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Internet Corp For Assigned Names And Numbers

BUSINESS
February 9, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, technology reporter
As of Monday, Network Solutions' monopoly days are numbered. For six years, the Herndon, Va., company has held an exclusive contract with the U.S. government to register domain names on the Internet. But with the increasing commercialization of the global computer network, the Clinton administration has encouraged the Internet community to devise a plan to bring competition to the market for registering names that end in .com, .net and .org.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 2005 | From Reuters
The United States will keep control of the domain-name system that guides Internet traffic under an international agreement, resolving a dispute that threatened to fracture the global computer network. Negotiators at the United Nations World Summit on the Information Society said they had agreed to set up a forum to discuss spam e-mail and other Internet issues and explore ways to narrow the technology gap between rich and poor countries.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
Meanwhile, two other groups of companies led by Idealab-backed DotTV applied for the suffixes .nom and .pro. Neither proposal fared well in reviews conducted by ICANN staff members and a group of outside advisors. The reviewers said the DotNom Consortium's application was technically weak, and that the business plan submitted by the DotPro Consortium wasn't specific enough. After striking a high-profile deal to register Internet addresses that end in .
BUSINESS
July 27, 2006 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
The federal government appeared unlikely to relinquish oversight of the system for assigning and managing website domain names after a Commerce Department hearing Wednesday raised broad concerns about giving an obscure Marina del Rey nonprofit unsupervised control. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers was created in 1998 to run the domain name system under the supervision of the Commerce Department. Domain names are the addresses ending in .com, .
BUSINESS
June 3, 2002 | Reuters
The group that oversees the Internet's traffic system moved closer to a complete overhaul over the weekend when a committee recommended changes aimed at making the organization function more smoothly. A committee set up by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers recommended that the group retool its internal structure and change how corporate directors are chosen, but rejected a proposal to bring governments on board.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1998
The nonprofit group that expects to largely assume control of managing the Internet from the federal government has selected Michael M. Roberts of Portola Valley as its interim president. His first effort will be to reassure U.S. officials that the California-based Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, will be open and financially accountable. Roberts retired recently as vice president of Educomm, a high-tech consortium of 600 colleges and universities.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2011 | By Alexander Macinnes
Small businesses trying to find new ways to market themselves online may soon tap new branding opportunities, if the organization that regulates Internet domain names expands its offering beyond the traditional .com suffix. The Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, a nonprofit group that controls the Internet's naming system — also known as the domain name system — will meet in Singapore this month to decide whether to allow companies or organizations to create unique domain suffixes.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2009 | Dan Fost
It sounds almost silly to say it, but the Internet is going global. Of course, it's already global. But the underlying technology that makes the Internet run was developed by the Department of Defense 40 years ago, and the federal government continued to have an outsized voice in how the Internet was run. Eleven years ago, as the Internet took off, the U.S. turned over some of its governance to an obscure nonprofit group, the Internet Corp....
BUSINESS
March 19, 2002 | Reuters
The group that oversees the Internet's domain-name system was slapped with a lawsuit by one of its directors, who says he has been denied access to the organization's corporate records. Karl Auerbach, a director of the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, filed suit to gain access to travel records, payroll figures and other day-to-day details of the organization that oversees the system that guides e-mail and Web browsers.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2002 | Reuters
The group that oversees the Internet's name system voted to exclude ordinary Web surfers from its board in a move critics say allows mainstream interests to tighten their grip on the online world. ICANN, or the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers, abolished online election of individual Internet users to the group's executive board. Instead, the 19-member board of directors will be drawn from representatives of technical, business, government and nonprofit organizations.
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