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BUSINESS
January 14, 2010 | By David Pierson and Barbara Demick
Bouquets were laid in front of Google Inc.'s headquarters in China on Wednesday, a show of support for a company whose threat to exit the country rather than be party to more censorship is a dramatic shot across the bow of the Chinese Communist Party. But while Chinese cyberspace was awash with chatter about Google's gambit, state-controlled media downplayed the story, reporting that Google had been a victim of cyber attacks in China but making no mention of the company's allegations that human rights activists' e-mail accounts had been hacked.
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BUSINESS
July 10, 2009 | Alex Pham
Google Inc. made waves in the tech world this week when it announced plans to release an operating system called Google Chrome OS that would encourage wider use of something called cloud computing. Although most have never heard of cloud computing, many do it every day.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
Time Warner Cable Inc. announced Thursday that it would shelve plans to begin charging Internet customers as much as $150 a month for heavy usage. However, the company said it could resurrect the notion of "consumption-based billing" after "further consultation with our customers and other interested parties." "For right now, it's off the table," said Alex Dudley, a Time Warner spokesman.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Chmielewski is a Times staff writer.
In an attempt to make headway against rampant film piracy, Warner Bros. will distribute newly released films online in China. The studio struck a deal with Union Voole Technology in China to offer new movies, as well as those that have never been seen in Chinese theaters, at rental prices ranging from 60 cents to $1. The inexpensive video-on-demand service seeks to entice China's estimated 253 million Internet users to pay for Hollywood fare rather than download illicit copies.
OPINION
January 14, 2008
To many Hollywood executives, "user-generated content" means short videos of cats playing the piano. In other words, it's not the kind of competition that threatens people who make $100-million movies. But a spate of new studies provides a more detailed picture of consumers' efforts to create content for themselves and their friends, and the results spell trouble for Tinseltown. Consider the research recently published by Deloitte, a consulting firm, on what it calls "the media democracy."
BUSINESS
December 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
More Americans are Googling themselves -- and many are checking out their friends, co-workers and romantic interests too. In a report Sunday, the Pew Internet and American Life Project said 47% of U.S. adult Internet users surveyed last year had looked for information about themselves through Google or another search engine. That is more than twice the 22% of users who did in 2002, but Pew senior research specialist Mary Madden was surprised the growth wasn't higher.
OPINION
December 1, 2007
Re "Technology's soul," Opinion, Nov. 25 The Times editorializes about Internet companies' work on a code of conduct to include "a demand that governments follow formal legal procedures to obtain information about Internet users." The Times also says that the "efforts could relieve the competitive pressures that often lead companies to become complicit in political crackdowns."
BUSINESS
November 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Media mogul Barry Diller said Friday that his Internet conglomerate, IAC/InterActiveCorp, would invest $100 million to expand in China by creating services designed for local users. Diller also said IAC would launch its Ask.com search engine in China within two years. IAC is looking for opportunities to develop or buy businesses geared to Chinese users, added Diller, IAC's chairman and chief executive. New York-based IAC's 30 Web brands include dating site Match.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
Google Inc. is used to being the center of attention, the giant that executives at other Internet companies wish Silicon Valley would shut up about already. For the moment, they've got their wish. People here can't stop talking about Facebook Inc. Commanding their attention: the social networking site's rocketing growth, cheeky business strategies and staggering valuation. Microsoft Corp. last month took a small stake in Facebook that valued the company at $15 billion.
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