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Internment

OPINION
May 14, 2005
Re "Nationalism's Psychotic Side," Commentary, May 10: Once again the intellectually (and journalistically) lazy Robert Scheer fails to do basic research. Scheer writes, "The patriotism of relatively few German or Italian Americans was questioned" during World War II. Over 10,000 Germans and Italians who resided in the U.S. when Nazi Germany and Italy declared war were placed in internment camps similar to those used for Japanese Americans on the West Coast. Also contrary to conventional wisdom, during World War II, there were hundreds of espionage and sabotage conspiracies by U.S. residents of Japanese and German extraction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1987 | GARRETT HONGO, Garrett Hongo is a poet and the author of "Yellow Light" and "The River of Heaven." He lives in Volcano, Hawaii. and
The relocation and internment of more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II--most of them American citizens--is only a partly acknowledged wrong. Although President Gerald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
Both Roy C. Brown's and John S. Williams' letters are laced with sprinkles of bigotry. This type of irrational thought is the root of what started the internment of American citizens of Japanese heritage during World War II. They both seemed to miss the point about why the internment of Americans of Japanese descent was unjust and simply ignore the fact that these are American citizens, not "Japanese." Somehow, they have rationalized that the Americans of Japanese descent had some control over the attack on Pearl Harbor or how the prisoners were treated in the Battle of Bataan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Hisaye Yamamoto, one of the first Asian American writers to earn literary distinction after World War II with highly polished short stories that illuminated a world circumscribed by culture and brutal strokes of history, has died. She was 89. Yamamoto had been in poor health since a stroke last year and died in her sleep Jan. 30 at her home in northeast Los Angeles, said her daughter, Kibo Knight. Often compared to such short-story masters as Katherine Mansfield, Flannery O'Connor and Grace Paley, Yamamoto concentrated her imagination on the issei and nisei, the first- and second-generation Japanese Americans who were targets of the public hysteria unleashed after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The farmland faces a skinny stretch of Hunt Road, fields that barely resemble the sagebrush-ridden piece of desert where Charles Coiner learned to drive as a teenager in southern Idaho. Coiner grew up about 15 miles from the site where Japanese Americans were detained behind five miles of barbed wire during World War II. They lived in tar paper-covered barracks at the Minidoka Relocation Center compound. "Even driving by here as a kid, nobody talked about it," he said. Coiner revisited the site in May with a group of Centennial High School students on a field trip, the culmination of several weeks the students spent studying World War II internment camps such as Minidoka.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
When Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan set out to make vampires frightening again with their novel "The Strain," the writing partners had their work cut out for them. The scariest thing about the sexy, brooding bad boys that seemed to be everywhere in pop culture was just how much of their initial bite they'd lost. Under the right circumstances, you could even take one home to meet Mom. Del Toro and Hogan had a noble aim, and they certainly put their hearts into the endeavor. In "The Strain," the calculating monster known only as the Master embarks on the first phase of his plan to subjugate humanity, stowing away on a plane bound for JFK and infecting the passengers with a virus that turns them into mindless, hairless, crimson-eyed minions who feast on blood through fleshy stingers in their throats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When Mike Maiorana was a boy during World War II, his family was like a lot of others in his Monterey neighborhood. In 1942, his mother was declared an "enemy alien," along with 600,000 other Italians and half a million Germans and Japanese who weren't U.S. citizens. More than once, men in suits searched the Maiorana house for guns, flashlights, cameras, shortwave radios — anything that could be used to signal the enemy. Like 10,000 others up and down the California coast, the family was suddenly forced to uproot.
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