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Internment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday to rescind a 70-year-old resolution calling for the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said the supervisors voted on the issue Tuesday; the vote was Wednesday. In January 1942, the then-county supervisors unanimously urged President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proceed with the internment of Japanese Americans. "Because Japanese aliens are a potential source of danger to our security, it would be advisable for the Federal government to transfer them from Pacific Coast areas," their resolution read.
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OPINION
May 14, 2005
Re "Nationalism's Psychotic Side," Commentary, May 10: Once again the intellectually (and journalistically) lazy Robert Scheer fails to do basic research. Scheer writes, "The patriotism of relatively few German or Italian Americans was questioned" during World War II. Over 10,000 Germans and Italians who resided in the U.S. when Nazi Germany and Italy declared war were placed in internment camps similar to those used for Japanese Americans on the West Coast. Also contrary to conventional wisdom, during World War II, there were hundreds of espionage and sabotage conspiracies by U.S. residents of Japanese and German extraction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1987 | GARRETT HONGO, Garrett Hongo is a poet and the author of "Yellow Light" and "The River of Heaven." He lives in Volcano, Hawaii. and
The relocation and internment of more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry during World War II--most of them American citizens--is only a partly acknowledged wrong. Although President Gerald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When Mike Maiorana was a boy during World War II, his family was like a lot of others in his Monterey neighborhood. In 1942, his mother was declared an "enemy alien," along with 600,000 other Italians and half a million Germans and Japanese who weren't U.S. citizens. More than once, men in suits searched the Maiorana house for guns, flashlights, cameras, shortwave radios — anything that could be used to signal the enemy. Like 10,000 others up and down the California coast, the family was suddenly forced to uproot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2009 | Alison Bell
A plaque near the entrance on the sprawling grounds of the Santa Anita racetrack is the sole reminder of the track's place in World War II history as the nation's largest assembly center for Japanese Americans on their way to internment camps. Although the prestigious Breeders' Cup World Championships unfolded Friday and Saturday at the landmark racetrack, 67 years ago a darker chapter unfolded at the site. The horses were moved out, the track was shut down and the park's extensive grounds provided the massive space needed by the War Department to temporarily house thousands of people of Japanese decent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992
Both Roy C. Brown's and John S. Williams' letters are laced with sprinkles of bigotry. This type of irrational thought is the root of what started the internment of American citizens of Japanese heritage during World War II. They both seemed to miss the point about why the internment of Americans of Japanese descent was unjust and simply ignore the fact that these are American citizens, not "Japanese." Somehow, they have rationalized that the Americans of Japanese descent had some control over the attack on Pearl Harbor or how the prisoners were treated in the Battle of Bataan.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | Jessie L. Bonner, Associated Press
The farmland faces a skinny stretch of Hunt Road, fields that barely resemble the sagebrush-ridden piece of desert where Charles Coiner learned to drive as a teenager in southern Idaho. Coiner grew up about 15 miles from the site where Japanese Americans were detained behind five miles of barbed wire during World War II. They lived in tar paper-covered barracks at the Minidoka Relocation Center compound. "Even driving by here as a kid, nobody talked about it," he said. Coiner revisited the site in May with a group of Centennial High School students on a field trip, the culmination of several weeks the students spent studying World War II internment camps such as Minidoka.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | EUN-KYUNG KIM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During World War II, Alice Nishimoto and her family were forced from their home in Peru and herded into an American internment camp with thousands of other Japanese. After the war, no one wanted them. In Japan, they were considered American traitors. In the United States, they were illegal immigrants. Peru turned them away. Half a century later, they feel that the U.S. government owes them--and about 300 other Japanese from Latin America--an apology and $20,000.
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