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Internet Corp For Assigned Names And Numbers

BUSINESS
August 27, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Individual Internet users will be able to participate in the nonprofit organization charged with managing the Internet domain name system under a plan adopted Thursday. Anyone with an e-mail account and a postal address will be able to vote for the 18 members of an "at-large council" that will become one of the main supporting organizations of the Los Angeles-based Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, ICANN interim President Mike Roberts said.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | GARY CHAPMAN
While most Americans are focused on the looming national elections, there was another interesting election last week, one with some intriguing implications for the future. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, which is based in Marina del Rey, conducted the world's first global "cyber-election." Internet users around the world voted five new at-large members onto ICANN's board of directors, one for each major continent.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network Solutions Inc. boasts that it has registered 5 million Internet domain names ending with .com, .net and .org. With so many names already locked up, a growing segment of the Internet community is lobbying for the addition of new suffixes, such as .store, .web and even .sex. That idea was originally proposed in 1997, when Internet leaders from around the world began suggesting ways of ending Network Solutions' monopoly in the domain name registration business.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 3 1/2 years of political wrangling and administrative delay, the ubiquitous "dot-com" is expected to get some company this week at the annual meeting of the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group that oversees the Internet's addressing system. More than 19 million addresses ending in ".com" have already been snapped up, as have 5 million addresses with the ".net" and ".org" suffixes.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2008 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
In addition to the likes of .com and .net, the Internet might soon have Web addresses ending in .fun, .cars and .prettymuchanythingyouwant. Heralding the most dramatic expansion of virtual real estate in 40 years, the international group controlling Internet addresses decided Thursday to let anyone apply to be in charge of new last names for the Web. The Internet Corp.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven new suffixes that promise to revolutionize the way the Internet is used joined the ubiquitous .com Thursday, marking a small but epochal shift in the evolution of the Internet from a computer network for researchers and corporations to a bustling agora of the masses. After more than three years of sifting through hundreds of possible new addresses, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers voted to accept .biz, .info, .name, .pro, .museum, .aero and .
BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today was supposed to have been a milestone day in the evolution of the Internet as a fully self-governing international entity. Instead, the global information network is laboring under the worst power struggle among administrators in its history. After three years of work by computer scientists, private businesses and government negotiators, Network Solutions Inc. was supposed to relinquish its control of the system for registering Internet addresses, or "domain names," ending in .com, .
BUSINESS
November 1, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network Solutions Inc. is about to lose its six-year monopoly in the lucrative business of registering Internet domain names, the essential ".com" monikers that serve as identities in cyberspace. But to hear Chief Executive Jim Rutt tell it, the company couldn't be more excited. "We really do believe it's a good thing for the company," said Rutt, whose firm already has 87 competitors lined up. "It will stimulate new uses of domain names, and we'll get a certain amount of that business.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Adult content won't get its own dot-xxx address on the World Wide Web because it would force the organization that manages Internet addresses to regulate content. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names & Numbers, or ICANN, rejected the dot-xxx designation by a 9-5 vote in response to government concerns about offensive content. The action marks the second time in less than a year that ICANN has rejected a proposal from ICM Registry of Jupiter, Fla.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, technology reporter
As of Monday, Network Solutions' monopoly days are numbered. For six years, the Herndon, Va., company has held an exclusive contract with the U.S. government to register domain names on the Internet. But with the increasing commercialization of the global computer network, the Clinton administration has encouraged the Internet community to devise a plan to bring competition to the market for registering names that end in .com, .net and .org.
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