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OPINION
December 5, 1999
Robert Hahn's Nov. 29 commentary, "Let the Market Control Faster Access to the Internet," reveals the specious arguments of those who insist that "open access" is the only way to prevent a cable monopoly of the Internet. Access to the Internet can be achieved by a number of means--cable, digital subscriber lines, satellite or traditional dial-up phone lines. Proponents of open access--funded mainly by Baby Bells, GTE and America Online--know this full well; yet they cynically manipulate the public in order to slow down the cable competition until they can roll out their DSL. As Hahn points out, the phone companies have had this technology for years but didn't implement it until broadband cable came on the market.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has acquired New Mexico-based drone maker Titan Aerospace, the company said on Monday. The Mountain View tech giant did not say how much it paid for the start-up, which specializes in building drones capable of staying in sky for years on end. “Titan Aerospace and Google share a profound optimism about the potential for technology to improve the world," a Google spokesman said. "It's still early days, but atmospheric satellites could help bring Internet access to millions of people, and help solve other problems, including disaster relief and environmental damage like deforestation.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2009 | David Lazarus
Comcast Corp.'s chief executive, Brian Roberts, was gushing last week about his company's impending takeover of NBC Universal, saying the deal would give consumers what they want, "which is access to all different types of content on different platforms and different times." That's not the half of it -- but it may not be Comcast in the driver's seat. If federal regulators have their way, the next big thing on the tech horizon will be a brave new world of Internet-ready, work-with-any-network set-top boxes, offering consumers unprecedented multimedia options through their TVs, not just their computers.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday announced the Facebook Connectivity Lab, a division within his company that is working with drones, satellites and lasers to bring Internet connectivity to those who don't yet have it. The effort is a part of Internet.org, a global partnership that was launched last year with the mission of connecting everyone on the planet to the Internet. "Our goal with Internet.org is to make affordable access to basic Internet services available to every person in the world," Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post . VIDEO: Unboxing the HTC One (M8)
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg has announced a partnership called Internet.org designed to deliver Internet access to the billions of people around the globe.  Whether it's born out of noble intentions to create a more equitable world or simply to expand Facebook's addressable market, I'll leave others to debate. The initiative is noteworthy because it raises some important issues about the way the Internet potentially divides us socially and economically, a subject that all too rarely gets discussed.  It's an ambitious idea.
WORLD
November 30, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Syria was plunged into Internet darkness Thursday and much of the nation's telephone service was cut as fighting raged on the main road between Damascus and the capital's international airport. It could not be immediately determined whether the Internet blockage and the cutoff in telephone service were deliberate acts or the result of a power outage or damage to cables or other equipment. Fighting has engulfed several districts near the capital in recent weeks. Both sides reported clashes along the airport road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1999
Robert Scheer got it wrong when he accused AOL of wanting it both ways regarding government intervention in the Internet (Column Left, July 27). In the very near future consumers will be using broadband services to connect to the Internet. Decisions made today about broadband connections will have far-reaching implications for the future shape of the Internet. Whether broadband access and architecture are open and competitive or closely controlled by a cable monopoly will affect whether free and diverse speech continues to thrive, whether noncommercial and civic content is accessible, whether local e-commerce is sustainable and the cost, availability and service choices for consumers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000
In the battle over high-speed Internet services, the term "open access" has returned to the Los Angeles lexicon. Today, City Councilman Alex Padilla will announce what may be the best method yet for preventing cable companies' monopoly power over who can use their technology. Padilla's proposal would give the city plenty of time--18 months--to respond to the results of a number of legal battles on the issue.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
SAN FRANCISCO - Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg's ambitious plan to provide Internet access to billions of people around the globe will face challenges that extend far beyond solving technical and financial issues. In announcing a partnership dubbed Internet.org, Zuckerberg outlined several technology-based strategies for reducing costs in order to extend affordable Internet service to 5 billion people around the globe who are not currently online. But nonprofit groups that have been focused on bridging the global digital divide have reported that such efforts inevitably run into problems including economics, culture, education and corruption.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | Jack Searles
Explorer Communication, a Simi Valley producer of computer fax-modem systems, has joined forces with a San Jose company to provide Internet access to laptop computer users. The agreement calls for Explorer to combine its fax-modem cards with the software of the Northern California firm, NETCOM On-Line Communication Services Inc. The deal marks a marketing departure for Explorer, which previously sold its products largely through mail-order merchants.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- The hottest ticket at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain: Mobile king Mark Zuckerberg. The Facebook chief executive, fresh off his empire-building move to buy popular mobile messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion, took the stage at the largest mobile conference to talk up his vision for connecting billions more people. Top of mind for everyone there: The 450 million users who come with Zuckerberg's expensive acquisition of WhatsApp. Zuckerberg said Facebook bought WhatsApp because of a shared vision to connect the planet.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix has agreed to pay Comcast to ensure the subscription service's movies and TV shows stream seamlessly in a deal that underscores the power of distribution in the digital era - and could mean higher rates for consumers. The nation's leading online video service and the largest U.S. provider of home Internet access said the agreement is designed to ensure that Netflix subscribers can watch the new season of "House of Cards" and other content free of the pauses and hiccups subscribers have reported in recent months.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Google has unveiled an ambitious plan to expand its blazing-fast Internet service to millions of people in 34 more U.S. cities in the clearest sign yet that the Internet giant plans to challenge cable and phone companies in what could become a lucrative stand-alone business. Google said it would begin working with government officials in some of the nation's largest cities, including San Jose, Phoeniz, Atlanta and Portland, Ore., to explore extending Google Fiber there.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg took to his social network early Tuesday to look back on how his company came to be so successful. Zuckerberg, who launched the company when he was just a 19-year-old student at Harvard, said he never imagined that Facebook would be what it is now. There was a need to connect the world through one service, he said, and he and his company cared deeply about doing that. "When I reflect on the last 10 years, one question I ask myself is: Why were we the ones to build this?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The nation's second-largest school district is woefully unprepared to administer new state standardized tests by computer, a survey of Los Angeles Unified schools has found. An internal district report, obtained by The Times through a California Public Records Act request, indicates that fewer than a third of Los Angeles schools said they were ready for this spring's tests, which for the first time will be given online. The survey comes amid a $1-billion effort to provide every student, teacher and administrator with an iPad or other computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Library funding in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, may be diverted to a new jail thanks to a legislator who doesn't approve of the library's programs. Jail proponent and chair of the Lafourche Parish Council Lindel Toups supports a ballot measure that would take funding away from libraries. “They're teaching Mexicans how to speak English,” Toups told the local Tri-Parish Times , referencing Biblioteca Hispana, a Spanish-language section of one of the nine branch libraries. “Let that son of a bitch go back to Mexico.
OPINION
September 5, 2013 | By the Times Editorial Board
The battle over federal "net neutrality" rules resumes Monday when a federal appeals court takes up the challenge filed by one of the country's largest Internet service providers: Verizon. The phone company, which argues that the Federal Communication Commission's rules violate federal law and the Constitution, asserts that ISPs have a 1st Amendment right to edit or block the data flowing from websites to their customers. The company's stance is strange and self-contradictory, considering its long-standing efforts to be freed from liability for the "speech" that travels through its wires.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg has announced a partnership called Internet.org designed to deliver Internet access to the billions of people around the globe.  Whether it's born out of noble intentions to create a more equitable world or simply to expand Facebook's addressable market, I'll leave others to debate. The initiative is noteworthy because it raises some important issues about the way the Internet potentially divides us socially and economically, a subject that all too rarely gets discussed.  It's an ambitious idea.
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