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Internet Freedom

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NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Jon Healey
The Daily Caller, a right-of-center news outlet, offered this scoop Friday: The proposed Republican Party platform includes a call for "Internet freedom. " That may seem like endorsing motherhood and apple pie, but the meaning is much more elusive. That's because the definition of "Internet freedom" depends on whose freedom you're trying to preserve. The provision in the proposed Republican platform suggests the main threats to freedom come from government regulators and outdated rules that stop innovative telecommunications companies from rolling out new services and extending broadband to more parts of the country.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001
U.S. high-tech companies are providing the Chinese government with technology to regulate the Internet (Jan. 27). As we condemn China for its pitiful human rights record, let us not forget that our freedom-loving people in the U.S. are providing China with the tools for suppression--all in the name of economic freedom and profit! CAROL IU Los Angeles
WORLD
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Washington would not look favorably if it turns out that China and Russia purposely chose to ignore American desires to apprehend National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on three felony counts, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said on a three-day visit to India. Terming Snowden an indicted felon, Kerry said all appropriate countries have been notified of his status. “It would be very disappointing if he was willfully allowed to board an airplane” from Hong Kong to Moscow, Kerry said at a news conference with Indian Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid, adding that he “would be deeply troubled” if Russia and China knew of Snowden's plans, “and there would be, without any question, some effect and impact on the relationship and consequences.” “I'd urge them to live within the law,” Kerry added.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Christopher J. Dodd, a former Democratic senator from Connecticut and now Hollywood's point person in Washington, had some rare kind words for Republicans. Dodd, chairman and chief executive of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying group, praised the GOP's statements on intellectual property and Internet freedom during its convention in Tampa, Fla. "The Republican Party platform language strikes a very smart balance: it emphasizes the importance of us doing more as a nation to protect our intellectual property from online theft while underscoring the critical importance of protecting Internet freedom," Dodd said in a statement.
WORLD
April 21, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
"There are 400,000 words in the English language, and there are seven of them that you can't say on television…. They must be really bad." In 1972, comedian George Carlin wrote a monologue titled, "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television." When a version of this riff was broadcast the following year on a jazz radio station, it set off a legal battle that went all the way to the Supreme Court, which ultimately upheld the right of the Federal Communications Commission to regulate indecent material on the airwaves.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. may have pulled its search engine out of mainland China, but it's still pressing U.S. and European governments to take a stand on censorship as an unfair barrier to free trade. The Internet giant's top lawyer, David Drummond, said Wednesday that pressure from Western nations is "the only way that it's going to change, that this tide of censorship or this rising censorship is going to be arrested," according to an Associated Press report. Google has been trying to make Internet freedom a plank of American foreign policy since its public standoff with Chinese leaders over censorship issues and cyber attacks that infiltrated Google and the Gmail accounts of human rights activists.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2006
Regarding "Phone firms' TV market bid may skip Congress," Nov. 28: "Net neutrality" is about whether we, the consumers, get to choose what we view and what speed of service we purchase, or whether AT&T Inc., Verizon Communications Inc., etc., get to decide this for us. Phone companies have to connect all phone calls. Period. If the business owner down the street pays a higher fee, he can get more services, but he can't purchase a clearer connection or the right to receive calls faster or at the expense of mine.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
What would the world be like without the Internet? Fire up your browser and see what you can't do. In the first strike of its kind, hundreds of popular sites such as Wikipedia, Reddit and Boing Boing were scheduled to temporarily shut down Wednesday to protest a pair of anti-piracy bills that they say essentially amount to censorship of the Internet. The prospect of a day without the websites set off a frenzy in the hours leading up to the strike, which was slated to begin Tuesday night, with parents urging their children to do their homework early and tech-savvy users posting instructions for how to access cached Wikipedia pages during the blackout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
I hate to say this. Well, maybe I don't. It appears that Edward Snowden, the 30-year-old computer analyst hiding in broad daylight, has managed not only to throw a wrench into U.S. foreign policy but also to outfox the very national security apparatus whose overreach he warned against. It's pretty astonishing that our government can figure out a way to vacuum up our every phone call, email and text message but can't get its hands on Snowden, who left Hong Kong for Russia on Sunday, and may be there still, as he figures out how to make his way to what he has (inexplicably)
OPINION
June 14, 2013 | By David Schenker
Jordan's King Abdullah II has a lot on his plate. Not only is the kingdom hosting nearly 500,000 Syrian refugees, the economy is deteriorating, there's serious unrest in the southern town of Maan, plus persistent protests related to a widespread perception of officially sanctioned corruption and burgeoning domestic opposition to the U.S. deployment of troops and F-16s to protect Jordan from violent spillover from Syria. The palace has pursued some savvy initiatives to insulate the nation from these challenges, including seeking U.S. loan guarantees to float a Eurobond, securing a $2-billion IMF loan and taking very public preliminary measures to fight corruption.
