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During World War II, Alice Nishimoto and her family were forced from their home in Peru and herded into an American internment camp with thousands of other Japanese. After the war, no one wanted them. In Japan, they were considered American traitors. In the United States, they were illegal immigrants. Peru turned them away. Half a century later, they feel that the U.S. government owes them--and about 300 other Japanese from Latin America--an apology and $20,000.
February 21, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
July 5, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Togo W. Tanaka, a former journalist and businessman whose reports on life inside the Manzanar internment camp illuminated divisions in the Japanese American community after the attack on Pearl Harbor and the tensions that eventually erupted in riots at the World War II-era detention center, has died. He was 93. Tanaka died of natural causes May 21 at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, according to his daughter, Christine.
September 27, 1987
Shumway complains that the "newly refined thinking to prior actions vis-a-vis the Japanese-American internment and compensation to internees could rekindle prejudices." The internment of Japanese-Americans cannot and should not be compared to "arrestees, pre-Miranda or schoolchildren (separate but equal) before Brown vs. Board of Education. As a patriot and citizen had Shumway been denied his rights under the Constitution and been ousted from his home and placed in an internment camp to be housed in a horse stall, would he have volunteered his services into the U.S. Armed Forces while his parents and family were still incarcerated behind barbed wire fences?
March 6, 1999
I am shocked that Kevin Thomas chose to end his review of "Rabbit on the Moon" by implying that Japanese American internees should be grateful to the U.S. government for suspending their constitutional rights ("An In-Depth Look at War Internment," Feb. 26). Not only is his comment that "the [internment] camps may have saved some [Japanese Americans] from lynch mobs" unwarranted, it also reeks of the illogic used by apologists for American slavery and the Holocaust. If the majority of society harbors hatred and ill will against a small minority, the problem rests with society and not with the scapegoat.
November 22, 2009
Nao Takasugi War detainee turned mayor Nao Takasugi, 87, a former state Assemblyman and Oxnard mayor who was sent to a Japanese internment camp during World War II, died Thursday of complications from a stroke, said his son, Ronald Takasugi. Takasugi, a Republican, spent six years in the Legislature before he was termed out of office in 1998. He was elected to the Oxnard City Council in 1976 and was mayor from 1982 to 1992 before winning the Assembly seat. "I don't feel angry anymore," he told the Ventura County Star in 2002.
May 22, 2008 | Mike Boehm
A new installation at the Japanese American National Museum in L.A. will be dedicated May 31 as a permanent complement to the National Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism in Washington. The East Coast monument was erected in 2000 to honor Japanese Americans who fought for their country during World War II -- and to commemorate the forced internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans during the war. The L.A. memorial consists of a donor wall of glass, steel and concrete, by Fresno designer Sidney Mukai, recognizing those who helped finance the East Coast memorial.
March 1, 1987
Recently I returned with 64 others from "Jack Chapman's Sentimental Journey to the Philippines," notice of which appeared in your Briefs column several months ago. I was born there, brought up in Manila, married, had two children and spent 37 months in a Japanese internment camp. Jack, in connection with Bur-Cal Travel in Burbank, planned a wonderful tour. Laughter and tears accompanied us as we visited the University of Santo Tomas where we spent those 37 months; the beautiful military cemetery.
January 23, 1991
The reports of FBI "interviews" of Arab-Americans bode ill for all of us. Unfortunately, governmental activity concerned with the Arab-American community has not been limited to this intimidation tactic. For four years the Immigration and Naturalization Service has been trying to deport several Palestinian peace activists despite the government's acknowledgment that the immigrants have never committed any criminal act. Proceedings are expected to recommence after March 1. Still more chilling is the government's plan, uncovered in the deportation case, to engage in mass roundups, internment and deportations of Arab immigrants "based solely on nationality."
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