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International Association Of Machinists And Aerospace Workers

NEWS
November 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Relief was the underlying sentiment as Boeing Co. management and workers geared up for production after a 48-day strike by 57,800 machinists, but analysts said it will take a long time for the world's largest airplane manufacturer to catch up with lost production. In a late night vote Monday, members of the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers approved by an 81.
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NEWS
October 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal mediator in Seattle has called the Boeing Co. and striking Machinists union back to the bargaining table today in an effort to settle their month-old strike. The talks will be the first since Oct. 18, when the two sides met separately with mediator Doug Hammond and adjourned without agreement. About 58,800 members of the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, mainly in Washington, Oregon and Kansas, struck Oct. 4 over wages, benefits and mandatory overtime.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The president of the union representing 57,800 workers in the fifth day of a strike against the Boeing Co. accused the aerospace manufacturing giant Sunday of "stalling" and "playing games" about resuming negotiations. Tom Baker, president of Local 751 of the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, said he could not guess when the two sides will return to the bargaining table, although the union is prepared to meet as soon as Boeing presents a new proposal.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
SEATTLE-When the Boeing Co. took a nose dive 20 years ago, Seattle pretty much went with it. Some wag even erected a billboard on the outskirts of town, asking the last one leaving to please turn out the lights. But growing Pacific Rim trade, tourism and a steady stream of disgruntled Californians have helped the Puget Sound diversify in recent years. Now, the projected $25-million-a-week dent Boeing's current strike will put in the state's economy is being referred to as "just a blip."
BUSINESS
September 9, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Amid rumors about possible competing bidders, Los Angeles investor Marvin Davis said Friday that he signed a confidentiality agreement with UAL, the parent of United Airlines, allowing him to review the airline's financial documents. Shares of UAL continued to decline Friday, closing at $280.25, down $1.50, in moderate trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Traders blamed the decline on rumors a large UAL shareholder, New York financier Saul P.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines, has received takeover offers from Los Angeles financier Alfred A. Checchi and from Northwest's machinists union, bringing the number of known bidders to four. Details about the bids were not disclosed. As previously reported, NWA has also received bids from Pan Am Corp. and Los Angeles billionaire Marvin Davis. NWA, based in Eagan, Minn., is the fourth-largest U.S. airline and has a strong Pacific route system and valuable real estate in Japan.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writers
An investment group headed by former Baseball Commissioner Peter V. Ueberroth said Thursday that it would buy strikebound and bankrupt Eastern Airlines in a deal valued at $463.9 million. The agreement between Ueberroth and Texas Air Corp., which owns Eastern, was reached in a week of negotiations that almost collapsed several times.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge Wednesday ordered Eastern Airlines' striking machinists to stop harassing customers and employees who cross picket lines at New York's LaGuardia Airport. The airline accused the strikers of spitting at employees and passengers, of throwing nails in front of cars in attempts to puncture tires, of damaging cars in a variety of ways and of making threats and assaults. Eastern lawyers appeared Wednesday morning before Judge Burton R.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Eastern Airlines, declaring that it has run out of patience waiting for its picketing pilots to return to work, said Sunday that it will start hiring "permanent" replacements. In an ad in the Miami Herald, Eastern said it is looking for "people of exceptional talent and pride, pilots who will be part of the most exciting story in the airline industry." The airline warned potential candidates that "given the current strike . . .
NEWS
March 19, 1989
A Teamsters Union official threatened to expand the Eastern Airlines strike to rival Pan American World Airways, which competes with Eastern on the Boston-New York-Washington shuttle route. Meanwhile, Eastern employees rallied in Washington, New Jersey and New York, where Gov. Mario M. Cuomo threw his support behind the workers and challenged President Bush to intervene in the labor war with Eastern boss Frank Lorenzo.
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