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Inter Services Intelligence

May 1, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan - A roadside bomb killed a provincial peace negotiator and two police officers in southern Afghanistan on Wednesday, dealing another setback to President Hamid Karzai's attempts to get talks started with Taliban militants after more than 11 years of conflict. Malim Shah Wali Khan, 53, and his security detail were driving through the volatile southern province of Helmand when militants detonated the bomb, killing him and two of his bodyguards, according to the provincial governor's office.
May 9, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A private Pakistani television network has divulged what it claims is the name of the CIA's current station chief in Islamabad, the second time in six months that local media have attempted to unmask the agency's top spy in the South Asian nation. However, the Associated Press on Monday reported without elaboration that the network got the name wrong. The report by the private ARY network raised the possibility that Pakistan's intelligence community could be trying to broadside the CIA following embarrassment here over the U.S. raid last week that killed Osama bin Laden.
October 2, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Aimal Yaqubi, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan's Foreign Ministry on Sunday strongly rejected claims that the nation's premier spy agency was involved in the assassination of Afghanistan's chief negotiator with the Taliban. Afghan and U.S. officials have been increasing pressure on Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, to sever its ties with the Haqqani network, an affiliate of the Afghan Taliban regarded by Washington as the most dangerous security threat to U.S., NATO and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.
March 29, 2009 | Greg Miller
President Obama's plan to create a unified U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan marks his effort to sever his administration's approach from the failures of the past. But administration officials are struggling to identify a clear path around the problem that has undermined U.S.
July 30, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
In a demonstration of growing U.S. frustration, the CIA's deputy director flew to Islamabad this month to warn Pakistani officials that they need to do more to address dangerous ties between the country's spy agency and resurgent Al Qaeda-linked militants, a U.S. official said Tuesday.
July 16, 2009 | Greg Miller
In movies, the CIA has so many prolifically lethal assassins roaming the world that the main problem often seems to be reining them in. But details that spilled out this week about a real CIA assassination program indicate that when the plotting is being done by spies instead of screenwriters, the obstacles are not so easy to surmount. According to current and former U.S.
November 24, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
A pair of suicide bombers, in apparently synchronized attacks, killed at least 35 people today in early-morning blasts near major military installations, Pakistani officials said. The powerful blasts in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, next to Islamabad, the capital, targeted a bus carrying employees of Pakistan's spy agency, Inter-Services Intelligence, and a checkpoint outside army headquarters.
September 5, 2007 | Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu, Special to The Times
Police stepped up security and put this capital on high alert Tuesday after apparent twin suicide bombings in a nearby army garrison city killed 25 people and injured more than 60. The double blasts struck at the heart of Pakistan's military establishment in Rawalpindi, which adjoins Islamabad and is home to President Pervez Musharraf and other senior government figures.
April 13, 2007 | Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu, Special to The Times
Tribal fighters near the border with Afghanistan have killed 300 foreign militants allegedly linked to Al Qaeda over the last few weeks, President Pervez Musharraf said Thursday. Speaking at a counterterrorism conference here in the capital, Musharraf acknowledged for the first time that Pakistan's military had been assisting the tribesmen in their battle against mostly Uzbek militants who have found a haven in the remote, lawless region of South Waziristan.
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