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International Space Station

SCIENCE
May 10, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Astronauts from the International Space Station will start their space walk Saturday about 5:45 a.m. Pacific time, in an effort to locate and fix an ammonia leak in a coolant system, NASA officials said Friday. The unscheduled emergency walk was "precedent setting" for the station, although similar impromptu tasks had been performed during the Space Shuttle program, said Norm Knight, NASA chief flight director. “The team is ready to go,” International Space Station program manager Michael Suffredini said.
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SCIENCE
May 10, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
  Astronauts on the International Space Station may take a spacewalk Saturday to repair an ammonia leak. The gas, used to cool one of the station's solar arrays, began oozing from the left side of the station's truss structure Thursday, officials said. NASA reported that the six-member Expedition 35 crew, commanded by Chris Hadfield, was not in danger, and that the station is operating normally while crew members and mission managers work to reroute power through another of the station's eight power channels.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Sens. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) took a break from earthly political matters Tuesday to talk to NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, one of two Americans aboard the International Space Station. Marshburn, who has been at the space station since December 2012, said that his experience has given him a newfound appreciation for his home planet. “I wish every head of state could see the Earth from the cupola,” he said, praising the planet's beauty, nuance and lack of borders from his exceptionally high vantage point.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Happy Earth Day, Earthlings. For Earth Day 2013, take a moment to appreciate your home for what it is -- a blue pinpoint on a vast black canvas. In a 2009 post on NASA Science, Dauna Colter wrote about the 40-year anniversary of Apollo 11, and her words -- and a historic picture from 1969 -- resonate today. The photo, taken by astronaut Bill Anders, showed Earth rising over the moon's horizon. The effects of that image were deeply felt. "For the first time in history, humankind looked at Earth and saw not a jigsaw puzzle of states and countries on an uninspiring flat map," Colter wrote, "but rather a whole planet uninterrupted by boundaries, a fragile sphere of dazzling beauty floating alone in a dangerous void.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
In its maiden flight to space, a commercially built 13-story rocket blasted off from a launch pad off the coast of Virginia in a test mission for NASA. The Antares rocket, developed by Orbital Sciences Corp., roared into orbit after launching Sunday at 2 p.m. Pacific time from the newly built Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. PHOTOS: Orbital Sciences sends Antares to orbit Although it was simply a test flight to reach orbit, the successful launch was another crucial step in NASA's plan to hand off space missions -- carrying cargo and crews -- to private industry now that the space shuttle fleet has been retired.
SCIENCE
April 19, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Live video by Ustream Two Russian astronauts donned spacesuits Friday morning and climbed outside of the International Space Station to conduct a little space station maintenance. NASA is streaming the spacewalk live, and you can watch it live, right here. The two cosmonauts, Roman Romanenko, 41, and Pavel Viogradav, 59, opened the hatch of the ISS at 7:03 a.m. PDT Friday, and their spacewalk is estimated to last a total of six hours.  By venturing on this spacewalk, Viogradav becomes the oldest person to make a spacewalk, the Associated Press reports . Romanenko is a second-generation spacewalker.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
What happens when you wring a sopping wet washcloth out in space? Well, here's a hint: It's much more interesting than what happens here on Earth. This week, commander Chris Hadfield, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station, demonstrated what happens when you get a washcloth soaking in space and then wring it out. The experiment, called "Wring It Out" was designed by two 10th-graders in Nova Scotia. Kendra Lamke and Meredith Hatfield won a contest sponsored by the Canada Space Agency to come up with an experiment for an astronaut to perform in micro-gravity.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Orbital Sciences Corp.'s launch of its new Antares rocket has been put on hold due to a technical issue that popped up when countdown was about 12 minutes away. The 13-story rocket was expected to blast off from NASA's little-known Wallops Flight Facility in eastern Virginia at 2 p.m. Pacific time in its maiden flight to space in a test mission for NASA. But Orbital said it had to abort the launch when an umbilical line to the second stage prematurely fell off while the rocket was on the launch pad. "The teams are still gathering data," the company tweeted . "Most probable next attempt will be Friday, April 19 at 1700 EDT. We will provide confirmation soon.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
On a little-known launch pad off the coast of Virginia, a team of about 200 engineers and technicians is readying a 13-story rocket for its maiden flight to space in a test mission for NASA. The Antares rocket, developed by Orbital Sciences Corp., is going through final preparations for a 2 p.m. Pacific time blastoff planned for Wednesday. The eyes of the U.S. government will be on the launch to see whether the two-engine booster has the right stuff. NASA has invested about $288 million in seed money to help the Dulles, Va., company develop its technology, and has an additional $1.9 billion on the table with a contract for eight flights to transport cargo to the International Space Station in the coming years.
SCIENCE
April 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
    Has an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected a sign of dark matter? Scientists have been on pins and needles since Samuel Ting, an MIT physicist and Nobel laureate who leads the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment, coyly demurred from discussing his cosmic ray experiments' findings at a meeting in February, saying they'd be ready to discuss the results in a matter of weeks. With the results now being released by Physical Review Letters, he's set to discuss the findings at a 10:30 a.m. NASA briefing this morning, which you can watch in the video above.
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