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NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein
The one-two punch of high-intensity exercise and healthful eating was helpful in getting overweight and obese people to slim down, a study finds. The study, presented this week at the National Obesity Summit in Montreal, Canada, focused on data on 62 overweight and obese men and women involved in a nine-month program at the Montreal Heart Institute . The participants engaged in two to three weekly one-hour supervised exercise sessions and...
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NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein
The one-two punch of high-intensity exercise and healthful eating was helpful in getting overweight and obese people to slim down, a study finds. The study, presented this week at the National Obesity Summit in Montreal, Canada, focused on data on 62 overweight and obese men and women involved in a nine-month program at the Montreal Heart Institute . The participants engaged in two to three weekly one-hour supervised exercise sessions and...
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HEALTH
July 16, 2001 | Stephanie Oakes
Question: I'm 41 years old and admittedly a weekend warrior. I usually work out on a treadmill for 30 to 45 minutes about three days a week. I want to get in shape to play on a lacrosse team starting this fall. How do I get my cardio up for these hourlong games? --HUSTON BYRNE Answer: Try some interval training. This type of exercise will push your aerobic fitness to a higher level--just what you'll need for running the lacrosse field.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Endurance training and high-intensity workouts--do both offer cardiovascular benefits? A study finds that each form of exercise has health benefits, with intense workouts perhaps edging out the competition. The study focused on a group of 47 adolescents (average age about 16) who were assigned to a moderate exercise group, a high-intensity exercise group or a control group for seven weeks. The moderate exercise group did 20 minutes of steady running three times a week, while the high-intensity group did four to six repeats of an all-out sprint with brief recovery periods three times a week.
HEALTH
March 14, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It gets cold where I live. But even when the forecast is for "hideous below zero" ? as some Canadians are fond of saying ? I'd still rather go outside than run on a treadmill. That should give you an idea of how much I dislike this particular piece of workout equipment. Nevertheless, in the past week I've found myself doing the hamster imitation because I find treadmills good for one thing: high-intensity interval training, or HIIT for short. In my last column, I busted the myth that HIIT burns a lot more calories than regular aerobic exercise done at a steady pace.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Turn your body into a high-powered fat-burning machine! If you see those words on a weight-loss website — especially if the site offers "secrets," "tricks," "simple rules" or other gimmicks that promise to make your fat melt away — you should be very skeptical. I'm not saying it wouldn't be nice if there were some kind of shortcut, but that's just not the way it works. I'll make it simple: When you exercise, you burn more calories than you do while sitting on the couch.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DAN LOGAN, Dan Logan is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
At some point most athletes want to hoist themselves another rung or two higher on the competitive ladder. For runners, cyclists and swimmers, elapsed time is the measure of success. In other sports, however, bursts of speed are needed for maximum performance, says Jeff Dilts, fitness manager at the Sports Club/Irvine and a competitive rower and swimmer. In full-court basketball, for example, a player might sprint up and down the floor 100 times during a game.
HEALTH
January 15, 2007 | Roy M. Wallack, Special to The Times
For years, Michelle Cuellar exercised five days a week. "But you wouldn't have known it by looking at me," says the 33-year-old mother of two. "I felt fit -- but I was still fat." No matter what Cuellar did -- run on the treadmill for 30 minutes at a time or attend the occasional spinning class or boot camp, her weight rose. By last summer, she carried 176 pounds on her 5-foot-6 frame. Then, last fall, for the first time in her life, Cuellar started shrinking.
HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Cross "too busy" off that list of excuses for not making it to the gym. If you can't fit a long workout into your day, you may be able to get the same benefits by working out harder for a shorter period of time. Sprint interval training, which combines repeated, short bursts of intense exercise with intervals of rest, has long been the domain of professional athletes, such as swimmers and track runners.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to cardio exercise, less appears to be more. That's the conclusion of researchers who discovered that extremely short bouts of high-intensity exercise produce the same improvements in muscle health as longer, more moderately paced workout sessions. In the two-week study, published in this month's issue of the Journal of Physiology, 16 college-age men, all recreational exercisers, were asked to exercise on stationary bicycles three times a week.
