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BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Shan Li
Brazil is poised to triple oil production in the next two decades and become a top producer by 2035 if the country can develop its massive offshore reserves. Brazil could jump to No. 6 on the world's top producer list by 2035, up from 12th currently, according to the International Energy Agency.  The South American nation could account for a third of total growth in crude oil output by 2035 by tapping into the deep water fields beneath the Atlantic Ocean, the agency said. But one potential obstacle to development is government policy designed to encourage economic growth, which requires companies to buy local equipment and services.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2005 | From Reuters
The West's energy watchdog expects a rebound in global oil demand growth next year after a dip in 2005 when hurricanes knocked out U.S. rigs and refineries and sent prices to record highs. At the same time, the International Energy Agency said in its monthly Oil Market Report released Tuesday that supplies from nations outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries would sink to a six-year low this year. U.S. crude oil futures responded by jumping $1.73 to $63.53 a barrel.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Ronald D. White and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Step back, Saudi Arabia and Russia. The U.S. will become the world's top producer of oil by 2020, a net exporter of oil around 2030 and nearly self-sufficient in energy by 2035, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency. It's a bold set of predictions for a nation that currently imports some 20% of its energy needs. Recently, however, an "energy renaissance" has begun in the U.S., marked by a boost in oil, shale gas and bioenergy production made possible by new technologies such as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and horizontal drilling, said the report by the Paris agency, which acts as an energy watchdog for industrialized nations.
NEWS
November 20, 1986
Oil prices are not likely to rise above $20 a barrel before 1991 but could reach $35 by 1999, an International Energy Agency official said in Brussels. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the 13-nation Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries is unlikely to win back a significant share of the oil market it lost to independent producers until the late 1990s. Prices now range from $13 to $15 a barrel.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2006
* China's annual trade surplus is set to reach $150 billion this year, bursting past last year's record $109.8 billion as the country's exports continue to surge, a government report said. The report by the Commerce Ministry said exports were likely to hit $960 billion by the end of 2006, a 26% increase from 2005. * The International Energy Agency cut its estimates for global oil demand this year and next because of weaker-thanexpected consumption in China.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Shan Li
Brazil is poised to triple oil production in the next two decades and become a top producer by 2035 if the country can develop its massive offshore reserves. Brazil could jump to No. 6 on the world's top producer list by 2035, up from 12th currently, according to the International Energy Agency.  The South American nation could account for a third of total growth in crude oil output by 2035 by tapping into the deep water fields beneath the Atlantic Ocean, the agency said. But one potential obstacle to development is government policy designed to encourage economic growth, which requires companies to buy local equipment and services.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Oil supplies will remain tight despite record prices that have reduced demand, according to the International Energy Agency, and its executive director said Tuesday that the world was in the grip of its third "oil price shock." Downsizing its estimate of how much oil will reach the market, the IEA predicted that supply would exceed projected demand only by 2 million barrels a day -- a thin cushion. The IEA is the energy watchdog for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a grouping of the world's most-industrialized countries.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2010 | Bloomberg News
Chevron Corp. reported its largest profit increase in at least a decade, exceeding analyst estimates, after recovering economies around the world increased fuel demand. First-quarter net income more than doubled to $4.55 billion, or $2.27 a share, from $1.84 billion, or 92 cents, a year earlier, San Ramon, Calif.-based Chevron said Friday. Excluding severance costs, per-share profit was about $2.38, 43 cents higher than the average analyst estimate compiled by Bloomberg. Chevron Chief Executive John Watson boosted oil and natural-gas output by 4.5% with new wells from the Gulf of Mexico to Australia.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Iraq could overtake Russia as the world's second-largest oil supplier behind Saudi Arabia by the 2030s, nearly tripling its current output, according to a report from the International Energy Agency. In what the Paris-based group calls a “landmark study,” Iraq could double its production by the end of the decade, reaching 6.1 million barrels a day by 2020 from the 3 million barrels it currently turns out. The country, currently the third-largest oil exporter, could top 8.3 million barrels by 2035, making it “by far the largest contributor to global supply growth,” according to the report.
