Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInternet Radio
IN THE NEWS

Internet Radio

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
The jockeying has begun on Capitol Hill over congressional legislation known as the Internet Radio Fairness Act, or IRFA (HR 6480 and S3609), with many musicians, record companies and performing rights organizations lining up in opposition to the bills that are supported by Internet radio operators and other big tech companies such as Google. Wednesday's first day of hearings included testimony from producer-songwriter Jimmy Jam, SoundExchange president Michael Huppe, Hubbard Radio President and CEO Bruce Reese, Venrock investment partner (and former eMusic chief)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Internet radio's drumbeat is getting louder.  More than half of Americans who go online listen to Internet radio services, and consumers who use them are using them more often, indicating the industry has become increasingly mainstream, according to a new study by Edison Research. For the study, streaming services Pandora Media Inc., Spotify and TuneIn turned to Edison, based in Somerville, N.J., to survey more than 3,000 people age 12 and up about their online music consumption.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Alex Pham
House lawmakers on Friday introduced a bill aimed at lowering the fees paid by Pandora Media and other Internet radio streaming services. The bill proposes to change the way the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board calculates how much money Internet radio services must pay music labels and artists. Pandora has actively lobbied Congress to make the change, arguing that the current method is unfair because it charges Internet radio services disproportionately more than similar services provided by cable operators and satellite radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Pandora's legal disputes with performance-rights organizations are heating up. BMI, or Broadcast Music Inc., one of the groups that collects royalties from broadcasters to pay publishers and songwriters, is suing the Internet radio giant in response to its attempt to lower its rates by buying a traditional FM radio station. Pandora revealed Tuesday it is acquiring a terrestrial station in Rapid City, S.D., to make a point about the rates it pays. PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 Pandora has said it is unfairly forced to pay higher rates than traditional radio operators such as Clear Channel, which owns 850 physical stations and the Web streaming music service iHeartRadio . Last year, Pandora, which has 200 million registered users and 70 million active users, sued the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)
BUSINESS
May 1, 2002 | Jon Healey
Fans of Internet radio may find their station taking an extended break today to protest a proposed royalty for musicians and record labels that could drive many Webcasters off the Net. Organizers of the "Day of Silence" say hundreds of online stations will replace some or all of their programming with public-service announcements, discussions of the new fees or silence.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | Andrew Asch, Special to The Times
One of Los Angeles' most vibrant subcultures started with the simplest of urges: Mark "Frosty" McNeill wanted to play records. From that seed grew Dublab, an Internet radio station that survived the dot-com crash and stamped its influence all over L.A.'s underground arts scene. If you've never heard the eclectic fare webcast at www.dublab.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
The music won't stop for Internet radio after a group of webcasters struck an agreement with SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, over payments for playing music online. The settlement ends a 2 1/2 -year-old dispute that had threatened to silence the nascent Internet radio business and had forced some people who started online stations as a hobby to quit for fear of accruing expensive royalty bills. The deal is part of a series of agreements made this year that cover various sectors of the industry, including small webcasters and conventional radio stations that simulcast their broadcasts online, and have resolved much of the controversy.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2011 | By Alex Pham and Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Shares of Pandora Media Inc. rocketed nearly 63% in the initial hours of the stock's debut on the New York Stock Exchange, but subsequently fell back to Earth as concerns set in over the company's ability to reverse its string of losses and eventually turn a profit. The stock, which was priced at $16 on Tuesday night, traded as high as $26 early Wednesday but lost much of its gain throughout the day, closing at $17.42 for a modest 8.9% first-day gain. "Investors had their initial emotional flush with the stock," said David Menlow, head of IPOfinancial.com in Millburn, N.J. "Then they got a strong dose of reality.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Pandora Media Inc., an Internet streaming radio service used by more than 80 million listeners, is planning to launch an initial public offering this year. After years of struggling for survival, the Oakland, Calif., company is on the verge of breaking even and sees the offering as an opportunity to raise $100 million in order to grow its business. In its prospectus filed Friday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Pandora reported a $16.8-million loss on $55.2 million in revenue for its fiscal year ended Jan. 31, 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. More than 100 pop, rock, R&B, country and hip-hop musicians are protesting Pandora radio's efforts to persuade Congress to reduce the fees the Internet radio service pays for playing their music, arguing that the measure would “gut the royalties that thousands of musicians rely upon.” Katy Perry , Britney Spears, the Dead Kennedys, Jackson Browne, Don Henley, Cee Lo Green, the...
