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Interim Government

WORLD
March 11, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
A powerful son of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, energized by recent military victories, vowed Thursday to press ahead with a military drive into opposition-held territory in the country's east, even as the government of France recognized the rebel-controlled interim government as the country's legitimate authority and the international community increased the diplomatic pressure on Tripoli. Meanwhile, a leader of the rebel government in Benghazi said the inexperienced and lightly armed rebels, many of them civilians firing weapons for the first time, have been reinforced with new weapons and by the arrival of special-forces cadets and soldiers who defected from the national army, including some retired military personnel.
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WORLD
February 28, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Sihem Hassaini, Los Angeles Times
The interim prime minister of the North African country that inspired the ongoing uprisings throughout the Arab world resigned Sunday after a new round of daily protests resulted in three weekend deaths. Interim President Fouad Mebazaa named Beji Caid Essebsi, a former foreign minister who served under Tunisia's long-ago President Habib Bourguiba, as new caretaker prime minister ahead of elections planned for the summer, state television reported. Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, who served in the same post under deposed President Zine el Abidine ben Ali, bowed to public pressure and unruly street protests demanding that any traces of the former regime be purged from public life.
WORLD
January 27, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Tunisia's interim government Wednesday issued arrest warrants for the country's deposed president and his entourage and launched a $350-million public spending program apparently aimed at countering demands for its leaders' dismissal. A Cabinet reshuffling was expected to be announced by early Thursday, in part also to mollify critics unhappy with some officials' links to the government ousted this month. A days-long protest by hundreds of people against the government of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, a holdover from the previous government, turned violent Wednesday when activists tussled with police officers firing tear gas. A few injuries were reported.
WORLD
January 27, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Facing mounting public pressure and the demands of a powerful labor union, Tunisia's interim government named 12 new ministers to the Cabinet late Thursday and removed those with ties to ousted authoritarian President Zine el Abidine ben Ali. Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, who served in the same post under Ben Ali, was among the few high-ranking officials to retain their positions. The ministers of defense, interior and foreign affairs, which are key posts, and nine others were replaced by figures considered independent.
WORLD
January 25, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
As Tunisia's top general warned that the country's revolution "risks being lost," the fragile transitional government was on the verge of a fresh crisis Monday over an issue that has dogged it from the start: the inclusion of politicians associated with the regime ousted this month. Political insiders and media reports said changes in the interim government of Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi were imminent, and officials were in talks late into the night. Ghannouchi held the same post under President Zine el Abidine ben Ali, who was driven from power after weeks of street protests.
WORLD
January 17, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Heavy gunfire erupted in the heart of Tunisia's capital on Sunday as the army appeared to be closing in on stalwarts of the regime driven from power last week and the interim government prepared to name a new Cabinet free of any major figures linked to deposed President Zine el Abidine ben Ali. Former Interior Minister Rafik Belhaj Kassim was taken into custody in his hometown of Beja, about 60 miles west of Tunis, the capital, a day after the...
WORLD
June 15, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The number of dead from ethnic rioting in Kyrgyzstan "should be multiplied several times" from the official toll of 176, said interim President Roza Otunbayeva, as tens of thousands of people fled to neighboring Uzbekistan and thousands more remained trapped Tuesday after that border was closed. Although the violence appeared to subside Tuesday, Otunbayeva said she was negotiating with Russian leaders to deploy Russian troops to the conflict zone in the country's south because the Kyrgyz army and police are unable to maintain order.
WORLD
June 12, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Ethnic violence that began as fistfights and escalated to raging gun battles broke out in the Central Asia nation of Kyrgyzstan, leaving at least 45 people dead and more than 600 injured, Russian news reports and an eyewitness said Friday. The clashes in the southern city of Osh began Thursday evening between several hundred Kyrgyz and Uzbek youths, said the witness, human rights activist Almaz Kalet. Combatants at first battled with fists, sticks and metal rods, but by about 2 a.m. Friday their numbers had grown to several thousand and they were fighting across the city center using automatic rifles, shotguns and other weapons, Kalet said in a telephone interview from Osh, where he lives.
WORLD
June 12, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Kyrgyzstan's government appealed to Russia on Saturday to send troops to the former Soviet republic in a desperate attempt to stop the ethnic riots that have rocked a southern city and left 77 people dead. Interim President Roza Otunbayeva said she had sent an official letter to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and discussed with Prime Minister Vladimir Putin the deteriorating situation in Osh, where residents described a city out of control. "We are waiting for news from the Russian Federation now," Otunbayeva said in televised remarks after the phone conversation with Putin.
WORLD
October 24, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Negotiators trying to resolve the Honduran political crisis said that talks had broken off, the third such announcement in the last week. The interim government declared the negotiations collapsed hours after making a new offer to the delegation representing ousted President Manuel Zelaya, which had set a midnight deadline for an agreement to reinstate him. Zelaya was ousted June 28 in a coup. Zelaya negotiator Victor Meza earlier in the day also said negotiations had broken down.
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