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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999
Syncor International Corp., Woodland Hills, reported net income for the third quarter ended Sept. 30 of $3.2 million up from $2.7 million for the same period last year. Revenues also rose to $131.5 million compared to $114.1 million. Syncor provides radiopharmceuticals, specialized pharmacy services and medical imaging services to the health-care industry.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1987 | ROBERT HANLEY
FHP International Corp. said net earnings during its fiscal 1987 second quarter, ended Dec. 31, rose 43% to a record $3 million from $2.1 million a year earlier. The Fountain Valley holding company for the FHP prepaid health plan said quarterly revenues increased 42%, to $90.2 million, from $63.4 million during the year-ago period. For the first half of its 1987 fiscal year, FHP said, net earnings increased 45% to a record $5.8 million from $4 million during the prior year's first half.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1991 | Dean Takahashi, Times Staff Writer
Donald R. Beall, a Corona del Mar resident and the top executive of an $11.9-billion company, no longer needs to take a helicopter to work. After moving its headquarters from El Segundo to Seal Beach last week, Rockwell surpassed Fluor Corp. as Orange County's biggest company. Despite a gloomy, short-term outlook, Beall expects the diversified technology company's revenue to grow at an average annual rate of 7%, including 2% a year in defense, through 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1994 | MATTHEW MOSK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Make no mistake about it, most people don't like to get up before a large group to give a speech. At least, that's what members of the six Conejo Valley chapters of Toastmasters International will tell you. Toastmasters is a group in which people learn to step up to the microphone with confidence. And members explain their involvement by reciting their view that the fear of public speaking outranks the fear of death 2-to-1.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The short, bearded man in a gray, double-breasted suit walked swiftly through a Long Beach medical clinic, pivoting often to point out cosmetic flaws that might mar the image of the health-care organization he spent a lifetime building. The clinic's young managers obediently took notes as Dr. Robert Gumbiner pointed scornfully to some tattered telephone directories, wheelchairs that obstructed a hallway and two pictures hung askew in a waiting room.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The short, bearded man in a gray, double-breasted suit walked swiftly through a Long Beach medical clinic, pivoting often to point out cosmetic flaws that might mar the image of the health care organization he spent a lifetime building. The clinic's young managers obediently took notes as Dr. Robert Gumbiner pointed scornfully to tattered telephone directories, wheelchairs that obstructed a hallway and two pictures hung askew in a waiting room.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ocean Pacific Sunwear is negotiating its sale to a San Francisco investment group, OP executives said Monday, and an agreement could come soon. The surf-wear licenser, once the giant of the industry, is involved in "substantial negotiation" with Berkeley International Capital Corp., said Michael Balmages, OP's senior executive vice president. "We are extraordinarily close to (signing) a letter of intent with them." No Berkeley representative could be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis
Peering through a gap in her black veil, Bibi Totia watched anxiously as the doctor examined her fussing grandson in a crowded refugee camp near the Pakistan border. The doctor diagnosed flu and handed her a prescription for an antibiotic from the free pharmacy. "God bless you," she said, clutching the precious piece of paper to her chest. For nearly a quarter of a century, Totia has relied on the doctors of the International Medical Corps to care for her family, first as a refugee in Pakistan and now as a refugee in her own country, Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All his life, Andre Malraux courted greatness. In 1996, 20 years after his death, he was accorded the French apotheosis of it. His remains were interred in the Pantheon to lie with those of Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo and Zola. But does he deserve to rest there? Or was he, as Simon Leys writes in the New York Review of Books, "essentially phony?" These are questions raised by Curtis Cate's entertaining biography of this strange and complicated man.
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