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Inter Services Intelligence

WORLD
August 23, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - A potentially serious rift has emerged in the way the Afghan and U.S. governments view "insider" shootings, instances of Afghan police and soldiers turning their guns on Western troops. Washington and NATO coalition officials have consistently said most of the shootings, which have claimed the lives of at least 10 U.S. service members this month alone, stem from personal disputes, stress, cultural differences and battle fatigue, with a small percentage of the assailants acting at the behest of the Taliban.
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WORLD
October 2, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Aimal Yaqubi, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan's Foreign Ministry on Sunday strongly rejected claims that the nation's premier spy agency was involved in the assassination of Afghanistan's chief negotiator with the Taliban. Afghan and U.S. officials have been increasing pressure on Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, to sever its ties with the Haqqani network, an affiliate of the Afghan Taliban regarded by Washington as the most dangerous security threat to U.S., NATO and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan - A roadside bomb killed a provincial peace negotiator and two police officers in southern Afghanistan on Wednesday, dealing another setback to President Hamid Karzai's attempts to get talks started with Taliban militants after more than 11 years of conflict. Malim Shah Wali Khan, 53, and his security detail were driving through the volatile southern province of Helmand when militants detonated the bomb, killing him and two of his bodyguards, according to the provincial governor's office.
WORLD
March 29, 2009 | Greg Miller
President Obama's plan to create a unified U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan marks his effort to sever his administration's approach from the failures of the past. But administration officials are struggling to identify a clear path around the problem that has undermined U.S.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2009 | Greg Miller
In movies, the CIA has so many prolifically lethal assassins roaming the world that the main problem often seems to be reining them in. But details that spilled out this week about a real CIA assassination program indicate that when the plotting is being done by spies instead of screenwriters, the obstacles are not so easy to surmount. According to current and former U.S.
WORLD
May 26, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan's high court ruled Tuesday that authorities did not have enough evidence to arrest a firebrand Islamic cleric suspected of masterminding the deadly attacks on the Indian city of Mumbai. The ruling is likely to anger India's government at a time when the two rival countries seek a thaw in relations. Hafiz Saeed founded Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistani militant group blamed for the string of assaults on luxury hotels, a railway station and other targets in Mumbai that killed 166 people in 2008.
WORLD
December 22, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The NATO force in Afghanistan denied Tuesday that the American military intends to carry out ground raids inside Pakistan in pursuit of insurgent leaders hiding there. The sharply worded statement underscored the extreme sensitivities surrounding the subject of militant sanctuaries inside Pakistan, which were identified last week in a White House assessment of the Afghan conflict as a key impediment to subduing the Taliban and other insurgent groups. In recent years, the U.S. military has launched numerous incursions into Pakistan, though the vast majority have been carried out by unmanned aerial drones.
WORLD
November 24, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
A pair of suicide bombers, in apparently synchronized attacks, killed at least 35 people today in early-morning blasts near major military installations, Pakistani officials said. The powerful blasts in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, next to Islamabad, the capital, targeted a bus carrying employees of Pakistan's spy agency, Inter-Services Intelligence, and a checkpoint outside army headquarters.
WORLD
September 5, 2007 | Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu, Special to The Times
Police stepped up security and put this capital on high alert Tuesday after apparent twin suicide bombings in a nearby army garrison city killed 25 people and injured more than 60. The double blasts struck at the heart of Pakistan's military establishment in Rawalpindi, which adjoins Islamabad and is home to President Pervez Musharraf and other senior government figures.
WORLD
April 13, 2007 | Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu, Special to The Times
Tribal fighters near the border with Afghanistan have killed 300 foreign militants allegedly linked to Al Qaeda over the last few weeks, President Pervez Musharraf said Thursday. Speaking at a counterterrorism conference here in the capital, Musharraf acknowledged for the first time that Pakistan's military had been assisting the tribesmen in their battle against mostly Uzbek militants who have found a haven in the remote, lawless region of South Waziristan.
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