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BUSINESS
April 24, 1987
Boca Raton, Fla.-based International Controls Corp. received the $32-per-share offer from its CEO Arthur Goldberg and Bear, Stearns & Co. The company's stock jumped more than 20%, or 5 5/8, to 32 7/8 on the New York Stock Exchange on the news. The estimated value of the transaction for all the outstanding shares not already owned by Goldberg and the New York investment bank and brokerage house is $82 million. International Controls is a manufacturing and engineering concern.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1987
Boca Raton, Fla.-based International Controls Corp. received the $32-per-share offer from its CEO Arthur Goldberg and Bear, Stearns & Co. The company's stock jumped more than 20%, or 5 5/8, to 32 7/8 on the New York Stock Exchange on the news. The estimated value of the transaction for all the outstanding shares not already owned by Goldberg and the New York investment bank and brokerage house is $82 million. International Controls is a manufacturing and engineering concern.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 1985
Nortek terminated the offer because Transway International's board of directors agreed to a merger with International Controls Corp. The Transway board entered into the pact with a subsidiary of International Controls for $24 a share in cash and subordinated debentures worth another $24 a share. Transway spokeswoman Elizabeth Howard said there are 6.7 million outstanding shares of Transway stock. Providence, R.I.
NEWS
November 12, 1992
William M. Duke, 76, a corporate executive who specialized in turning around troubled firms. Duke, who most recently had his own consulting company, He served on various boards of directors including International Controls Corp., Teleflora, Erly Industries and many others. In the 1980s he figured in the financial reconstruction of Santa Monica-based Compucorp and prior to that headed Monrovia-based Micro-Z Corp. and Rusco Industries Inc. of Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1988 | Associated Press
A management-led group is offering to buy J. P. Stevens & Co. for $666.5 million, the company said Monday, but the textile giant's stock soared on speculation that higher bids would emerge. The management group said it would pay $38 in cash plus debt securities it valued at $5 for each of Stevens' 15.5 million outstanding common shares, the company announced. In nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues, Stevens soared $12.25 to close at $45.625 a share.
NEWS
January 8, 2000
Gaby Brimmer, 52, Mexican writer whose struggle with cerebral palsy inspired the 1987 movie "Gaby, a True Story." Brimmer was born in Mexico City, the daughter of Austrian Jewish emigres. She was afflicted from birth with cerebral palsy so severe that she was unable to speak and had movement only in her left leg and foot. With the help of a devoted nanny, she learned to communicate by pointing at letters on an alphabet board attached to the footrest of her wheelchair.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1985 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
To say they were awe struck in this modest ranch country town south of Dallas when Thomas W. Reid came out of nowhere in 1982 is to put it lightly. Reid bought the biggest ranch in the area sight unseen for $1.6 million, hung a giant "TWR" on its front gates, and started inviting people he met in town on free junkets to Las Vegas casinos where he was treated like a foreign potentate and gambled like one, too.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There may never have been, and there may never be, another "fugitive financier" quite like Robert L. Vesco. For one thing, Vesco always knew the value of a dollar--especially the millions of dollars he allegedly squirreled away without the consent of their previous owners. After more than two decades of living lavishly on the lam in and around the Caribbean, he seemed Friday to be headed for the waiting embrace of the Justice Department.
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