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WORLD
May 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
The Israeli military arrested two members of the pro-Palestinian International Solidarity Movement, including an American, along with an Australian employee of Human Rights Watch in a Friday raid on a solidarity movement office in the West Bank town of Beit Sahour, police and an activist said.
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OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "Judge rules for Israel in U.S. activist's death," Aug. 29 Rachel Corrie's death in Gaza beneath an Israeli bulldozer was indeed tragic, but we shouldn't blame the victim. Or the bulldozer operator. Or the Israeli judicial system. The real culprit in this tragedy is the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), a pro-Palestinian group that sends young activists into a dangerous military zone to place their bodies in front of condemned Palestinian homes. The rationale is the belief that somehow a Westerner's life is more valuable than an Arab's.
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OPINION
August 30, 2012
Re "Judge rules for Israel in U.S. activist's death," Aug. 29 Rachel Corrie's death in Gaza beneath an Israeli bulldozer was indeed tragic, but we shouldn't blame the victim. Or the bulldozer operator. Or the Israeli judicial system. The real culprit in this tragedy is the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), a pro-Palestinian group that sends young activists into a dangerous military zone to place their bodies in front of condemned Palestinian homes. The rationale is the belief that somehow a Westerner's life is more valuable than an Arab's.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
The American parents sit stoically in a sky-lit courtroom, listening to testimony about how an Israeli military bulldozer crushed their daughter to death seven years ago. They hear about the dangerous game of chicken played for several hours that winter afternoon in 2003, between bulldozers and international activists trying to protect Palestinian homes, before Rachel Corrie disappeared under a creeping mound of dirt. Now her parents, calling an Israeli investigation that found no fault a "whitewash" and suspecting that the bulldozer driver deliberately ran over their daughter, are pursuing a civil lawsuit against the government.
OPINION
May 25, 2002
I was impressed by your story of Kristen Schurr, reporting on the group from the International Solidarity Movement that brought food into the besieged Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem ("U.S. Backers of Palestinian Cause Protest Their Treatment by Israel," May 19). Schurr reported that, although an American citizen, she was assaulted by Israeli troopers, jailed for a week without charges and forced to fly home without most of her belongings. As a U.S. taxpayer supporting the Israeli army to the tune of $3 billion to $4 billion a year, I am directly complicit in that violation of her human rights, especially in a nation that calls itself "the only democracy" in the Middle East.
WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
The American parents sit stoically in a sky-lit courtroom, listening to testimony about how an Israeli military bulldozer crushed their daughter to death seven years ago. They hear about the dangerous game of chicken played for several hours that winter afternoon in 2003, between bulldozers and international activists trying to protect Palestinian homes, before Rachel Corrie disappeared under a creeping mound of dirt. Now her parents, calling an Israeli investigation that found no fault a "whitewash" and suspecting that the bulldozer driver deliberately ran over their daughter, are pursuing a civil lawsuit against the government.
OPINION
April 26, 2003
In "In West Bank, a Risky Quest for Peace" (April 21), you mention Israel's practice of bulldozing the homes of Palestinian families. Thank you for your honest reporting. It is rare that I see the truth spoken about this dirty little Israeli secret: Palestinian apartheid. Perhaps you could do another piece letting your readers know that while they may realize apartheid is dead in South Africa, it is alive and well in the occupied Palestinian territories. As long as U.S. taxpayers give $2 billion a year to the Israeli military machine, which must be spent on U.S.-made weapons and weapons systems, we will be looked upon as being in bed with that occupying power.
WORLD
March 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Israel's Supreme Court ordered the military to reopen the case of a U.S. activist who accused Israeli troops of seriously wounding him in the West Bank without provocation. Brian Avery, 26, of Chapel Hill, N.C., was shot in the face in Jenin on April 5, 2003. He was part of a contingent from the International Solidarity Movement, a pro-Palestinian group.
WORLD
March 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The family of Rachel Corrie, an American killed in the Gaza Strip while trying to stop an Israeli army bulldozer from destroying a Palestinian home, has sued Israel's government for $324,000, the Haaretz newspaper reported. Corrie, 23, a member of the pro-Palestinian International Solidarity Movement, was killed in March 2003. The army said the bulldozer driver never saw her, but Corrie's family says she was wearing bright clothing and had identified herself as a foreign activist.
WORLD
June 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Israel's military prosecutor has exonerated Israeli soldiers in the death of an American activist crushed to death by an army bulldozer in the Gaza Strip. Rachel Corrie, 23, of Olympia, Wash., died March 16 trying to block the demolition of a doctor's house in the Rafah refugee camp by standing in front of the bulldozer. The army said the home was being destroyed in an effort to block arms smuggling.
WORLD
May 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
The Israeli military arrested two members of the pro-Palestinian International Solidarity Movement, including an American, along with an Australian employee of Human Rights Watch in a Friday raid on a solidarity movement office in the West Bank town of Beit Sahour, police and an activist said.
OPINION
April 26, 2003
In "In West Bank, a Risky Quest for Peace" (April 21), you mention Israel's practice of bulldozing the homes of Palestinian families. Thank you for your honest reporting. It is rare that I see the truth spoken about this dirty little Israeli secret: Palestinian apartheid. Perhaps you could do another piece letting your readers know that while they may realize apartheid is dead in South Africa, it is alive and well in the occupied Palestinian territories. As long as U.S. taxpayers give $2 billion a year to the Israeli military machine, which must be spent on U.S.-made weapons and weapons systems, we will be looked upon as being in bed with that occupying power.
OPINION
May 25, 2002
I was impressed by your story of Kristen Schurr, reporting on the group from the International Solidarity Movement that brought food into the besieged Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem ("U.S. Backers of Palestinian Cause Protest Their Treatment by Israel," May 19). Schurr reported that, although an American citizen, she was assaulted by Israeli troopers, jailed for a week without charges and forced to fly home without most of her belongings. As a U.S. taxpayer supporting the Israeli army to the tune of $3 billion to $4 billion a year, I am directly complicit in that violation of her human rights, especially in a nation that calls itself "the only democracy" in the Middle East.
WORLD
January 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
An Israeli soldier has been arrested for shooting and critically wounding a British man in April in the Gaza Strip, the Israeli military said Wednesday. Tom Hurndall, a 22-year-old university student, was shot in the head in the Rafah refugee camp while with the International Solidarity Movement, a pro-Palestinian group whose activists offer to serve as buffers between Israeli soldiers and Palestinians.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Rushdi Abu Alouf
GAZA CITY -- A Hamas military court Tuesday reduced the sentences for two militants convicted in the 2011 killing of Italian activist Vittorio Arrigoni from life imprisonment to 15 years. The Supreme Military Court accepted an appeal from Mahmoud Salfiti and Tamer Husasna, former police officers who were convicted in September in the kidnapping and murder of Arrigoni. Arrigoni, 36, a longtime member of the pro-Palestinian International Solidarity Movement, was kidnapped on April 14, 2011, by a previously unknown group of Islamist extremists.
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