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International Students

NEWS
February 12, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to raise additional money for their cash-strapped campuses, many California community colleges are recruiting foreign students, who provide added revenues because they pay higher fees. To compete for these students, some schools are spending thousands of dollars on overseas recruiting trips, advertisements and college brochures. Despite the hefty cost, school officials believe their attempts to lure more foreign students are well worth the investment.
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OPINION
May 21, 2013 | By Linda P.B. Katehi
As an immigrant and an engineer, I know the magnetic pull that the United States exerts on anyone who dreams of a career in science. From the time I watched NASA technicians on television during the first lunar landing in 1969, I resolved to get the best scientific education that my talents and circumstances would allow. That quest initially took me to National Technical University in Athens, where I became the first person in my family - and the first woman from Salamis, the Greek island where I grew up - to earn a college degree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
As their countries headed toward victory and disappointment in the final hour of the much-anticipated Cricket World Cup 2011 semifinal match, Waleed Ishtiaq and Nikunj Jajodia were dozing side by side. Wearing their respective countries' team colors — green for Pakistan and blue for India — the 20-year-old USC students had nodded off in their chairs at an on-campus screening of the game. Not even the intermittent cheering of their compatriots could rouse them. It was past 10 a.m. Wednesday in Los Angeles when India took the prize, after a nail-biting eight-hour contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1998
International students composed just 10% of the student population at USC but represented 46.7% of those accused of "academic dishonesty"--cheating--according to a report by the school's Office for Student Conduct. The report details the 152 complaints against students for violations including plagiarism, copying assignments and using surrogates for taking tests--which carried punishments ranging from warnings to expulsion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2009 | Larry Gordon
For the eighth consecutive year, USC enrolled the highest number of foreign students of any U.S. university last year, a new report shows. USC, which recruits strongly in Asia, had 7,482 international students in the 2008-09 school year, according to the study by the Institute of International Education with support from the State Department. In all, USC enrolls about 34,000 undergraduate and graduate students. New York University, with 6,761, had the second-largest international contingent and Columbia University, with 6,685, ranked third.
OPINION
August 27, 2003 | Catharine Stimpson, Catharine Stimpson is dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Science at New York University.
The Sept. 11 attacks rightly marshaled America against terrorism. Unfortunately, however, the government's zeal has created one of the most serious conflicts between security and freedom in our nation's history -- and its effects will be evident on college campuses, among other places, this fall. As a New York University educator, I am unusually anxious about the start of this academic year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly three years ago, some skeptics doubted Community College Chancellor Philip Westin when he plunked down $300,000 to start an experimental program increasing the number of international students. But the decision to transfer Oxnard College President Elise Schneider to a new job as the program's provost and pay her more than $100,000 annually to travel around the globe has proved a sound investment for the Ventura County Community College District. Last year, the program brought in $1.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | LAUREL SHAPER WALTERS, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
As a young student in Singapore, Sharon Lai decided she'd like to attend college in the United States. Although she didn't have a specific school in mind, she had an idea of where to look. "I had heard that Boston was a university town," Sharon says, explaining that she focused on schools in the area. Today, she's a sophomore at Boston University. Sulochana Vivekananthan, a BU senior from Sri Lanka, attended Wesley College in Dover, Del., for her freshman year.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | JOHN L. MITCHELL and DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two 19-year-old Marymount College students--one a Japanese national and the other a U.S. citizen who grew up in Japan--were on life support Saturday and not expected to survive after being shot by a gunman during a carjacking outside a San Pedro supermarket. In a crime that sparked immediate outrage in Japan, Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura were each shot in the head with a handgun about 11 p.m.
OPINION
January 3, 2010 | By Irving R. Epstein
At most universities, freshman chemistry, a class I've taught for nearly 40 years, is the first course students take on the road to a career in the health professions or the biological or physical sciences. It's a tough course, and for many students it's the obstacle that keeps them from majoring in science. This is particularly true for minority students. In 2005, more than two-thirds of the American scientific workforce was composed of white males. But by 2050, white males will make up less than one-fourth of the population.
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