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Internment Camps

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | Catherine Saillant
Advocates working on ways to commemorate the World War II detention of Japanese immigrants in La Tuna Canyon learned this week that a developer is taking legal action to reverse the city's historic-landmark designation of a one-acre plot at the former camp. "We were stunned," said Lloyd Hitt, a retired Sunland pharmacist and major driver of the city's historic designation in late June. "Everything had been going so well. It was a sad moment. " From 1941 to 1943, the camp held more than 2,000 "enemy aliens," primarily Japanese, detained there before being sent to internment camps in other locations in California and the West.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
As thoroughbreds were groomed and prepped for the day's races, a group of elderly Japanese Americans circled the stables of Santa Anita in a tram. For six months in 1942, they lived here, in the same stalls where horses had slept, before being shipped to internment camps in isolated areas of the country. Back then, arriving adults mourned the loss of homes and businesses, while children explored the grounds, making new friends. In the barns, a thin layer of asphalt was all that separated families from layers of manure.
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WORLD
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. House passed a nonbinding resolution urging Japan to apologize for coercing thousands of women into working as sex slaves for its World War II military. Officials in Tokyo say their country's leaders have apologized repeatedly, but the resolution's supporters say Japan has never fully assumed responsibility. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe caused anger in March when he said there was no evidence that the women had been coerced. Lawmakers want an apology similar to the one the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
MANZANAR, Calif. - Over the objections of critics, Los Angeles is moving ahead with plans to build a $680-million 200-megawatt solar energy plant within view of this desolate Eastern Sierra site that was a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Southern Owens Valley Solar Project would erect 1 million photovoltaic panels on 1,200 acres it owns roughly 6 miles south of Independence and...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John Cox first visited the internment camp where about 10,000 Japanese-Americans were forcibly relocated during World War II, he was shocked--not by what he saw, but by what he didn't see. "There was nothing," the 16-year-old Northridge Boy Scout said of his trip last year. "There was just these two guard shacks and a few walls still standing. There's really nothing but a memorial plaque to tell you what really happened here."
TRAVEL
April 14, 2013
I feel compelled to respond to Bill Watters' letter of April 7 regarding Japanese internment during World War II. First, he seemed to have missed his history lessons as many of these internees were U.S. citizens. Second, if their "spartan" camps provided "medical and social" needs, it is because the internees had to build them from scratch. Third, upon their return they were not compensated. Most lost their homes (forced to sell before being forced to leave), their businesses, property and farms.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton announced a plan Thursday to preserve sites of camps where the U.S. government interned 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Americans, he said, must "never forget this sad chapter in our history." "We are diminished when any American is targeted unfairly because of his or her heritage," Clinton said in a letter read at the dedication of a memorial in Washington to those interned and to the 33,000 Japanese Americans who fought for the United States in the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | JULIE TAMAKI
To this day when Phil Shigekuni passes by a garage sale he is overcome by a sense of sadness. Innocent as they may seem, such sales trigger memories for Shigekuni of a period in his childhood when his parents and many of their friends held lawn sales at which they sold nearly everything they owned because they were about to be shipped off to internment camps.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2005
REGARDING "A French Village's Unexpected Heroes" [Her World, Sept. 4], Susan Spano wanders off track as a travel writer to a political critic when she refers to President Franklin Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066 as "infamous." The attack on Pearl Harbor was infamous. It is so easy to be an armchair historian by hindsight. Roosevelt passed this law mandating internment camps after being counseled by many members of Congress and his Cabinet. There was a definite clear and present danger due to mass hysteria of American citizens on our entire West Coast.
