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Internet Corp For Assigned Names And Numbers

BUSINESS
April 3, 2001 | From Reuters
The Internet's top naming authority on Monday modified VeriSign Inc.'s control over domain name suffixes but allowed it to keep its thumb on .com and .net for decades if it follows the rules. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, limited the term of VeriSign's rights to the .org name to the end of 2002 but gave it the chance to keep the .com suffix after its agreement expires and to contend for the .net name after its control ends in 2006. Mountain View, Calif.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
By the end of this year, addresses on the Web might be allowed to use new suffixes such as .shop, .tel and .news in addition to existing suffixes such as .com and .org. But how many more suffixes or how they will be used remains to be worked out. The resolution was passed unanimously Sunday by the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers's 19-member board at a conference in Japan. Some praised it as a boon to companies that register and sell the Internet labels.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
The group that oversees Internet addresses finalized changes Thursday that end direct elections to its board of directors -- a move critics say could make the group indifferent to ordinary users and hurt innovation. The steps are part of an organizational overhaul meant to improve the efficiency of the nonprofit Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, which is based in Marina del Rey.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
While the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers made news last week for approving seven new suffixes that will join the ubiquitous .com, the Los Angeles-based group also gained attention for some of the suffixes it didn't OK. Of the more than 100 proposals received by the group known as ICANN, one of the most desirable was .web. Three companies submitted applications for the right to assign Web and e-mail addresses ending in .web.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than 10 days before the transition to a fully competitive system for registering Internet domain names, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers accused Network Solutions Inc. of trying to thwart the process to protect its business. Until this month, Herndon, Va.-based Network Solutions was the only company able to register domain names ending in .com, .org and .net.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dozens of firms are eager to compete with Network Solutions Inc. in the lucrative business of registering Internet domain names, the cyberspace addresses that end in .com, .net and .org. But in an ironic twist, NSI's monopoly could be extended beyond its expected end date in early November because of protests from the company's competitors. Ten firms are critical of an agreement reached last month by Network Solutions, the Clinton administration and the Internet Corp.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | KIM GAMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The U.S.-based agency that oversees Internet names worldwide was criticized Sunday for not approving new addresses fast enough as demand grows among Web surfers from California to China. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, which was selected by the U.S. government in 1998 to regulate the system of domain names, took up the subject at its quarterly meeting in Stockholm as it faces growth in unsanctioned suffixes such as ".wine" and ".god."
BUSINESS
March 9, 2001 | From Reuters
In a sign that its dominance of the domain name registration market may be on the wane, Network Solutions Inc. was passed by two upstart registrars in one measure of the race to sign up consumers to new domain names, according to a report posted this week by the Web's premier naming authority. Executives at VeriSign Inc.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of IncrediblyLongWebAddresses.com? Relief may be coming soon. The group that oversees the Internet addressing system is poised to clear the way for several new Net suffixes to alleviate the burden on .com, .net and .org. More than 10 million addresses have already been taken, making it almost impossible to get a simple online identity like SoccerFan.net or SmithFamily.org. The same is true for budding entrepreneurs hoping to launch easy-to-remember businesses like FreePizza.com.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The cost of securing an outpost in cyberspace is expected to fall as a result of an agreement the Clinton administration announced Tuesday that will transfer control of the Internet naming system from the U.S. government to the private sector. The agreement among the Commerce Department, Network Solutions Inc. and the Internet Corp.
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