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Chris O'Brien
Back in September, there were reports that Apple was in talks with major record labels to launch an Internet radio service that would rival Pandora. That news caused Pandora shareholders to, well, freak out.  Then, in October, speculation heated up that Apple was close, and might even launch its radio  service in November. Yet, here it is December, and still no official word from Apple HQ. However, analyst Richard Greenfield of securities firm BTIG thinks Apple handed us a whopper of a clue about its intentions when it released iTunes 11 last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
The jockeying has begun on Capitol Hill over congressional legislation known as the Internet Radio Fairness Act, or IRFA (HR 6480 and S3609), with many musicians, record companies and performing rights organizations lining up in opposition to the bills that are supported by Internet radio operators and other big tech companies such as Google. Wednesday's first day of hearings included testimony from producer-songwriter Jimmy Jam, SoundExchange president Michael Huppe, Hubbard Radio President and CEO Bruce Reese, Venrock investment partner (and former eMusic chief)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. More than 100 pop, rock, R&B, country and hip-hop musicians are protesting Pandora radio's efforts to persuade Congress to reduce the fees the Internet radio service pays for playing their music, arguing that the measure would “gut the royalties that thousands of musicians rely upon.” Katy Perry , Britney Spears, the Dead Kennedys, Jackson Browne, Don Henley, Cee Lo Green, the...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Alex Pham
House lawmakers on Friday introduced a bill aimed at lowering the fees paid by Pandora Media and other Internet radio streaming services. The bill proposes to change the way the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board calculates how much money Internet radio services must pay music labels and artists. Pandora has actively lobbied Congress to make the change, arguing that the current method is unfair because it charges Internet radio services disproportionately more than similar services provided by cable operators and satellite radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Alex Pham
This post was not written by a Nigerian prince. SoundExchange, a nonprofit group that collects digital music royalties on behalf of artists, on Wednesday said that around 50,000 musicians have unclaimed money with the group totaling more than $31 million. The amounts range from $10 to $100,000 per artist or label, the group said.  Those who want to see if a check is waiting for them should visit SoundExchange and check the database . Among the names listed are Mark Wahlberg's hip-hop band Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, The Smith Westerns and Joaquin Phoenix.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before making sure to catch the next Venus transit in 2117. The Skinny: Why do the midseason comedies always look better than what has been scheduled for the fall? Shouldn't it be the other way around? Wednesday's headlines include a look at who won the California tax credit lottery, a new deal from Clear Channel that could change the relationship between radio and performers and an "oops" moment for ABC's Barbara Walters. Daily Dose: Jim Paratore, the veteran television executive who played a key role in the development of Ellen DeGeneres' talk show as well as the creation of TMZ, died last week of a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Alex Pham
This post was not written by a Nigerian prince. SoundExchange, a nonprofit group that collects digital music royalties on behalf of artists, on Wednesday said that around 50,000 musicians have unclaimed money with the group totaling more than $31 million. The amounts range from $10 to $100,000 per artist or label, the group said.  Those who want to see if a check is waiting for them should visit SoundExchange and check the database . Among the names listed are Mark Wahlberg's hip-hop band Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, The Smith Westerns and Joaquin Phoenix.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998
I read with great interest the Pop Eye article about Internet radio (Jan. 11), in which KNAC's Long Paul states that "as far as I know, we are the first to do anything of this nature." Paul's memory is extremely short. We carried his "Instrumentals of Rock" program at Hard-Radio, the Internet's No. 1 radio station. The show was canceled by the program's syndicator. HardRadio (http://www.hardradio.com) specializes in the hard rock/heavy metal genre and our online station was one of the pioneers of Internet radio over two years ago. I'm sure that the L.A.-based broadcast trade journals know us. We were the first "cyberstation" ever featured in Radio & Records (April 1996)
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
Investors slammed Pandora Media Inc., sending shares down as much as 21% in after-hours trading, when the Internet radio company reported a wider-than-expected loss for its fiscal fourth quarter and projected that revenue would decline in the current quarter. The stock had closed at $14.27 a share, down 39 cents, in regular trading. After the Oakland Internet radio company reported its results, its shares fell to as low as $11.22 after hours. Pandora's losses widened to $8.2 million for the quarter that ended Jan. 31 from a loss of $1.4 million a year earlier when it was a private company.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2011 | By Alex Pham and Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Shares of Pandora Media Inc. rocketed nearly 63% in the initial hours of the stock's debut on the New York Stock Exchange, but subsequently fell back to Earth as concerns set in over the company's ability to reverse its string of losses and eventually turn a profit. The stock, which was priced at $16 on Tuesday night, traded as high as $26 early Wednesday but lost much of its gain throughout the day, closing at $17.42 for a modest 8.9% first-day gain. "Investors had their initial emotional flush with the stock," said David Menlow, head of IPOfinancial.com in Millburn, N.J. "Then they got a strong dose of reality.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|