NEWS
February 19, 1995
The treatment of Japanese and Japanese American women in World War II internment camps will be the emphasis of a lecture titled "America's Concentration Camps" to be given Tuesday evening. The presentation will made by Diane Fujino, a professor of Asian women's studies at UC Santa Barbara. Using photographs and posters, Fujino will provide a historical overview of the internment of 110,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans imprisoned by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
The tiny congregation in Los Feliz looked long and hard for a new pastor - someone joyful and brave, committed and kind, welcoming to all and unwilling to talk down to any. Pretty much from its founding in 1905, Mount Hollywood Congregational Church has charted its own course: integrating early, protesting injustice often, trying hard to change the world for the better. Its 50 or so active members, while diverse in age, ethnicity and background, are very much in sync in their spiritual style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | Catherine Saillant
Advocates working on ways to commemorate the World War II detention of Japanese immigrants in La Tuna Canyon learned this week that a developer is taking legal action to reverse the city's historic-landmark designation of a one-acre plot at the former camp. "We were stunned," said Lloyd Hitt, a retired Sunland pharmacist and major driver of the city's historic designation in late June. "Everything had been going so well. It was a sad moment. " From 1941 to 1943, the camp held more than 2,000 "enemy aliens," primarily Japanese, detained there before being sent to internment camps in other locations in California and the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | Suzanne Muchnic
Japanese American artist Ruth Asawa was interned during World War II, first at the Santa Anita racetrack in Arcadia, where she lived in a horse stall that reeked of manure, and then at a relocation center in Arkansas, where 8,000 detainees were surrounded by barbed wire fences and watch towers. It was a defining experience, but not a devastating one. Decades later, when Asawa had achieved fame in the art world and admiration in San Francisco as an educator and arts advocate, she told an interviewer that she felt no hostility about the painful period in her youth and blamed no one for her hardship.
WORLD
June 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
KOLKATA, India - India-born Monica Liu was 9 in 1962 when her family was loaded into box cars for an eight-day rail trip to an internment camp in the western Indian desert. The Lius were among about 3,000 people of Chinese descent, most of them Indian citizens, rounded up without trial as suspected spies or sympathizers and placed in Rajasthan state's Deoli camp after India's one-month border war with China. Her family remained in detention until 1967. Over the decades, the Chinese-Indian community has paid a high price for India's humiliating defeat and the subsequent distrust between the two Asian giants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | Steve Padilla
Like many World War II veterans, he speaks modestly about his service. He is quiet and a polite listener, not the kind to draw attention to himself. But a few months ago, as he visited the National WWII Museum in New Orleans, other veterans noticed his hat emblazoned with his unit's insignia and number. "You see him?" someone asked. "He was in the 442. I've read about them. " Another vet, after spying the hat, walked up to him. "Sir, I just want to shake your hand. " The 442 refers to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, one of the all-Japanese American units that served with distinction in World War II. The unassuming man turning heads was my father-in-law, Tokuji Yoshihashi.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2013
I feel compelled to respond to Bill Watters' letter of April 7 regarding Japanese internment during World War II. First, he seemed to have missed his history lessons as many of these internees were U.S. citizens. Second, if their "spartan" camps provided "medical and social" needs, it is because the internees had to build them from scratch. Third, upon their return they were not compensated. Most lost their homes (forced to sell before being forced to leave), their businesses, property and farms.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
Rep. Howard Coble, attempting to clarify remarks he made last week, said Monday that the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II was wrong and should not be repeated. "I regret that many Japanese and Arab Americans found my choice of words offensive because that was certainly not my intent," said Coble, a Republican from North Carolina. A colleague, Rep. Michael M. Honda (D-San Jose), said that Coble "still missed the point."
TRAVEL
March 31, 2013 | By Diana Lambdin Meyer
CODY, Wyo. - The drive east of Cody is through high desert, and the February weekend of my visit was bitterly cold. But I was wearing a heavy down coat, snow pants and boots, and riding in a cozy, warm SUV. That's not how nearly 14,000 earlier visitors had arrived in Cody. They came by train from California in late August, and they weren't wearing down or fleece, nor did they have a comfy hotel room awaiting them. They were among the 100,000 Japanese Americans relocated from the West Coast to the interior of the U.S. at the beginning of World War II, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Frank Tanabe's health is deteriorating fast, but his desire to vote is not. The 93-year-old Japanese American lies on his deathbed in his daughter's Honolulu home, in hospice care since early September after doctors discovered his liver cancer had spread to his bones. He doesn't eat much, barely drinks water and no longer talks, his daughter, Barbara Tanabe, told the Los Angeles Times. But just because he can't speak doesn't mean Tanabe's voice won't be heard. In what will probably be his last dutiful act for his country, Tanabe voted absentee last week with his family's help.
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