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Interactive Multimedia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1994 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Employing late 20th-Century technology to give relevance to an ancient rite, congregants at Wilshire Boulevard Temple on Thursday observed Yom Kippur--the most solemn day of the Jewish year--with an experimental interactive multimedia presentation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2003 | Marc Saltzman, Special to The Times
Thanks to its interactive capabilities and unprecedented storage space, the 6-year-old medium known as DVDs has become an increasingly sought-after canvas for some of Hollywood's most talented artists. And no, we're not talking about filmmakers. Although the feature films grab viewers' attention and are the first thing most people watch, millions of people also want the extras.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LAURENCE VITTES
Imagine listening to a compact disc and simultaneously having access to a computerized, user-friendly, verbal and visual encyclopedia about the music. For example, you're listening to Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14 and the computer program--in a chapter about musical pitches--informs you: "Musicians eventually became frustrated. Picture the situation: Wonderful tunes were invented, became Top 40 chants, but suddenly were forgotten because someone's memory lapsed.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2002 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
In early September, Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates staged a Hollywood gala to impress the recording and movie industries with his company's latest software for digital music and video, Windows Media 9. A few weeks later, Microsoft started showing off Windows Media 9 to an audience reviled by the entertainment industry: the Kazaa file-sharing network, where users routinely copy digital songs, films and software free.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Sony Corp. pursues its grand vision of marrying consumer electronics hardware and entertainment software, most of the attention has been focused on the expensive acquisitions of CBS Records and Columbia Pictures. But the third piece of Sony Software--a recently formed unit called Sony Electronic Publishing (SEP)--may have an even more direct impact on the success or failure of specific new hardware products.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1993 | EVAN RAMSTAD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Convergence. Interactive multimedia. Information highway. The buzzwords seem to be everywhere as communications, entertainment and computer companies chart a united future. These changes involve lots of companies, new rules, enormous sums of money and the lives of everyone. But they are driven by the technological equivalent of a cell in a living organism. It is called the bit. Nearly all expression--the spoken word, music, video and text--can now be turned into combinations of bits.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BMG in First Interactive Entertainment Venture: As expected, Bertelsmann Music Group announced it has entered into a joint venture with Ion, a California-based multimedia publishing company, to produce interactive music and entertainment products. The partnership, initially a 50% equity investment by BMG, is the recording company's first foray into the growing field of interactive multimedia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and MIMI KO CRUZ and BILL BILLITER
Fullerton College has received a $440,568 grant from the State's Employment Training Panel to provide training to 42 jobless people through a program called Interactive Multimedia Design. Aimed at retraining those with backgrounds in programming graphics and related fields, the program is open to all who are interested. College officials said they anticipate placing people who complete the program in jobs as multimedia producers, designers, programmers, graphic artists and editors.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Siemens Unveils Ties With U.S. Firms: The company announced an alliance with Scientific Atlanta Inc. and Sun Microsystems Inc. to develop and market systems to transmit multimedia services worldwide. The alliance centers on "IMMXpress" systems that deliver data and sound and video products through cable and telephone networks. Siemens said IMMXpress is a modular system that will allow cable and phone companies to select system components that best suit their needs.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2002 | JON HEALEY and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Venturing into the heart of Hollywood, Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday unveiled the preliminary version of its latest software for watching movies and listening to music, hoping to persuade consumers and entertainment companies to give Windows-based computers a starring role in the future of entertainment. Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates was joined by a handful of entertainment luminaries who endorsed the more than 120 improvements to the company's Windows Media technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
The Bessarabian Germans mourned the loss of their homeland and possessions. The Jews danced and rejoiced; they lost everything but their lives had been saved. Still, the uncanny parallelism is a matter of record. These Jews and Germans were both transported to safety and documented on film by the same river captain, who ferried them into historical memory.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2001 | JON HEALEY and RICHARD VERRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the latest effort to bring the Internet to the living room, electronics companies are unveiling a new breed of digital recorders that can download video from the Web and play it on TV sets. Today, Sonicblue Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif., is expected to revive the defunct ReplayTV brand with four new digital video recorders that can tap into the Web as well as conventional TV broadcasts. A similar device was announced earlier this year by Echostar Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2001 | From Staff and wire reports
AT&T Corp. said Thursday that it is scaling back plans to develop a set-top cable box with Microsoft Corp. The reversal comes after repeated delays by Microsoft in meeting its obligations under the software giant's $5-billion investment in AT&T two years ago. Under that agreement, AT&T would use Microsoft interactive television software in up to 10 million set-top boxes.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran developer of television-oriented Web sites will lead Game Show Network's interactive-TV and Internet efforts, network officials said Tuesday. John P. Roberts, 35, was named senior vice president for interactive and online entertainment at the network, which is owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment and Liberty Digital Inc. The appointment is the first by Rich Cronin, who became the network's president and chief executive last month.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001
Vivendi Universal unit Canal Plus Technologies announced a deal with WINfirst under which the U.S. fiber-optic network company will use Canal's technology to deliver interactive TV services. Canal Plus Technologies did not give financial details of the deal but said in a statement that the agreement will allow Denver-based WINfirst to offer interactive digital TV services to more than 3.7 million cable-connected households.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Infogrames Entertainment's North American operations consisted of about 20 people working out of as many cubicles in San Jose, recycling European video games for the U.S. market. But after a $250-million-plus shopping spree in the U.S., the French company is poised to become the world's second-largest independent video game publisher, having acquired such blockbuster titles as "RollerCoaster Tycoon," "Civilization," "Test Drive" and "Unreal Tournament."
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