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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000
Scholastic Inc. has launched a half-hour Internet-radio program aimed at providing information of interest to schoolteachers. "Teacher Radio," which premiered Monday, is available Monday through Thursday (with the audio feed available any time that day) via http://www.scholastic.com.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1996 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Online calculators Ever wonder how much mortgage you can afford or how much you'd need to save to send the kids to an Ivy League college? Most people don't know how to figure the answers themselves, so many pay professional financial planners hundreds of dollars to do the math for them. But thanks to the wonders of computers and the Internet, there's help for those who want to do it alone. The American Bankers Assn.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002 | Jane Engle
Marriott International Inc. has expanded a program that provides high-speed Internet access and unlimited local and long-distance phone calls within the U.S. to its guests for $9.95 per day. The "Wired for Business" plan, offered last year at eight hotels across the country (including the San Diego Marina Marriott, Oakland City Center Marriott and Anaheim Marriott), is now at 30 Marriott-operated and franchised hotels in Washington, D.C.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A year after the much-hyped launch of its Internet access service had consumers clamoring for software, AT&T Corp. said it will end its introductory offer of free Internet access to long-distance customers. The telecommunications giant said that after March 31, a revised pricing plan for its WorldNet Service will go into effect but that it will continue to offer its flat-rate pricing plan of $19.95 a month for unlimited access.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When CBS started charging fans of "Big Brother 2" for extra video feeds over the Internet, it generated a storm of protests--and a surprising number of paying customers. CBS' experience this summer has helped pique the TV industry's interest in using the Net not just to promote shows, but also to sell them. Several networks plan to experiment with Internet-based services, charging for access to exclusive or customized news, sports and specialty programming.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning in April, one of the few things you still can't do on the Internet--register your car--will finally be available to some California motorists. In a joint announcement with IBM, the California Department of Motor Vehicles said 30% of the state's registered vehicles--about 7.5 million cars, trucks, motorcycles, trailers and vessels--will initially be eligible for online registration. Eligibility will depend on whether an owners' insurer provides online proof of insurance.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Responding to the allure of online shopping, General Motors Corp. said Monday it is launching a program allowing customers to complete all but the final steps of a vehicle purchase on the Internet. Expanding the features of its GM BuyPower Web site, GM will let customers check available vehicle inventories in their area and get a guaranteed "e-price" based on sales in their market. A dealer would handle the final paperwork.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fresh assault on bridging the gap between the haves and have-nots of the Internet revolution, Houston launched an innovative program Monday providing each of its 1.8 million residents with free e-mail accounts and access to word processing software. The multimillion-dollar effort is the first attempt by a major U.S. city to create a public utility for computing.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1999 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, WASHINGTON POST
The Internal Revenue Service has proposed a one-year pilot program in California to use electronic mail to speed the delivery of personal tax information to mortgage companies, credit bureaus and lenders. The test, which will be limited to a handful of lenders in the state, is raising alarms among privacy advocates who say that the system would make sensitive tax information so easy to transmit that more businesses could demand it.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The relentless growth of telephone taxes has finally hit a political flash point, triggering demands by lawmakers this week that phone companies be blocked from imposing billions of dollars in new fees on customers this summer. After a deluge of complaints from consumers across the nation, members of Congress are demanding the Federal Communications Commission--which regulates the phone industry--roll back an Internet wiring program that was championed by Vice President Al Gore.
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