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BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
With 125 million viewers watching more than 1 billion of its videos a month, Machinima may be the most-watched channel that's not on TV. The specialty channel devoted to video-game aficionados — which offers game walk-throughs, gaming news, exclusive trailers and original series — is the channel with the fourth most subscribers on YouTube, itself the world's third most popular website, according to online measurement firm ComScore Inc. ...
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
With 125 million viewers watching more than 1 billion of its videos a month, Machinima may be the most-watched channel that's not on TV. The specialty channel devoted to video-game aficionados — which offers game walk-throughs, gaming news, exclusive trailers and original series — is the channel with the fourth most subscribers on YouTube, itself the world's third most popular website, according to online measurement firm ComScore Inc. ...
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BUSINESS
September 15, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
The question nagged Harvey Levin all summer: Is the Internet a place where TV careers go to die -- or be reborn? After Telepictures Productions pulled the plug on Levin's syndicated newsmagazine "Celebrity Justice," he was approached about starting an entertainment news website with America Online. "My initial reaction was, I couldn't be less interested," Levin recalled. "I thought, I'm going to do more television. Why would I do Internet?"
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Mark Milian
Among all the buzzwords describing the "light speed" and "real-time" nature of technology these days, few events are driving home the point better than the Tiger Woods affair, a veritable hole in one for the Internet's quick turnaround time. Take for instance the online game that rolled out just four days after his auto accident. Break Media's Tiger Hunting has players guide a cartoon Tiger Woods in his Cadillac Escalade, with a supposed mistress seated beside him, down a street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Twenty years ago, CBS producer Susan Zirinsky helped inspire the character of Jane Craig, the hard-charging television producer played by Holly Hunter in "Broadcast News" who fiercely resists the devolution of news into show business. Now Zirinsky herself is on the frontier of melding journalism and entertainment in an online project for one of CBS' prime-time shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
Can you believe GodTube.com? First, the upstart Christian video site became the nation's fastest-growing Web property for August, according to ComScore's Media Metrix. Its 1.7 million unique visitors represented a 973% increase in traffic over the previous month. In September, the number of visitors leveled off, but the length of the average user's stay nearly doubled to a healthy 7.7 minutes, ComScore said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
THE bald and bespectacled Paul "Renetto" Robinett, doing his best full-throated impersonation of Eddie Vedder, strums his way through "Amazing Grace" on a beautiful, custom-made guitar. An instrument-maker in Nashville sent it to him. "Don't let anybody tell you that there aren't perks for vlogging on YouTube," Robinett said, "because this guitar was mailed to me for free."
BUSINESS
February 7, 2007 | From Reuters
Warner Music Group has signed a deal to allow its entire catalog to be played over the fast-growing social networking music service Last.fm. The deal with Warner is the first with one of the major labels, and the network's co-founder, Martin Stiksel, said it was in talks with the other three major labels and content holders. With more than 15 million active users per month, Last.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2007 | From Times Staff Writers
There may be one constant in the media sector in 2007: its obsession with Google Inc. and the Web. Internet envy had old media working overtime in 2006. Viacom Inc. Chairman Sumner Redstone became so overwrought after losing the MySpace social networking site to News Corp. that he served up his well-regarded lieutenant of 20 years, Tom Freston, as a scapegoat. Freston was sacked.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
CBS Corp., which already sells episodes of its hit television shows "Survivor" and "CSI" on Google Inc.'s online video store, is now offering the downloads on Apple Computer Inc.'s iTunes Music Store. Apple's online store carries other shows from ABC, NBC and Fox. It previously offered some CBS programming, such as NCAA basketball, but not prime-time hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | Beth Hartnett
Dead rats and voodoo threats replace a newcomer's gift basket at a Brooklyn apartment complex. A little old lady, dressed like Strawberry Shortcake, finds solace with her dolls and cats. Sinister scents and a nervous neighbor make one man wonder what might really be happening on the other side of his shared wall. These are all snippets of private lives, witnessed through open curtains or over backyard fences. They are also the riveting real-life material documented in an online comic-book project called "Next-Door Neighbor."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If there is one thing that every studio, network and cable channel has in common these days, it's that they are all frantically obsessed with finding the Next Hot New Thing -- i.e. a compelling pop culture concept or phenomenon that will spawn a new hit franchise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2009 | Greg Braxton
As a stuntwoman, Zoe Bell knows about being photographed from awkward or distant angles that obscure her face. But with the Crackle.com online series "Angel of Death," she had to get used to her close-up. Playing Eve, the ruthless assassin at the center of the series, required the New Zealand native to display both action and acting chops -- and at times, she found it easier to brawl than bawl. "I had to get over that fear of showing emotion," said Bell. "Doing the butt-kicking stuff was no problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2009 | SCOTT COLLINS
Journalists like to talk about "owning" a story. But the people at RadarOnline.com have practically stamped their corporate logo on the forehead of Nadya Suleman, the "Octo-Mom" from Whittier whose shockingly prolific reproductive habits have made her a media sensation. They really, really love to talk about Octo-Mom over at RadarOnline. In fact, since the news of her octuplets first broke in late January, the website has published 56 items about her, an average rate of nearly two per day.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Hollywood talent agencies pride themselves on placing their star clients into the biggest movies and TV shows. Now, add YouTube to the list. William Morris Agency, one of the largest talent firms, is in talks for a deal that would funnel its clients -- both actors and consumer brands -- into videos created for the Internet giant.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Verrier is a Times staff writer.
Striking writer Peter Hyoguchi was walking the picket line outside Disney's ABC Studios in Burbank in January when he had an epiphany. What if scriptwriters launched a website featuring their work, which they would own and control free of studio interference? That hunch is about to be tested. After months of planning and delay, Hyoguchi and his colleagues have turned their seemingly quixotic idea into a reality.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
AOL plans today to relaunch its Netscape Internet portal as an experiment in community journalism, trying to recapture the magic of the once-famous online brand. Netscape will rely on its users to submit, rank and comment on news stories, videos and blog postings from across the Web. Stories will be organized into 30 categories, such as movies, travel and money.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Video-sharing site YouTube Inc. deleted nearly 30,000 files after a Japanese entertainment group complained of copyright infringement. The Japan Society for Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers found 29,549 video clips such as television shows, music videos and movies posted on YouTube's site without permission, said Fumiyuki Asakura, an official with the organization. San Mateo, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2008 | David Sarno and Mario Russo, Times Staff Writers
Over the last half-decade, enterprising Web auteurs have created -- and we're ballparking, but this feels right -- hundreds of original Internet TV series. There are production companies that churn them out, websites that warehouse them, and vast armies of amateurs who own a camera and aren't afraid to use it. But from that crowded landscape of Web TV shows, who among us can name more than, we don't know, two? Even the standouts -- "Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog," "Pink," "You Suck at Photoshop" -- fade quick: When an entire season of a Web show adds up to fewer minutes than one episode of "True Blood," the chance to make a lasting impression is fleeting indeed.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Hoping to plant their flags on the screens of Internet-connected television sets, Intel Corp. and Yahoo Inc. unveiled a new project Wednesday to populate those screens with tiny programs called widgets. Depending on your point of view, the goal is to create a multitasker's dream or an information-overload nightmare: It would let people do things like check their stock prices or peruse their photos, all while watching TV. The notion that the Internet will be the delivery mechanism for TV has been gaining momentum, and the Intel-Yahoo partnership, called the "Widget Channel," reflects the potential.
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