he said. Iglesias said the region's overall economic output is expected to rise by 2.4% this year.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Latin American currencies are ill-equipped to withstand the pressures of the high-speed global economy, the Inter-American Development Bank on Sunday issued a report urging the region to consider linking its currencies to the dollar or replacing them with greenbacks altogether.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Central and South Americans working outside their countries will send $60 billion home this year, up 12% from 2005, the Inter-American Development Bank said. The bulk of the money, an estimated $45 billion, is being sent by 12.6 million Latin Americans in the U.S., the organization said in a report based on surveys of immigrants in New York, Los Angeles and Miami.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic Gains in Latin America: Latin America made impressive economic gains last year after the "lost decade" of the 1980s, the Inter-American Development Bank reported. Total income rose 2.7% in 1990, compared to a decline of 0.8% in 1989, it said. "Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Panama and Venezuela . . . were especially successful in establishing growth," the report said. Venezuela showed the best growth, with the average income in 1990 being $3,038.
WORLD
May 28, 2008 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
With soaring food prices triggering unrest and threatening Latin America's economic progress, the Inter-American Development Bank on Wednesday announced an emergency credit line for countries in the region. The $500-million fund will support projects that improve agricultural productivity, invest in rural areas, improve distribution and strengthen programs designed to improve health and encourage education.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Central and South Americans working outside their countries will send $60 billion home this year, up 12% from 2005, the Inter-American Development Bank said. The bulk of the money, an estimated $45 billion, is being sent by 12.6 million Latin Americans in the U.S., the organization said in a report based on surveys of immigrants in New York, Los Angeles and Miami.
OPINION
May 21, 2005
There is a bank in India that sends out ATM machines to roam the countryside, allowing villagers to withdraw some of the cash earned by their relatives in places like the Middle East, Britain and California. It's a modern twist on a venerable tradition. Depending on your village, Wednesday could be cash day at the market.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | By Chris Kraul
U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers called on the Inter-American Development Bank to reduce its financing of infrastructure projects in Latin America and take on more education projects. Inadequate education increasingly puts the region at a disadvantage with developed countries, Summers said at the IDB annual meeting in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Latin American currencies are ill-equipped to withstand the pressures of the high-speed global economy, the Inter-American Development Bank on Sunday issued a report urging the region to consider linking its currencies to the dollar or replacing them with greenbacks altogether.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's new push to pay $1 billion in U.S. arrears to the United Nations would cover only part of the mushrooming U.S. backlog in payments to various international organizations. Washington owes even more in back dues--a hefty $1.562 billion--to international financial institutions including the World Bank and the three major regional development banks that lend to countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Like the U.N.
OPINION
May 21, 2005
There is a bank in India that sends out ATM machines to roam the countryside, allowing villagers to withdraw some of the cash earned by their relatives in places like the Middle East, Britain and California. It's a modern twist on a venerable tradition. Depending on your village, Wednesday could be cash day at the market.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Latin, Caribbean Economies Grow: The economies grew by 2.6% in 1992, the Inter-American Development Bank said, the second consecutive year of growth after a decade of stagnation. In its annual report, the lending bank painted a bright picture for the region in 1992, but said much remains to be done in a continent where more than a third of the population can barely earn a living.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Economic Gains in Latin America: Latin America made impressive economic gains last year after the "lost decade" of the 1980s, the Inter-American Development Bank reported. Total income rose 2.7% in 1990, compared to a decline of 0.8% in 1989, it said. "Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Panama and Venezuela . . . were especially successful in establishing growth," the report said. Venezuela showed the best growth, with the average income in 1990 being $3,038.
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