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Inter Services Intelligence

OPINION
June 14, 2002
The arrest of Jose Padilla (Abdullah al Muhajir) for training to develop "dirty" bombs in Pakistan, and the nuclear threats from Pakistan during the recent tensions in South Asia should leave no doubt that our foreign policy with regard to Pakistan has been flawed and has allowed terrorists to flourish. Nuclear bombs and nuclear scientists in Pakistan are the biggest threat to the world today because they can easily fall into the hands of terrorists like Al Qaeda. We have been reluctant to take on the religious extremists in Pakistan and governmental agencies like the Inter-Services Intelligence agency, which trains and funds them.
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WORLD
August 16, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Despite a surge in arrests of Al Qaeda suspects, a senior Pakistani anti-terrorism official said investigators still had not found the trail of their main target, Osama bin Laden. "You can only be sure you're closing in on someone when you at least have a hint of his whereabouts," Brig. Javed Iqbal Cheema said in an interview last week. "With regard to Osama bin Laden himself, I would say that we are not getting any substantial leads as yet."
WORLD
September 22, 2009 | Greg Miller
The U.S. military commander in Afghanistan says he has evidence that factions of Pakistani and Iranian spy services are supporting insurgent groups that carry out attacks on coalition troops. Taliban fighters in Afghanistan are being aided by "elements of some intelligence agencies," Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal wrote in a detailed analysis of the military situation delivered to the White House earlier this month. McChrystal went on to single out Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency as well as the Quds Force of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard as contributing to the external forces working to undermine U.S. interests and destabilize the government in Kabul.
OPINION
April 3, 2002
In predawn raids last week, a combined force of FBI agents and Pakistani police shot and took into custody one of Osama bin Laden's top aides. The arrest demonstrated the kind of teamwork that must continue in the hunt for Al Qaeda terrorists and their Taliban protectors. But recent developments raise the question of how much help Pakistan is willing to provide.
WORLD
February 2, 2004 | Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
The father of Pakistan's nuclear bomb, Abdul Qadeer Khan, has admitted providing nuclear secrets to Iran, Libya and North Korea, senior Pakistani military officials said Sunday. In a background briefing to Pakistani journalists, officials said they had obtained a 12-page confession from Khan, who had led Pakistan's nuclear program since the 1970s and helped it become the first Muslim nation to possess nuclear weapons.
WORLD
May 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
A prominent separatist in Kashmir who sought dialogue with India and opposed violence was shot to death Tuesday in front of 5,000 people at a ceremony here to commemorate another assassinated independence leader. The slaying of Abdul Ghani Lone, 70, came at a time of increasing tensions between India and Pakistan, nuclear powers that have fought two wars over the divided Himalayan region.
WORLD
May 6, 2005 | Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
Pakistani authorities said Thursday that they had arrested 13 more alleged Al Qaeda-linked militants in a fresh sweep in the semiautonomous tribal region of Bajur in northwestern Pakistan. The arrests came a day after the government disclosed the capture of a man they described as a leading Al Qaeda figure, Abu Faraj Farj, also known as Abu Faraj Libbi. A senior Pakistani government official said there were no direct links between the two operations.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan - A roadside bomb killed a provincial peace negotiator and two police officers in southern Afghanistan on Wednesday, dealing another setback to President Hamid Karzai's attempts to get talks started with Taliban militants after more than 11 years of conflict. Malim Shah Wali Khan, 53, and his security detail were driving through the volatile southern province of Helmand when militants detonated the bomb, killing him and two of his bodyguards, according to the provincial governor's office.
WORLD
August 23, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - A potentially serious rift has emerged in the way the Afghan and U.S. governments view "insider" shootings, instances of Afghan police and soldiers turning their guns on Western troops. Washington and NATO coalition officials have consistently said most of the shootings, which have claimed the lives of at least 10 U.S. service members this month alone, stem from personal disputes, stress, cultural differences and battle fatigue, with a small percentage of the assailants acting at the behest of the Taliban.
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