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NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The police found her at an abandoned cement plant at 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday. They were too late. There were a few different ledges at the plant from which 12-year-old Rebecca Ann Sedwick, of Lakeland, Fla., could have jumped. One ledge reached up about 19 feet; another, about 24 feet; a third offered a 60-foot plunge to the ground. In the end, the ledge she may have chosen does not matter, officials said: Rebecca had almost certainly jumped to her death, chased to that abandoned lot by a vicious, relentless cloud of cyberbullying that had followed her out of one school already and never let her go. “We can see from what we've investigated so far that Rebecca wasn't attacking back," Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd told reporters Thursday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -   With Russian troops beginning military exercises near Ukraine, Secretary of State John Kerry warned Wednesday that a Russian intervention in the Eastern European nation would rip Moscow's international standing “into shreds.” While insisting that the Obama administration is determined to avoid a U.S.-Russian conflict over Ukraine, Kerry said that a military move would cost Moscow “hugely in a world where they're trying to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2010
‘Art Against Empire: Graphic Responses to U.S. Interventions Since World War II' Where: Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, 6522 Hollywood Blvd. When: Through April 15. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Price: Free Contact: (323) 653-4662; http://www.politicalgraphics.org
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By Michael O'Hanlon
For decades, one golden rule has guided America's military involvement in Africa: Stay out. Generally speaking, the reason was a sense that the strategic stakes did not justify the risk. When we deviated from this rule, we often learned lessons the hard way that seemed to reinforce its validity, as in Somalia in 1993. And while presidents often profess a stronger interest in Africa than their actions would imply, they tend to say such things when not in the White House - witness Bill Clinton calling the nonintervention in Rwanda's 1994 genocide his greatest regret as president, or Sen. Barack Obama calling for more assertiveness in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC, and Sudan six to eight years ago. But, in fact, now is the time to reassess this long-standing American anathema to military involvement in Africa's terrible wars.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
While the lion's share of youth anti-smoking efforts has focused on cigarettes, a new report in the CDC journal Preventing Chronic Disease suggests more needs to be done to reduce the number of teens smoking flavored tobacco from hookahs. According to a recent survey cited in the report, 18.5% of 12th-grade students admitted to using a hookah in the previous year. And what's particularly concerning to the study authors, led by Daniel Morris of the Oregon Health Authority's public health division, is that many young people don't seem to recognize that hookah use carries serious health risks: Hookah smoke contains many of the same toxins as cigarettes and has been associated with a similar laundry list of diseases such as lung cancer and respiratory illness.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
For most of us living in the developed world, diarrhea is an uncomfortable nuisance -- not a life-threatening event. But each year for more than a million children under the age of 5, it is a killer. It's known that a few simple precautions and treatments can make a difference and save a child. What's been unknown, say researchers led by Christa Fischer Walker of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, is whether providing those interventions makes a difference on a large scale, cutting disease and death rates around the globe.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kids may be spending too much time in front of computers and television, but are interventions designed to curb that working? An analysis of several reports finds that some do, but improvements may be needed. A meta-analysis of 47 studies targeting intervention programs to curb screen time among children younger than 12 found that 29 showed programs were successful at getting kids away from the television, computer and video games. The interventions ran the gamut and included programs based in schools, at home, in communities and in clinics and WIC centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1993
A letter writer (Jan. 18) asks if other countries can provide national health care why can't we? The reason is obvious. Other countries aren't Ramboing all over the face of the Earth in an attempt to impose their will on others. Vietnam, Korea, Grenada, Panama, the Middle East, Somalia, and then there's our inane feud with Cuba for over 30 years. Citizens want national health care, but also support foreign interventions. However, no new taxes! Make up your minds, we can't afford it all. BETTY T. McGILL San Diego
HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | By Amber Dance
Disease prevention doesn't take place just in the clinic. The majority of preventive measures -- from brushing teeth to wearing seatbelts -- happen in the community and workplace. And here the cost-benefit balance sheet is very different, some studies say, when you consider the cost not only to healthcare providers but also to employers and government, which might invest in antismoking campaigns or publicly accessible exercise programs. "In many cases, if not most cases, prevention activities are more cost-effective than treatment," says Ron Z. Goetzel, a research professor at Emory University in Atlanta and vice president of the healthcare division at Thomson Reuters, an information company with headquarters in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
In the weeks before celebrity disc jockey and Los Angeles club owner Adam Goldstein, who was better known as DJ AM, died of an accidental overdose Aug. 28, he had been filming a documentary-style reality series for MTV in which he helped families and friends of drug addicts stage interventions for loved ones. MTV announced Monday that it will move ahead with plans to air the eight-part series, "Gone Too Far," beginning at 10 p.m. Monday. Goldstein, 36, hosted and created the series, in which he helped addicts, ages 20 to 25, battle their alcohol and drug demons.