HEALTH
March 14, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It gets cold where I live. But even when the forecast is for "hideous below zero" ? as some Canadians are fond of saying ? I'd still rather go outside than run on a treadmill. That should give you an idea of how much I dislike this particular piece of workout equipment. Nevertheless, in the past week I've found myself doing the hamster imitation because I find treadmills good for one thing: high-intensity interval training, or HIIT for short. In my last column, I busted the myth that HIIT burns a lot more calories than regular aerobic exercise done at a steady pace.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Turn your body into a high-powered fat-burning machine! If you see those words on a weight-loss website — especially if the site offers "secrets," "tricks," "simple rules" or other gimmicks that promise to make your fat melt away — you should be very skeptical. I'm not saying it wouldn't be nice if there were some kind of shortcut, but that's just not the way it works. I'll make it simple: When you exercise, you burn more calories than you do while sitting on the couch.
HEALTH
September 29, 2008 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The words "interval training" can strike fear in the hearts of even the most athletic men and women. Alternating periods of high-intensity work with recovery may sound simple enough, but those intense bouts can leave the exerciser gasping for air. It's that intensity that ultimately reaps great benefits, including strengthening the heart and improving the cardiovascular system, which is why personal trainers tend to favor interval training.
HEALTH
January 15, 2007 | Roy M. Wallack, Special to The Times
For years, Michelle Cuellar exercised five days a week. "But you wouldn't have known it by looking at me," says the 33-year-old mother of two. "I felt fit -- but I was still fat." No matter what Cuellar did -- run on the treadmill for 30 minutes at a time or attend the occasional spinning class or boot camp, her weight rose. By last summer, she carried 176 pounds on her 5-foot-6 frame. Then, last fall, for the first time in her life, Cuellar started shrinking.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to cardio exercise, less appears to be more. That's the conclusion of researchers who discovered that extremely short bouts of high-intensity exercise produce the same improvements in muscle health as longer, more moderately paced workout sessions. In the two-week study, published in this month's issue of the Journal of Physiology, 16 college-age men, all recreational exercisers, were asked to exercise on stationary bicycles three times a week.
HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Cross "too busy" off that list of excuses for not making it to the gym. If you can't fit a long workout into your day, you may be able to get the same benefits by working out harder for a shorter period of time. Sprint interval training, which combines repeated, short bursts of intense exercise with intervals of rest, has long been the domain of professional athletes, such as swimmers and track runners.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Endurance training and high-intensity workouts--do both offer cardiovascular benefits? A study finds that each form of exercise has health benefits, with intense workouts perhaps edging out the competition. The study focused on a group of 47 adolescents (average age about 16) who were assigned to a moderate exercise group, a high-intensity exercise group or a control group for seven weeks. The moderate exercise group did 20 minutes of steady running three times a week, while the high-intensity group did four to six repeats of an all-out sprint with brief recovery periods three times a week.
HEALTH
September 29, 2008 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The words "interval training" can strike fear in the hearts of even the most athletic men and women. Alternating periods of high-intensity work with recovery may sound simple enough, but those intense bouts can leave the exerciser gasping for air. It's that intensity that ultimately reaps great benefits, including strengthening the heart and improving the cardiovascular system, which is why personal trainers tend to favor interval training.
HEALTH
March 3, 2003 | Roy M. Wallack
Last year, 40 million Americans used treadmills, and consumers bought more of them than all other home exercise machines combined. It's easy to see why: Although pricey (the pounding quickly destroys sub-$1,500 models), quality treads deliver unbeatable aerobic bang for the buck. With tougher engines and heart-rate control, these four will give you a run for your money. Sleek, futuristic design Woodway Path: One of the most durable, expensive and radical designs.
HEALTH
July 16, 2001 | Stephanie Oakes
Question: I'm 41 years old and admittedly a weekend warrior. I usually work out on a treadmill for 30 to 45 minutes about three days a week. I want to get in shape to play on a lacrosse team starting this fall. How do I get my cardio up for these hourlong games? --HUSTON BYRNE Answer: Try some interval training. This type of exercise will push your aerobic fitness to a higher level--just what you'll need for running the lacrosse field.
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