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WORLD
May 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- The International Criminal Court will hold a preliminary inquiry to decide whether a full investigation into Israel's deadly 2010 raid on a Turkish ship will be opened, according to a court statement Tuesday.  In May 2010, Israeli naval commandos intercepted the Mavi Marmara, a Turkish vessel that was the lead ship in a flotilla seeking to break the naval blockade Israel imposed on the Palestinian-ruled Gaza Strip. The incident turned violent and nine activists aboard the ship, mostly Turks, were killed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations' highest court on Monday ruled that Japan's Antarctic whaling operations are not for "scientific purposes" as Tokyo claims and ordered an immediate halt to the practice. In a 12-4 ruling, the International Court of Justice said Japan failed to demonstrate during a three-week trial last year that its claimed right to harvest about 1,000 whales each year was for scientific research. "The evidence does not establish that the program's design and implementation are reasonable in relation to achieving its stated objectives," the court's presiding judge, Peter Tomka, read from the ruling . The court ordered Japan to cease its whaling operations in the Southern Ocean "with immediate effect.
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WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- The Ukrainian parliament appealed Tuesday to the International Criminal Court in the Hague to try ousted President Viktor Yanukovich and other officials on charges of crimes against humanity. The parliament passed a measure seeking an international trial of the officials for actions "which led to especially dire consequences and mass murder of Ukrainian citizens in the course of the peaceful protest actions in the period from Nov. 21, 2013, to Feb. 22, 2014," the UNIAN news agency reported.
WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The International Criminal Court on Friday handed down the second conviction in its 12-year history, finding former Congolese warlord Germain Katanga guilty on four counts of war crimes and one count of crimes against humanity. Katanga, a leader of the Patriotic Resistance Force in Ituri, one of the myriad armed militias in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, was found guilty of being an accomplice to murders and pillage during a 2003 attack on the village of Bogoro.
OPINION
July 12, 2002
Why do the same people who insist that Al Qaeda terrorists must enjoy the full procedural protections of the U.S. Constitution also insist that American peacekeeping troops must not? Mitchell Keiter Oakland
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
In a move that could inject a new international actor into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the International Criminal Court will examine requests to investigate alleged war crimes during the recent combat in the Gaza Strip, its chief prosecutor said Wednesday. Luis Moreno-Ocampo, chief prosecutor of the Netherlands-based court, said he had decided to consider an investigation after the Palestinian Authority accepted the jurisdiction of the court last week.
OPINION
June 2, 2011 | By Timothy Garton Ash
At last they've got him. That Ratko Mladic is now sitting in the detention cell of an international tribunal in The Hague is a cause for unqualified celebration. The man directly responsible for the massacre of some 8,000 unarmed men and boys at Srebrenica will be held to account for that and other atrocities. This is another step forward in one of the great developments of our time: the global movement toward accountability. Just over 60 years ago, Czeslaw Milosz wrote a poem addressed to the torturers and mass murderers.
WORLD
November 20, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - In a ruling that gave each side some of what it wanted, the International Court of Justice in The Hague on Monday upheld Colombia's sovereignty over seven Caribbean islands but ordered that Nicaragua's maritime boundary be redrawn to give it more offshore territory. Ending a case that first came before the court in 1999, the ruling gives Nicaragua additional access to fishing grounds and potentially huge reserves of natural gas that Colombian government studies say reside below the ocean floor in the disputed area.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations' highest court on Monday ruled that Japan's Antarctic whaling operations are not for "scientific purposes" as Tokyo claims and ordered an immediate halt to the practice. In a 12-4 ruling, the International Court of Justice said Japan failed to demonstrate during a three-week trial last year that its claimed right to harvest about 1,000 whales each year was for scientific research. "The evidence does not establish that the program's design and implementation are reasonable in relation to achieving its stated objectives," the court's presiding judge, Peter Tomka, read from the ruling . The court ordered Japan to cease its whaling operations in the Southern Ocean "with immediate effect.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Adriana Leon and Chris Kraul
