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BUSINESS
September 17, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Representatives from labor, management and the shipping industry are scheduled today to discuss the impact on local ports of the recently ratified labor agreement between longshore workers and the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents steamship lines and terminal operators along the West Coast. The three-year contract, approved Aug. 25 by the International Longshore & Warehouse Union, increases pay, health insurance and pension benefits.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Michael Welles Shapiro
A California dockworkers union lodged an accusation for the second time in three months against APM Terminals for eavesdropping on workers to gain an edge in contract negotiations. The clerical workers' unit of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local No. 63 last week rejected contracts that were reached in December to end a strike at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the new complaint is another sign that tension between the union and management persists. In its original complaint filed Nov. 14, the Long Beach-based ILWU accused APM of conducting "secret surveillance, eavesdropping and snooping" on workers during the weeks leading up to an eight-day strike that shut down most of the cargo terminals at the busiest seaport complex in the country.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
They were lined up by the score early Wednesday morning, even before the doors at the downtown post office in Long Beach opened for business. Standing in the queue were a 19-year-old who had just lost his minimum-wage job, a 63-year-old unemployed machinist and a 24-year-old single mom. They had all come for the same thing: the chance to apply for a temporary position at the booming twin ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, with starting pay at $20.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
A small union of maritime clerks managed to shut down most of the nation's busiest seaport complex Wednesday, raising concerns about harm to the fragile economy. Although late November is a relatively slow time for cargo movement at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, a prolonged closure could prove costly for retailers and manufacturers who rely on the ports to get their goods as well as truckers and other businesses that depend on the docks for work. "You are stranding goods at ports that handle 40% of the nation's import trade," said Jock O'Connell, an international trade economist who works as an advisor to Beacon Economics.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Michael Welles Shapiro
A California dockworkers union lodged an accusation for the second time in three months against APM Terminals for eavesdropping on workers to gain an edge in contract negotiations. The clerical workers' unit of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local No. 63 last week rejected contracts that were reached in December to end a strike at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the new complaint is another sign that tension between the union and management persists. In its original complaint filed Nov. 14, the Long Beach-based ILWU accused APM of conducting "secret surveillance, eavesdropping and snooping" on workers during the weeks leading up to an eight-day strike that shut down most of the cargo terminals at the busiest seaport complex in the country.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The union representing West Coast dockworkers has formed an alliance with pilots who guide ships through the Panama Canal, a link-up that could boost the bargaining power of both unions. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union represents workers in the U.S. and Canada, including 50,000 longshore and other workers on the West Coast. The union has been concerned about the potential loss of cargo, jobs and collective bargaining power that could occur when the Panama Canal expansion opens in 2014.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
A small union of maritime clerks managed to shut down most of the nation's busiest seaport complex Wednesday, raising concerns about harm to the fragile economy. Although late November is a relatively slow time for cargo movement at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, a prolonged closure could prove costly for retailers and manufacturers who rely on the ports to get their goods as well as truckers and other businesses that depend on the docks for work. "You are stranding goods at ports that handle 40% of the nation's import trade," said Jock O'Connell, an international trade economist who works as an advisor to Beacon Economics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Ever since the 1930s, when Harry Bridges founded the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the legendary labor leader's name has conjured images of dockworker walkouts and bloody clashes with police on the picket lines in the hardworking port communities of Wilmington and San Pedro.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
In an atmosphere resembling a low-budget game show, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began the process Thursday of turning more than 300,000 applications from around the world into 3,000 high-paying dockside jobs. Inside an auditorium at the L.A. port's administration building, a bin the size of a small school bus held hundreds of thousands of postcards mailed from across the nation and countries as distant as Serbia, Australia and Singapore.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Ocean shipping companies face a one-day West Coast port shutdown Tuesday as port workers intend to protest this week's World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle. The International Longshore & Warehouse Union plans the action to protest WTO's support of worldwide free trade, the Journal of Commerce first reported last week. A stoppage would halt port activity on the heaviest shipping day of the week in Southern California ports, the nation's busiest.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The union representing West Coast dockworkers has formed an alliance with pilots who guide ships through the Panama Canal, a link-up that could boost the bargaining power of both unions. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union represents workers in the U.S. and Canada, including 50,000 longshore and other workers on the West Coast. The union has been concerned about the potential loss of cargo, jobs and collective bargaining power that could occur when the Panama Canal expansion opens in 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Ever since the 1930s, when Harry Bridges founded the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the legendary labor leader's name has conjured images of dockworker walkouts and bloody clashes with police on the picket lines in the hardworking port communities of Wilmington and San Pedro.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Representatives from labor, management and the shipping industry are scheduled today to discuss the impact on local ports of the recently ratified labor agreement between longshore workers and the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents steamship lines and terminal operators along the West Coast. The three-year contract, approved Aug. 25 by the International Longshore & Warehouse Union, increases pay, health insurance and pension benefits.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of thousands of applications have poured in for 3,000 temporary jobs at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles -- about 10 times as many submissions as expected -- underscoring just how hungry people are for high-paying work in a weak labor market. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union was so concerned about the crush of applicants that it asked a mediator Tuesday whether the hiring process could be delayed to ensure that everything runs smoothly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The City Council on Friday told the federal government to stay out of the labor contract disputes at the port of Los Angeles and other West Coast harbors. The action came in response to reports that the Bush administration may invoke the Taft-Hartley Act to head off work stoppages. The Pacific Maritime Assn., representing the port operators, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, representing the dock workers, have been negotiating for a new contract since June.
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