WORLD
August 30, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Iran has increased its stockpile of 20% enriched uranium by nearly a third since May, United Nations investigators reported Thursday, indicating that Tehran is pushing ahead with nuclear development despite tightening U.S. and European sanctions and the threat of an Israeli military strike. The International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency, also reported that Iran has doubled the number of centrifuges, which are used to enrich uranium, in an underground bunker near the holy city of Qom that experts say has been built to withstand an attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
When tens of thousands of antigovernment protesters filled Cairo's Tahrir Square for 18 tense days and toppled Egypt's brutal dictator early this year, Mohamed ElBaradei visited the street revolutionaries exactly once — briefly — and never went back. Since then, ElBaradei has made repeated appearances on American TV talk shows to portray himself as the leader of Egypt's opposition movement and to argue that he now should become the country's first freely elected president. Revisionism is a recurrent theme in ElBaradei's memoir, "The Age of Deception: Nuclear Diplomacy in Treacherous Times.
WORLD
June 2, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Japan did not properly protect its nuclear plants against the threat of tsunami before the March 11 disaster that caused radiation to spew from the Fukushima Daiichi facility, concludes a preliminary report released Wednesday by international nuclear experts. "The tsunami hazard for several sites was underestimated," says a three-page summary released by a United Nations nuclear safety team investigating the aftermath of a magnitude 9 earthquake that triggered a nearly 50-foot-high wall of water, deluging the plant.
WORLD
March 21, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The head of the U.N.'s atomic agency said Monday that the brewing crisis at Japan's reactors in the wake of the country's devastating earthquake and tsunami should lead officials around the world to reassess the international nuclear framework. "The agency's role in nuclear safety may need to be reexamined, along with the role of our safety standards," Yukiya Amano, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, said in a briefing to the agency's governing board. "It is already clear that arrangements for putting international nuclear experts in touch with each other quickly during a crisis need to be improved.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Japan's earthquake-stricken nuclear facilities are unlikely to suffer the kind of catastrophic accident that occurred in Chernobyl 25 years ago, the Japanese director-general of the U.N.'s nuclear agency said Monday. The design and structure of Japanese nuclear power plants are different from the Soviet-era facility where an April 26, 1986, explosion blew the roof off the northern Ukrainian complex's No. 4 reactor, unleashing a radiation cloud that swept across Europe and around the world.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2008 | the associated press
More than $1 trillion in annual investments to find new fossil fuels will be needed for the next two decades to avoid an energy crisis that could choke the global economy, the International Energy Agency said Wednesday. The warning from the Paris-based agency comes as major oil companies pull back investments amid the most severe economic downturn in a generation.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The West's energy watchdog said Friday that it sees no oil shortage developing in the next two months due to the U.N. embargo of Iraq and Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. "We are clear at least up to November," said Ulrich Engelmann, president of the International Energy Agency. "Then we are running into the winter season, which means a tight market."
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
The International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing updates on the damaged Japanese nuclear plants on its Facebook page. "Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency has informed the IAEA's Incident and Emergency Centre that there has been an explosion at the Unit 1 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, and that they are assessing the condition of the reactor core," the latest statement said. "The explosion was reported to NISA by the plant operator, TEPCO, at 0730 CET. Further details were not immediately available.
WORLD
September 7, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Iran has produced more than enough nuclear fuel to power two atomic warheads if it were to further enrich its supply and disregard its treaty obligations, according to a report issued Monday by the world's nuclear energy watchdog. At the same time, Iran's controversial efforts to master the enrichment of uranium at its production facility near the town of Natanz could be slowing or stalling, according to the quarterly report, which International Atomic Energy Agency Director-General Yukiya Amano delivered to his governing board ahead of a meeting next week.
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