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Inter Services Intelligence

WORLD
October 2, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Aimal Yaqubi, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan's Foreign Ministry on Sunday strongly rejected claims that the nation's premier spy agency was involved in the assassination of Afghanistan's chief negotiator with the Taliban. Afghan and U.S. officials have been increasing pressure on Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, to sever its ties with the Haqqani network, an affiliate of the Afghan Taliban regarded by Washington as the most dangerous security threat to U.S., NATO and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.
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WORLD
May 9, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A private Pakistani television network has divulged what it claims is the name of the CIA's current station chief in Islamabad, the second time in six months that local media have attempted to unmask the agency's top spy in the South Asian nation. However, the Associated Press on Monday reported without elaboration that the network got the name wrong. The report by the private ARY network raised the possibility that Pakistan's intelligence community could be trying to broadside the CIA following embarrassment here over the U.S. raid last week that killed Osama bin Laden.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan - A roadside bomb killed a provincial peace negotiator and two police officers in southern Afghanistan on Wednesday, dealing another setback to President Hamid Karzai's attempts to get talks started with Taliban militants after more than 11 years of conflict. Malim Shah Wali Khan, 53, and his security detail were driving through the volatile southern province of Helmand when militants detonated the bomb, killing him and two of his bodyguards, according to the provincial governor's office.
WORLD
August 23, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - A potentially serious rift has emerged in the way the Afghan and U.S. governments view "insider" shootings, instances of Afghan police and soldiers turning their guns on Western troops. Washington and NATO coalition officials have consistently said most of the shootings, which have claimed the lives of at least 10 U.S. service members this month alone, stem from personal disputes, stress, cultural differences and battle fatigue, with a small percentage of the assailants acting at the behest of the Taliban.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2009 | Greg Miller
In movies, the CIA has so many prolifically lethal assassins roaming the world that the main problem often seems to be reining them in. But details that spilled out this week about a real CIA assassination program indicate that when the plotting is being done by spies instead of screenwriters, the obstacles are not so easy to surmount. According to current and former U.S.
WORLD
March 29, 2009 | Greg Miller
President Obama's plan to create a unified U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan marks his effort to sever his administration's approach from the failures of the past. But administration officials are struggling to identify a clear path around the problem that has undermined U.S.
WORLD
June 15, 2011 | From Reuters
Pakistan's top military spy agency has arrested five CIA informants who fed information to U.S. intelligence before the raid last month which killed Osama bin Laden, The New York Times reported on Wednesday. One of the detainees was reported to be a Pakistani Army major whom officials said copied license plates of cars visiting the al Qaeda leader's compound 30 miles northwest of Islamabad. The fate of the CIA informants arrested in Pakistan was unclear, the newspaper reported, citing American officials.
WORLD
November 18, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
  Pakistan's ambassador to the United States was summoned back to Islamabad this week to explain his role in a purported attempt to get Washington's help in reining in his country's powerful military. The envoy, Husain Haqqani, faces questioning in a controversy involving a Pakistani American businessman's claim that the businessman passed along a memo from President Asif Ali Zardari seeking Washington's assistance in fending off a possible military overthrow. The businessman, Mansoor Ijaz, claimed in a newspaper column Oct. 10 that he delivered the memo to Adm. Michael G. Mullen, then the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, at the request of an unnamed senior Pakistani diplomat.
WORLD
September 9, 2008 | Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King, Special to The Times
U.S. forces made an apparently unsuccessful attempt Monday to assassinate a prominent Taliban-linked commander who sometimes shelters in Pakistan's tribal areas, witnesses and military officials said. Missiles, apparently from an American drone aircraft, struck a compound in the insurgent stronghold of North Waziristan, just across the border from Afghanistan, witnesses said. At least nine people were killed, though some reports put the toll as high as 21. The targeted village, Dandi Derpakhel, contained an Islamic seminary and a family compound associated with the Haqqani clan.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The Pakistani army accused Indian troops of launching a cross-border raid early Sunday in the disputed Kashmir region that killed a Pakistani soldier, while India countered that it retaliated with small arms fire only after Pakistan fired first with shelling and automatic weapons. What impact the incident will have on the recent warming in relations between the two nuclear archrivals remains to be seen. Cross-border firing between soldiers on both sides of the “line of control” that separates Pakistan- and India-administered Kashmir has happened on numerous occasions in the past, but raids over the border that involve soldier deaths have been rare.
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