LIMA, Peru -- A territorial dispute between Chile and Peru ended Monday with an international court awarding Peru a triangle of Pacific Ocean territory covering thousands of square miles rich in fishing and other natural resources. Peru filed the claim at the International Court of Justice in The Hague in 2008, alleging that marine boundaries had never formally been set by the two countries. Chile's position was that the line had been defined in agreements signed in 1952 and 1954, which Peru argued were strictly fishing accords.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- The Ukrainian parliament appealed Tuesday to the International Criminal Court in the Hague to try ousted President Viktor Yanukovich and other officials on charges of crimes against humanity. The parliament passed a measure seeking an international trial of the officials for actions "which led to especially dire consequences and mass murder of Ukrainian citizens in the course of the peaceful protest actions in the period from Nov. 21, 2013, to Feb. 22, 2014," the UNIAN news agency reported.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Adriana Leon and Chris Kraul
LIMA, Peru -- A territorial dispute between Chile and Peru ended Monday with an international court awarding Peru a triangle of Pacific Ocean territory covering thousands of square miles rich in fishing and other natural resources. Peru filed the claim at the International Court of Justice in The Hague in 2008, alleging that marine boundaries had never formally been set by the two countries. Chile's position was that the line had been defined in agreements signed in 1952 and 1954, which Peru argued were strictly fishing accords.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
HOUSTON - A Mexican national facing execution in Texas this week has drawn support from Mexican officials, a former Texas governor and U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry, who appealed to Gov. Rick Perry and state courts for a reprieve - so far, unsuccessfully. Edgar Tamayo, 46, a Mexican citizen, is scheduled to be put to death Wednesday for fatally shooting Houston Police Officer Guy Gaddis in 1994. Gaddis, 24, had been flagged down near a nightclub by a man who accused Tamayo of robbing him. The officer arrested Tamayo, handcuffed him and put him in the back of his patrol car. The officer was driving away when Tamayo drew a pistol he had concealed and shot Gaddis three times in the back of the head.
WORLD
November 27, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Colombia on Wednesday recalled its ambassador to Nicaragua, a day after the Central American nation filed a complaint with an international court alleging Colombia "made threats of force" regarding disputed territory in the Caribbean. Although details of the alleged threats were not available Wednesday, Colombian Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzon acknowledged that “three or four” navy ships were patrolling the disputed area, insisting that they were there to combat drug trafficking and to “protect rights of Colombian citizens.” Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin said at a news conference that she was recalling ambassador Luz Stella Jara because “it is impossible to have a dialogue with Nicaragua.” In an earlier interview with Caracol Radio of Bogota, she described Nicaragua as “the worst neighbor” for allegedly failing to engage in bilateral talks as called for in September by President Juan Manuel Santos to hammer out a treaty covering access to the disputed territory.
WORLD
October 12, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - African Union leaders Saturday said that no sitting African leader should face trial by the International Criminal Court for heinous crimes. But African opponents failed to win support for a mass withdrawal from the ICC at an AU summit in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, on Africa's relationship with the court, according to news agencies. After the summit, AU officials suggested that Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta would withdraw his cooperation with the court based in The Hague in his upcoming trial for crimes against humanity.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A top African Union official said the International Criminal Court was a "political instrument" with a condescending approach to Africa, as African leaders gathered in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, to discuss the court. The extraordinary meeting to talk about the court's relationship with Africa comes with Kenya's president and vice president facing trial for crimes against humanity at the ICC in the Hague. Some East African officials are reportedly pressing for a mass withdrawal from the ICC. Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda have been deeply critical of the ICC, accusing it of bias.
WORLD
March 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Standing before the International Criminal Court on Tuesday for the first time, Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda denied he was guilty of a long list of wartime crimes. Ntaganda faces charges of forcing children to fight as soldiers and indirectly perpetrating murder, rape, attacks on civilians and other crimes against humanity. He was officially informed of the charges against him at the hearing Tuesday in the Hague. The warlord said he was not guilty before a judge interrupted and told him he did not yet need to enter a plea.
WORLD
October 4, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When the International Criminal Court was born 11 years ago, it may have seemed such an idealistic, noble idea that it could have leapt from the pages of a superhero comic book. It would be a place where the world's worst evildoers, no matter how powerful, would have nowhere to hide from justice. In the real world, though, it was never going to be easy to prosecute powerful governing leaders. From the start, critics called the court, based in The Hague, a neocolonial tool of the West and accused it of anti-African bias.
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