Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInternment Camps
IN THE NEWS

Internment Camps

NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's just a piece of paper, a graying Ruth Matsuda started off humbly. But the high school diploma the 71-year-old Garden Grove woman will receive Thursday from Anaheim High School, 52 years late, helps heal a wound, she said. She and former classmate Toru Sugita, 72, would have graduated from Anaheim High in the mid-1940s. But halfway through their high school education, war broke out in the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For months American bombers had droned overhead, dropping only bombs. But in February, 1945, U.S. aircraft dropped paratroopers, and the prisoners in Japanese internment camps knew the occupation was over. After three years of imprisonment, the Britons, Dutch and Americans in Shanghai and elsewhere were free from the Japanese bayonet, barbed wire and beatings. In their jubilation, thousands of civilian prisoners of war left in a hurry. Most lost track of each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Manzanar, Calif., May 1942. It's a warm morning at the dusty, inhospitable World War II internment camp on the bleak edge of the Owens Valley. Latino teenager Ralph Lazo arrives by bus to join his Japanese American friends from Belmont High School. Lazo, a 16-year-old Mexican-Irish American, was motivated by loyalty and outrage at the internment of his friends. He became the only known non-spouse, non-Japanese who voluntarily relocated to Manzanar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-hundred-year-old Teru Noda leaned back in her wheelchair Friday morning and let loose a rush of laughter that had been 48 years in the making. Above her head, Noda gingerly waved a check from the United States government--a partial payment for the three years she spent in a desert internment camp during World War II. On the blue slip of paper, printed next to an inset of the Statue of Liberty, were the words, "Pay to the Order of: Teru Noda--$20,000."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the bus ride to the site of the former desert internment camp where he spent three years of his childhood, Takatow Matsuno furled and unfurled a copy of a 46-year-old photograph. It was a portrait of 77 Japanese-American children, among them Matsuno and his siblings, who spent most of World War II in an orphanage behind barbed wire at the Manzanar War Relocation Center in the eastern Mojave Desert. "The FBI took my father away and my mother was in the hospital," Matsuno explained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
As thoroughbreds were groomed and prepped for the day's races, a group of elderly Japanese Americans circled the stables of Santa Anita in a tram. For six months in 1942, they lived here, in the same stalls where horses had slept, before being shipped to internment camps in isolated areas of the country. Back then, arriving adults mourned the loss of homes and businesses, while children explored the grounds, making new friends. In the barns, a thin layer of asphalt was all that separated families from layers of manure.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Army took 3-year-old Annie Shiraishi Sakamoto away in the summer of 1942. Before the soldiers came, Annie lived at a Catholic orphanage in Los Angeles, the unwanted baby of a single mother and a married gardener. Maryknoll nuns took care of the girl--first brought to them as a 2-pound premature infant, sick with double pneumonia--until she was forced to leave the only home she knew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
On the night of Feb. 21, 1942, the FBI surrounded the Torrance home of Nikuma Tanouye. "They didn't even bother to knock, just kicked the door down," Tanouye's granddaughter, Diane Tanouye, said in an interview. He was arrested and imprisoned along with four other Japanese nationals. From days after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor until the end of 1943, the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|