Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInternational Longshore And Warehouse Union
IN THE NEWS

International Longshore And Warehouse Union

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 18, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Federal mediators hoping to settle a labor dispute between West Coast dockworkers and their employers are set to tour terminals in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and possibly others, early next week before calling both sides back to the bargaining table. Peter J. Hurtgen, director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, met Wednesday with negotiators for the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and Thursday with officials of the Pacific Maritime Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Michael Welles Shapiro
A California dockworkers union lodged an accusation for the second time in three months against APM Terminals for eavesdropping on workers to gain an edge in contract negotiations. The clerical workers' unit of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local No. 63 last week rejected contracts that were reached in December to end a strike at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the new complaint is another sign that tension between the union and management persists. In its original complaint filed Nov. 14, the Long Beach-based ILWU accused APM of conducting "secret surveillance, eavesdropping and snooping" on workers during the weeks leading up to an eight-day strike that shut down most of the cargo terminals at the busiest seaport complex in the country.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 3, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The longshore union and shipping industry reached a tentative agreement on technology -- the stickiest issue in their prolonged labor dispute -- early Friday, after all-night talks with three federal mediators and a top AFL-CIO official. No details were released on the deal, which many saw as a breakthrough in the stalemate that has disrupted commercial trade along the West Coast for more than a month.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
A small union of maritime clerks managed to shut down most of the nation's busiest seaport complex Wednesday, raising concerns about harm to the fragile economy. Although late November is a relatively slow time for cargo movement at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, a prolonged closure could prove costly for retailers and manufacturers who rely on the ports to get their goods as well as truckers and other businesses that depend on the docks for work. "You are stranding goods at ports that handle 40% of the nation's import trade," said Jock O'Connell, an international trade economist who works as an advisor to Beacon Economics.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Longshore union officials denied they were violating court orders by orchestrating slowdowns at West Coast docks, and told the Justice Department that the blame for continuing backlogs of cargo lies with the shipping lines. "The fact is our workers are ready, willing and able to work," said James Spinosa, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which has been in contract talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn., representing the shipping industry.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Negotiations between transpacific shipping companies and dockworkers continued as the three-year contract covering all U.S. ports along the West Coast expired at 5 p.m. Despite fears of work disruptions by some importers and exporters, both sides pledged to continue talking until they reach agreement, with the thorniest issues continuing to be health benefits and the introduction of technology. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Negotiators for the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents shipping lines and terminal operators, sat down with a federal mediator for the first time since contract talks broke down last month, leading to a crippling 10-day shutdown of all West Coast commercial ports. Peter J.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
After four months of tense negotiations, the dockworkers union and a group of shipping lines late Thursday blamed each other for a breakdown at the bargaining table that threatens to disrupt commerce at West Coast ports as early as today. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union hinted at an orchestrated slowdown. The union's negotiating committee Thursday urged all union members to follow all safety regulations. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2002 | From Times Staff
The shipping industry turned over to the Justice Department what it calls proof of a "concerted, systematic work slowdown" by the longshore union since West Coast ports were reopened under a federal court order Oct. 9. Despite an injunction calling for work to resume at "a normal and reasonable rate of speed," the Pacific Maritime Assn. said productivity per worker dropped by as much as a third in the first week after the docks reopened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking workers in the Port of Los Angeles shut down the nation's largest coal export terminal Thursday, amid charges that the operators are trying to undermine contract talks and discriminating against employees who are staunch union supporters. The action, which began Wednesday night, has halted cargo operations at the Los Angeles Export Terminal, leaving one ship stranded at the dock and several waiting in the harbor to be loaded.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The union representing West Coast dockworkers has formed an alliance with pilots who guide ships through the Panama Canal, a link-up that could boost the bargaining power of both unions. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union represents workers in the U.S. and Canada, including 50,000 longshore and other workers on the West Coast. The union has been concerned about the potential loss of cargo, jobs and collective bargaining power that could occur when the Panama Canal expansion opens in 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Ever since the 1930s, when Harry Bridges founded the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the legendary labor leader's name has conjured images of dockworker walkouts and bloody clashes with police on the picket lines in the hardworking port communities of Wilmington and San Pedro.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The threat of a crippling strike at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach lifted Thursday afternoon when both sides in the marathon labor contract negotiations gave ground that they had vowed to defend only a few hours earlier. Representatives of the office clerical unit of Local 63 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and some of the world's biggest oceangoing shipping lines and terminal operators shook hands at a Long Beach conference center on a tentative three-year deal.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
It looked like a typical Wednesday afternoon at the nation's largest seaport complex, but hanging over every crane lift and container stacking at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach was the threat of a strike. Early that morning, a representative for 17 of the world's biggest oceangoing shipping lines and the leader of the ports' unionized clerks -- who have been involved in extensive contract negotiations since July 1 -- declared that they were at an impasse.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
After a long day of proposals and counterproposals, union clerks at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach had yet to reach a contract agreement with shipping lines and terminal operators Monday night. But no new deadline for a strike was set. The 930-member office clerical unit, Local 63, of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union had vowed to strike just after midnight Sunday if no contract agreement had been reached with the 17 companies who employ them.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2007 | Ronald D. White
Contract negotiations between 17 of the world's largest shipping lines and terminal operators and a small but powerful labor union at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach continued late into the night Sunday. The two sides were seeking to reach accord on a labor contract ahead of a midnight deadline to avert a strike. The companies and the 930-member office clerical unit Local 63 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union remained far apart on wages and benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | PATRICK KERKSTRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined not to turn back and shunned by unionized dockworkers all along the West Coast of North America, a cargo ship loaded by nonunion workers in Australia is now entering its third week marooned in the waters off Long Beach. As a show of solidarity with unionized longshoremen Down Under, Port of Los Angeles dockworkers refused May 9 to unload any cargo from the Columbus Canada, a vessel laden with frozen beef and lamb that was put aboard by nonunion laborers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Talks between shipping lines and a clerks union were set to resume this afternoon after union negotiators agreed to remain at the table despite an earlier vow to strike if a deal wasn't reached by midnight Saturday. Representatives of the 930-member office clerical unit of Local 63 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union are in talks with shipping lines and terminal operators at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach over a new labor contract.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The union representing the 930 clerical workers who handle much of the paperwork involved in loading and unloading ships at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach said Friday that they would strike if a contract agreement was not reached by tonight at midnight. If the threat is carried out, thousands of other unionized dockworkers could honor the picket lines.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|