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Internment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday to rescind a 70-year-old resolution calling for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said the supervisors voted on the issue Tuesday; the vote was Wednesday. In January 1942, the then-county supervisors unanimously urged President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proceed with the internment of Japanese Americans. "Because Japanese aliens are a potential source of danger to our security, it would be advisable for the Federal government to transfer them from Pacific Coast areas," their resolution read.
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OPINION
May 14, 2005
Re "Nationalism's Psychotic Side," Commentary, May 10: Once again the intellectually (and journalistically) lazy Robert Scheer fails to do basic research. Scheer writes, "The patriotism of relatively few German or Italian Americans was questioned" during World War II. Over 10,000 Germans and Italians who resided in the U.S. when Nazi Germany and Italy declared war were placed in internment camps similar to those used for Japanese Americans on the West Coast. Also contrary to conventional wisdom, during World War II, there were hundreds of espionage and sabotage conspiracies by U.S. residents of Japanese and German extraction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1987 | GARRETT HONGO, Garrett Hongo is a poet and the author of "Yellow Light" and "The River of Heaven." He lives in Volcano, Hawaii. and
The relocation and internment of more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II--most of them American citizens--is only a partly acknowledged wrong. Although President Gerald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
Both Roy C. Brown's and John S. Williams' letters are laced with sprinkles of bigotry. This type of irrational thought is the root of what started the internment of American citizens of Japanese heritage during World War II. They both seemed to miss the point about why the internment of Americans of Japanese descent was unjust and simply ignore the fact that these are American citizens, not "Japanese." Somehow, they have rationalized that the Americans of Japanese descent had some control over the attack on Pearl Harbor or how the prisoners were treated in the Battle of Bataan.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The farmland faces a skinny stretch of Hunt Road, fields that barely resemble the sagebrush-ridden piece of desert where Charles Coiner learned to drive as a teenager in southern Idaho. Coiner grew up about 15 miles from the site where Japanese Americans were detained behind five miles of barbed wire during World War II. They lived in tar paper-covered barracks at the Minidoka Relocation Center compound. "Even driving by here as a kid, nobody talked about it," he said. Coiner revisited the site in May with a group of Centennial High School students on a field trip, the culmination of several weeks the students spent studying World War II internment camps such as Minidoka.
OPINION
May 30, 2009
Re "Justice with empathy," Opinion, May 24 Missing from the list of personal influences that may have led to Chief Justice Earl Warren's "liberal" (or, more accurately, "liberating") judicial temperament was, perhaps, the most important pillar of any institution's sound and mature judgment: the ability to learn from one's mistakes. As California's attorney general in early 1942, Warren strongly supported the illegal internment of the state's Japanese Americans, a racially motivated, morally bankrupt, fear-mongering assault on the American concept of justice if ever there was one. Later, his regret for his part in supporting such an abuse of power arguably had a huge influence on his judicial character and his precedent-setting leadership in the protection of civil liberties as chief justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Togo W. Tanaka, a former journalist and businessman whose reports on life inside the Manzanar internment camp illuminated divisions in the Japanese American community after the attack on Pearl Harbor and the tensions that eventually erupted in riots at the World War II-era detention center, has died. He was 93. Tanaka died of natural causes May 21 at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, according to his daughter, Christine.
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