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Internet Corp For Assigned Names And Numbers

BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than 10 days before the transition to a fully competitive system for registering Internet domain names, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers accused Network Solutions Inc. of trying to thwart the process to protect its business. Until this month, Herndon, Va.-based Network Solutions was the only company able to register domain names ending in .com, .org and .net.
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BUSINESS
October 25, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dozens of firms are eager to compete with Network Solutions Inc. in the lucrative business of registering Internet domain names, the cyberspace addresses that end in .com, .net and .org. But in an ironic twist, NSI's monopoly could be extended beyond its expected end date in early November because of protests from the company's competitors. Ten firms are critical of an agreement reached last month by Network Solutions, the Clinton administration and the Internet Corp.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | KIM GAMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The U.S.-based agency that oversees Internet names worldwide was criticized Sunday for not approving new addresses fast enough as demand grows among Web surfers from California to China. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, which was selected by the U.S. government in 1998 to regulate the system of domain names, took up the subject at its quarterly meeting in Stockholm as it faces growth in unsanctioned suffixes such as ".wine" and ".god."
BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The cost of securing an outpost in cyberspace is expected to fall as a result of an agreement the Clinton administration announced Tuesday that will transfer control of the Internet naming system from the U.S. government to the private sector. The agreement among the Commerce Department, Network Solutions Inc. and the Internet Corp.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Individual Internet users will be able to participate in the nonprofit organization charged with managing the Internet domain name system under a plan adopted Thursday. Anyone with an e-mail account and a postal address will be able to vote for the 18 members of an "at-large council" that will become one of the main supporting organizations of the Los Angeles-based Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, ICANN interim President Mike Roberts said.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN
While most Americans are focused on the looming national elections, there was another interesting election last week, one with some intriguing implications for the future. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, which is based in Marina del Rey, conducted the world's first global "cyber-election." Internet users around the world voted five new at-large members onto ICANN's board of directors, one for each major continent.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network Solutions Inc. boasts that it has registered 5 million Internet domain names ending with .com, .net and .org. With so many names already locked up, a growing segment of the Internet community is lobbying for the addition of new suffixes, such as .store, .web and even .sex. That idea was originally proposed in 1997, when Internet leaders from around the world began suggesting ways of ending Network Solutions' monopoly in the domain name registration business.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 3 1/2 years of political wrangling and administrative delay, the ubiquitous "dot-com" is expected to get some company this week at the annual meeting of the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group that oversees the Internet's addressing system. More than 19 million addresses ending in ".com" have already been snapped up, as have 5 million addresses with the ".net" and ".org" suffixes.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today was supposed to have been a milestone day in the evolution of the Internet as a fully self-governing international entity. Instead, the global information network is laboring under the worst power struggle among administrators in its history. After three years of work by computer scientists, private businesses and government negotiators, Network Solutions Inc. was supposed to relinquish its control of the system for registering Internet addresses, or "domain names," ending in .com, .
BUSINESS
November 1, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network Solutions Inc. is about to lose its six-year monopoly in the lucrative business of registering Internet domain names, the essential ".com" monikers that serve as identities in cyberspace. But to hear Chief Executive Jim Rutt tell it, the company couldn't be more excited. "We really do believe it's a good thing for the company," said Rutt, whose firm already has 87 competitors lined up. "It will stimulate new uses of domain names, and we'll get a certain amount of that business.
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