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NEWS
October 18, 1985
Nearly two dozen personal computer systems belonging to north San Diego County high school students were seized by FBI agents investigating unauthorized "accessing" into a computer data base belonging to Interactive Data Corp., a subsidiary of Chase Manhattan Bank. No arrests were made, an FBI spokesman said, but the probe is continuing. Many of the students whose computers were seized reportedly attend Mt. Carmel High School in Penasquitos and Poway High School.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1988 | Reuters
Dun & Bradstreet Corp., the business information company, said Wednesday that it signed a definitive agreement to acquire Chase Manhattan Corp.'s Interactive Data Corp. for $140 million in cash. Lexington, Mass.-based Interactive is a leading provider of securities information and related analytical services, providing performance data on public companies. It also furnishes prices of equity and fixed-income securities on a current and historical basis.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
General Electric Co. and Financial Times publisher Pearson reportedly are discussing making a joint bid for Wall Street Journal publisher Dow Jones & Co. A privately held joint venture combining the Financial Times of London, Dow Jones and business channel CNBC was said to be in preliminary talks. The talks were reported Sunday by both the Financial Times and the Journal in online reports.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1988 | Associated Press
Dun & Bradstreet Corp. announced Sunday that it was selling its airline guides business for $750 million cash to a company formed by British publisher Robert Maxwell, and had given Maxwell an option to purchase its travel agency business. The business publishing and market research company, which had announced in July that it was seeking a buyer for its Official Airline Guides and Thomas Cook Travel USA units, said it should realize a $450-million after-tax gain from the deal.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | From Times Wires
Two of the nation's largest bank holding companies--Chase Manhattan Corp. and Continental Illinois Corp.--on Monday reported a sharp increase in their first-quarter profits. Chase, the nation's second-largest banking company, said net income totaled $277 million, up 166% from $104 million in the year-earlier quarter. Continental Illinois, ranked 15th, said it netted $68.5 million, up 59% from earnings of $43.1 million in 1987.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Associated Press
In a major victory for business, the state Supreme Court today restricted the right of fired workers to sue their employers on the grounds that a dismissal broke a promise of continued employment. The conservative-dominated court ruled 4-3 that a worker who is fired without good cause, in violation of a company's express or implied promise, can sue only for reinstatement and back pay, and not for emotional distress and punitive damage awards that often are much larger.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Ruth Thomas' executive position with Alpha Beta disappeared in a corporate reshuffle. Virginia Rulon-Miller lost her job with IBM because she was dating an employee of a rival firm. Michael E. Gray was fired for writing a rebuttal to a performance review on company time. Daniel Foley was replaced for "performance reasons" after he inquired about rumors that his boss was suspected of embezzlement. All of them sued, and their cases have become pieces of a growing legal jigsaw puzzle.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Although more fired employees are seeking legal recourse in the courts, a new study by the Rand Corp. suggests that terminated employees and their employers would do better financially by trying to settle their differences out of court rather than going to trial. "Unless you have a very good case, don't bother (filing suit)," said James N. Dertouzos, a Rand economist, who was one of three authors of the study published by the nonprofit, Santa Monica-based research institute.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
By his account, Daniel Foley was only doing the right thing when he told his superiors in 1983 that he had heard that his new boss had been fired by a previous employer and was under investigation for embezzlement here. But rather than winning their gratitude, Foley was later told that he was being dismissed--despite seven years of unblemished service, in which he rose to be manager of his firm's Los Angeles branch at a yearly salary of $56,164.
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