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Interactive Multimedia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1994 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Employing late 20th-Century technology to give relevance to an ancient rite, congregants at Wilshire Boulevard Temple on Thursday observed Yom Kippur--the most solemn day of the Jewish year--with an experimental interactive multimedia presentation.
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NEWS
November 4, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Anne Bray can't face her television. As the director of LA Freewaves, the biennial festival of video and new media, she's spent countless hours in front of her TV screen. But only looking at art. Don't ask her to tune in to commercial broadcasts. "It upsets me, says Bray, 55. "Others watch TV to be entertained or to relax. That's not my reaction. I get angry because of racism, sexism and stereotyping. I once watched the home shopping channel and my mouth was hanging open."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LAURENCE VITTES
Imagine listening to a compact disc and simultaneously having access to a computerized, user-friendly, verbal and visual encyclopedia about the music. For example, you're listening to Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14 and the computer program--in a chapter about musical pitches--informs you: "Musicians eventually became frustrated. Picture the situation: Wonderful tunes were invented, became Top 40 chants, but suddenly were forgotten because someone's memory lapsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Mark Caro, Chicago Tribune
Movies really are about giving up control. In the ideal experience, you sit in a dark room and become totally immersed in what's happening on the screen. Choice doesn't enter into it. Thought doesn't enter into it. If you're in the hands of a masterful storyteller, you should feel you're vicariously living another life. Yet as the movie world orbits into an increasingly high-tech universe, consumers are finding they have more control over what they consider a night at the movies.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Sony Corp. pursues its grand vision of marrying consumer electronics hardware and entertainment software, most of the attention has been focused on the expensive acquisitions of CBS Records and Columbia Pictures. But the third piece of Sony Software--a recently formed unit called Sony Electronic Publishing (SEP)--may have an even more direct impact on the success or failure of specific new hardware products.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1993 | EVAN RAMSTAD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Convergence. Interactive multimedia. Information highway. The buzzwords seem to be everywhere as communications, entertainment and computer companies chart a united future. These changes involve lots of companies, new rules, enormous sums of money and the lives of everyone. But they are driven by the technological equivalent of a cell in a living organism. It is called the bit. Nearly all expression--the spoken word, music, video and text--can now be turned into combinations of bits.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BMG in First Interactive Entertainment Venture: As expected, Bertelsmann Music Group announced it has entered into a joint venture with Ion, a California-based multimedia publishing company, to produce interactive music and entertainment products. The partnership, initially a 50% equity investment by BMG, is the recording company's first foray into the growing field of interactive multimedia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and MIMI KO CRUZ and BILL BILLITER
Fullerton College has received a $440,568 grant from the State's Employment Training Panel to provide training to 42 jobless people through a program called Interactive Multimedia Design. Aimed at retraining those with backgrounds in programming graphics and related fields, the program is open to all who are interested. College officials said they anticipate placing people who complete the program in jobs as multimedia producers, designers, programmers, graphic artists and editors.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Siemens Unveils Ties With U.S. Firms: The company announced an alliance with Scientific Atlanta Inc. and Sun Microsystems Inc. to develop and market systems to transmit multimedia services worldwide. The alliance centers on "IMMXpress" systems that deliver data and sound and video products through cable and telephone networks. Siemens said IMMXpress is a modular system that will allow cable and phone companies to select system components that best suit their needs.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Sunday's Super Bowl on ABC is likely to reach about 40 million U.S. homes, the largest audience for any broadcast this year. But Rick Mandler, who runs ABC's interactive TV efforts, is focused on a different milestone. His team expects to deliver an enhanced version of the game to more than half a million computer screens -- the largest audience ever for an interactive TV program. The enhanced program has another distinction that's even more important to Walt Disney Co.'s ABC.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2003 | Marc Saltzman, Special to The Times
Thanks to its interactive capabilities and unprecedented storage space, the 6-year-old medium known as DVDs has become an increasingly sought-after canvas for some of Hollywood's most talented artists. And no, we're not talking about filmmakers. Although the feature films grab viewers' attention and are the first thing most people watch, millions of people also want the extras.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2002 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
In early September, Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates staged a Hollywood gala to impress the recording and movie industries with his company's latest software for digital music and video, Windows Media 9. A few weeks later, Microsoft started showing off Windows Media 9 to an audience reviled by the entertainment industry: the Kazaa file-sharing network, where users routinely copy digital songs, films and software free.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2002 | JON HEALEY and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Venturing into the heart of Hollywood, Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday unveiled the preliminary version of its latest software for watching movies and listening to music, hoping to persuade consumers and entertainment companies to give Windows-based computers a starring role in the future of entertainment. Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates was joined by a handful of entertainment luminaries who endorsed the more than 120 improvements to the company's Windows Media technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
The Bessarabian Germans mourned the loss of their homeland and possessions. The Jews danced and rejoiced; they lost everything but their lives had been saved. Still, the uncanny parallelism is a matter of record. These Jews and Germans were both transported to safety and documented on film by the same river captain, who ferried them into historical memory.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2002 | Jon Healey
Interactive TV, already a feature of some football and baseball broadcasts, comes to golf today as ABC lets fans test their prognosticating and trivia skills during coverage of a made-for-television tournament in Palm Desert. While Tiger Woods and three other pro golfers battle on the course, viewers will be able to compete for golf-themed prizes online at www.espn.com.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences on Monday announced a new Emmy for interactive TV programming, signaling that the long-hyped but little-seen marriage of technology and TV has finally won a foothold in the industry. Chances are good, however, that the winning enhancements won't have been seen by most TV viewers. That's because relatively few sets, cable converter boxes or satellite receivers in the U.S. are delivering that kind of interactivity today.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gordon Quinn was a few settings below enthusiastic when he took his latest work-in-progress, "The New Americans," to an interactive TV workshop run by the American Film Institute. "I was a skeptic at the beginning," said Quinn, a producer whose credits include the acclaimed basketball documentary "Hoop Dreams." "But I'm totally sold on it at the end because I can see what it can accomplish." Aided by a group of engineers and design companies, including Santa Monica-based Artifact Inc.
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