Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInternational Conference On Population And Development
IN THE NEWS

International Conference On Population And Development

OPINION
August 14, 2002 | FRED SAI, Fred Sai is advisor to the president of Ghana on reproductive health and HIV/AIDS and on the board of directors of Population Action International.
Even from my office in Ghana, it was clear that the recent U.S. decision to cancel this year's contribution to the United Nations Population Fund had nothing to do with China's abortion policies and everything to do with politics. But that didn't stop my blood from boiling. How could one man--albeit the U.S. president--so easily wager human lives and human hopes for short-term political gain? This decision does nothing about China's population policies.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994 | From Religious News Service
Americans generally view world population growth as a problem and support U.S. efforts to slow the increasing numbers of Earth's inhabitants, according to a poll released Wednesday. But Roman Catholics and Protestants who attend church regularly are less likely to support specific policies such as legal abortion and family planning programs than other sectors of the electorate, the poll shows.
NEWS
December 4, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the budget now being haggled over in Congress for the U.S. Agency for International Development, about $400 million is earmarked for "child survival." But there may be less to this than meets the eye. This sum is supposed to pay for vitamin A supplements, promotion of breast-feeding, efforts to control deadly diarrhea and other U.S.-assisted international programs designed to cut down on child sickness and mortality worldwide.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | DAVID MAZIE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
At 26, Maria Elena is in no hurry to have children. The first woman in her family to complete college, she relishes her job as a guide in a Madrid museum. Rafael would like to marry his longtime girlfriend, but apartments are so expensive in Seville that the 31-year-old teacher still lives with his parents. These two young people help explain a major demographic shift. Spain, which just 20 years ago had one of the highest fertility rates in Europe, now has one of the lowest in the world.
NEWS
September 11, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delegates to the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women drafted a controversial provision Sunday calling on governments to review laws that penalize women for having illegal abortions. The delegates, members of a key subcommittee representing more than 70 countries, also approved a hotly debated measure that defines the right of a woman to make decisions about her own sexual and reproductive health as a basic human right.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Ogola, a Kenyan physician, spoke of the clinics she administers in rural Africa, where women are often hard-pressed to find an aspirin or an antibiotic but always have a ready supply of birth control pills. "You wake up in the morning, and you hear you're having too many babies. You go to bed at night, and you hear you're having too many babies," she sighed.
OPINION
December 2, 2012 | Malcolm Potts; Gopi Gopalakrishnan; J. Joseph Speidel; Kirsten Thompson; Leona D'Agnes; and Joan Castro; Martha Campbell; Djavad Salehi-Isfahani; William N. Ryerson; Carl Pope; John F. May; and Rajiv Shah
Hunger. Environmental degradation. Political instability. These were among the consequences of rapid global population growth documented in a five-part series in The Times in July. Now, Opinion has invited leading scholars to consider what, if anything, people and governments can do to address the issue. In the brief essays that follow, Malcolm Potts from UC Berkeley sets up the situation we are facing, and population experts from around the globe explain some of the approaches they've seen work -- and the reasons others have not. The series, by Times staff writer Kenneth R. Weiss and staff photographer Rick Loomis, can be found at latimes.com/populationrising.
OPINION
September 4, 1994 | Leila Conners, Leila Conners is associate editor of New Perspectives Quarterly and Global Viewpoint. She interviewed Nafis Sadik at the United Nations
More than 40 years ago, Nafis Sadik, a doctor, was required to ask her husband for his permission to go to work and practice medicine, as was the custom in Pakistan. This month, Sadik will lead the international community through a critical demographic crossroads. On the eve of the International Conference on Population and Development, to be held in Cairo this month, a 90% majority of U.N.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bathed in the smoke of a cooking fire inside a thatch-topped hut, Maureen Dick chatted softly in Shona as she carefully positioned her stethoscope and checked her patient's blood pressure. After a moment, she smiled. All was well. She reached into her bulging green satchel and handed over a month's supply of birth control pills. Edith Mayata thanked her warmly. At 34, she has six children and wants no more. "It's difficult to look after them," she said. "The cost of living goes up each day."
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finally clearing nagging disputes over reproductive health, birth control and migrant workers, U.N. drafters completed an ambitious new population plan Monday that U.N. officials say has allowed the world for the first time to deal frankly with sex and spiraling human reproduction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|