Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInternational Monetary Fund
IN THE NEWS

International Monetary Fund

BUSINESS
September 22, 1990 | United Press International
The International Monetary Fund said the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic has joined the global lending organization. Czechoslovakia became the 152nd country to join the IMF.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Clinton administration officials appealed to the House not to put antiabortion language in an $18-billion bill for the International Monetary Fund. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin told reporters that national security could be compromised if the bill does not pass.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | Associated Press
Columbia University professor Karin Lissakers, 49, will be nominated to be U.S. executive director of the International Monetary Fund, President Clinton has announced. If Lissakers is confirmed by the Senate, she will represent the United States on the 24-member board, which sets policy for the IMF.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1998 | Reuters
A key U.S. congressional panel voted to give the International Monetary Fund $3.4 billion, a fraction of the $18 billion the White House says the IMF needs to help deal with global financial emergencies. Despite warnings that IMF cash reserves are depleted, the House Appropriations' foreign operations subcommittee approved, by voice vote, only $3.4 billion for the lending agency as part of a $16.2-billion spending package.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Coal miners blocked the Trans-Siberian railroad for a sixth day in the most visible sign of a cash crunch that has the nation racing against the clock to secure a bailout from the international community. The government said it expected the International Monetary Fund to decide within a month on a new credit package worth $10 billion to $15 billion, which would allow the nation to meet its obligations.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The International Monetary Fund won new powers to police the world economy after its 184 member countries endorsed a framework to monitor how the economic policies of one country affects others. The countries, represented by finance ministers or central bank governors, also agreed that some emerging economies needed more say in IMF decision-making. "We resolve to make the IMF more fit for purpose in a global economy," said Gordon Brown, Britain's finance minister.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|