WORLD
June 14, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With Edward Snowden in Hong Kong dribbling out morsels on U.S. cyber surveillance activities to the press, Chinese authorities have several choices for dealing with him. Their options include offering asylum to the former U.S. contractor, who says he leaked National Security Agency secrets and is expected to face criminal charges; interrogating him; or urging him to leave. So far, officials in Beijing look to be playing it cool by doing nothing - and that, several experts said Friday, is perhaps the savviest thing they could do. With some U.S. lawmakers calling Snowden, 29, a traitor and raising questions about whether he has a relationship with a foreign government, any moves by Beijing to contact Snowden could inflame tension with Washington just days after a summit between President Obama and Chinese leader Xi Jinping.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - They came from all over Silicon Valley, hundreds packing the pews of an old church to pay their respects to Aaron Swartz, the 26-year-old programmer and Internet activist who took his own life this month. They didn't just come to mourn a fallen comrade, they said. They came to carry on his fight. The memorial service held last week at the Internet Archive, a nonprofit group that occupies a former church in San Francisco, was as much political rally as solemn tribute.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eric Schmidt, Google's ambassador in chief, is going where few Internet executives have gone: North Korea. Google's executive chairman will take part in a private trip led by former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, sources told The Associated Press on Wednesday. North Korea does not have diplomatic relations with the United States, and it has some of the tightest restrictions of any country on citizens' access to the Internet. But Richardson, an expert in negotiating with North Korea, has long sought to ease tensions on the Korean peninsula.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Christopher J. Dodd, a former Democratic senator from Connecticut and now Hollywood's point person in Washington, had some rare kind words for Republicans. Dodd, chairman and chief executive of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying group, praised the GOP's statements on intellectual property and Internet freedom during its convention in Tampa, Fla. "The Republican Party platform language strikes a very smart balance: it emphasizes the importance of us doing more as a nation to protect our intellectual property from online theft while underscoring the critical importance of protecting Internet freedom," Dodd said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
When Iranians rose up and marched against their rulers, people around the world felt they were there. Facebook bristled with video from the streets of Tehran. Revolutionary-green avatars sprouted across the Web. Commentators heralded a coming "Twitter Revolution. " The euphoria was pervasive - until a radical skeptic punctured the conventional wisdom. Evgeny Morozov, a virtually unknown writer and sometime technology advocate, launched his counteroffensive three years ago at the annual TED ideas conference.
WORLD
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Washington would not look favorably if it turns out that China and Russia purposely chose to ignore American desires to apprehend National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on three felony counts, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said on a three-day visit to India. Terming Snowden an indicted felon, Kerry said all appropriate countries have been notified of his status. “It would be very disappointing if he was willfully allowed to board an airplane” from Hong Kong to Moscow, Kerry said at a news conference with Indian Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid, adding that he “would be deeply troubled” if Russia and China knew of Snowden's plans, “and there would be, without any question, some effect and impact on the relationship and consequences.” “I'd urge them to live within the law,” Kerry added.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
President Obama nearly broke Reddit on Wednesday afternoon when he took to the popular website for a half-hour question-and-answer session. Obama answered only a handful of question during the "Ask Me Anything" session, but his presence caused Reddit to significantly surpass its record for most users on at one time. Reddit, which started to gain mainstream notice this year, got more than 200,000 visits at one point, breaking its previous high of 130,000. And that number may be lower than it actually was because of issues the site began to experience during the session with Obama.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Jon Healey
The Daily Caller, a right-of-center news outlet, offered this scoop Friday: The proposed Republican Party platform includes a call for "Internet freedom. " That may seem like endorsing motherhood and apple pie, but the meaning is much more elusive. That's because the definition of "Internet freedom" depends on whose freedom you're trying to preserve. The provision in the proposed Republican platform suggests the main threats to freedom come from government regulators and outdated rules that stop innovative telecommunications companies from rolling out new services and extending broadband to more parts of the country.
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