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BUSINESS
June 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Zenith Data Unveils New Models: Zenith Data Systems introduced 40 new personal computer models as part of a newly revamped approach to a fiercely competitive international PC market. The Buffalo Grove, Ill.-based company said International Business Machines is also getting ready to announce new products made with Zenith under agreement with France's Cie Des Machines Bull, which owns Zenith.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Sun Microsystems Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. today will announce a Java operating system designed for network computers in a bid to define a standard that could help boost the fledgling NC market. The companies will collaborate on what they're calling Java OS for Business and will make it available to manufacturers at midyear, with products based on the software available next year.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Torrance-based International Technology said it has been awarded a $325-million Total Environmental Restoration Contract by the Army Corps of Engineers. . . . Premark International is poised to spin off Tupperware Corp., which had 1995 sales of $1.36 billion. . . . Woolworth said it will close its 109-store Accessory Lady chain by the end of September. . . . International Business Machines introduced a notebook computer that is slightly more than an inch thick and weighs 4.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Torrance-based International Technology said it has been awarded a $325-million Total Environmental Restoration Contract by the Army Corps of Engineers. . . . Premark International is poised to spin off Tupperware Corp., which had 1995 sales of $1.36 billion. . . . Woolworth said it will close its 109-store Accessory Lady chain by the end of September. . . . International Business Machines introduced a notebook computer that is slightly more than an inch thick and weighs 4.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an Aeromexico jetliner collided with a light plane over Cerritos in 1986--one of the deadliest air disasters in Southern California history--government safety investigators pinpointed an unlikely cause: the U.S. air traffic control system. The crash came as the government was in the early stages of developing a state-of-the-art computer system that was supposed to let controllers better handle air traffic in the nation's increasingly crowded skies.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Lee Dayton was anxious. It was early 1993, and IBM was bleeding red ink. Dayton, IBM's manager of real estate, ordered his staff to slash expenses for office space. They quickly responded, moving four employees into one wastefully big office. His. "I told my team that we'd better make an example of ourselves," the manager recalled, grinning. "They came up with a plan which required me to evict myself." Dayton's transfer to a smaller office in Stamford, Conn.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Digital Equipment to Cut 6,000 Jobs: The computer maker expects to cut up to 6,000 jobs in the current quarter that ends in December, part of a previously disclosed plan to dramatically shrink the company's payroll. Robert B. Palmer, president of the money-losing firm, has already said that Digital eventually expects to reduce its work force to under 90,000 employees over the next few years. Digital, based in suburban Maynard, Md.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER
Slowly but surely, International Business Machines--the company once known for it white-shirted, blue-suited ways--is loosening its tie. The latest evidence: Big Blue, which once permitted only the most up-market of retailers to handle its products, will sell personal computers on--egads!--the Home Shopping Network. Granted, the cable TV channel will be handling only a discontinued laptop computer, the L40 SX, a slow seller since its introduction early last year.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
There are reflections of the economic policies favored by Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton in the newly announced research collaboration among IBM, Toshiba of Japan and Siemens of Germany. But to understand that, you have to get past suggestions that the peaceable kingdom is at hand, with lions lying down with lambs, just because semiconductor and computer companies are making deals across borders and oceans.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines' announcement Monday that it will join Japan's Toshiba Corp. and Germany's Siemens to develop advanced computer chips demonstrates how nationalist competition is giving way to the recognition that overseas competitors often have complementary technical and financial strengths. As in another international venture announced Monday--a $700-million deal between Fujitsu and Advanced Micro Devices--sharing costs was a key factor in the IBM/Toshiba/Siemens deal.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered International Business Machines served notice Thursday that it's pulling out all the stops in an effort to preserve market share in the face of a continuing assault from vendors of IBM-compatible PCs. The world's largest computer company, suffering from slumping sales and a precipitous falloff in profitability, introduced a high-performance version of a key computer-on-a-chip and cut prices on many of its PCs.
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