OPINION
September 18, 2013 | Patt Morrison
To strike Syria or not - for Rep. Howard "Buck" McKeon (R-Santa Clarita), that wasn't exactly the question. In the Wall Street Journal, he said he couldn't even consider U.S. military intervention unless the military budget was liberated from the sequester. McKeon has represented his rock-ribbed GOP district, in north L.A. County and Ventura County, since 1993. His campaigns have benefited from the district's aerospace and defense industries. He chairs the Armed Services Committee. And the nascent diplomatic deal to "sequester" Bashar Assad's chemical weapons?
NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The police found her at an abandoned cement plant at 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday. They were too late. There were a few different ledges at the plant from which 12-year-old Rebecca Ann Sedwick, of Lakeland, Fla., could have jumped. One ledge reached up about 19 feet; another, about 24 feet; a third offered a 60-foot plunge to the ground. In the end, the ledge she may have chosen does not matter, officials said: Rebecca had almost certainly jumped to her death, chased to that abandoned lot by a vicious, relentless cloud of cyberbullying that had followed her out of one school already and never let her go. “We can see from what we've investigated so far that Rebecca wasn't attacking back," Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd told reporters Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
A protest in Hollywood against U.S. military intervention in Syria snarled traffic Sunday but remained peaceful, police said. Witnesses said more than 100 people gathered on Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, and video taken at the scene showed them chanting "Hands off Syria" and holding signs calling for peace. The protest came as Congress prepares to resume debate over whether to attack the Mideast nation amid allegations that Syrian President Bashar Assad had launched a chemical weapons attack that killed hundreds of people.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Kim Willsher
PARIS -- In France, lawmakers seized on President Obama's decision to seek congressional authorization for a military strike on Syria as an argument for holding their own vote on a potential armed intervention. French President Francois Hollande has said his country would join the U.S. in punishing Bashar Assad's regime for allegedly ordering a chemical attack that killed hundreds of people. But opposition parties in France warned Hollande not to make any “hasty decisions” and demanded a vote in the National Assembly, even though Hollande is obliged neither to call nor to heed such a vote.
WORLD
August 30, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - After months of steady battlefield gains, the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad is bracing for a daunting new threat: a possible U.S. missile barrage in response to his military's alleged involvement in suspected poison-gas attacks outside Damascus. The Syrian leader has dismissed the accusations as "completely politicized," while his aides called the Aug. 21 attack a rebel provocation meant to incriminate Assad and draw U.S. military action. But more than two years into a grinding civil war that has left more than 100,000 people dead, the Syrian government seems resigned to the likelihood that it will directly face U.S. military might, a specter long considered the one development that could turn the tide of battle.
WORLD
August 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Kim Willsher
LONDON -- The drumbeat for Western intervention in Syria, including possible military strikes, grew louder Monday in Europe, mostly at the urging of Britain and France. The two nations also led the European response to the war in Libya, but this time even Germany, which sat out that conflict, has thrown its support behind a forceful response. British Prime Minister David Cameron cut short a vacation to convene an emergency meeting of security advisers Tuesday or Wednesday and may summon Parliament from its summer recess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1991
Re "We Politicized the Court; We Can Redeem It," Column Right, Oct. 30: Roger Pilon says the problem of the politicized Supreme Court began with the Progressives (1900-1916). He should have gone back one more historical period and looked at the business and political ethics of the late 1800s. In that period, industrial and commercial wealth was used to buy control of much of American political (and judicial) life. We had a form of plutocracy. To defend democracy, there had to be Progressive governmental interventions.
HEALTH
November 9, 2009 | Valerie Ulene, Ulene is a board-certified specialist in preventive medicine practicing in Los Angeles. The M.D. appears once a month.
All three of my children were delivered in a hospital under an obstetrician's care. Fetal monitors tracked the babies' heart rates, and an EKG machine measured mine. When it came to discomfort, I opted out and embraced every pain-relieving intervention that was offered. For me, each of the experiences was blissful -- pain-free deliveries with beautiful, healthy outcomes: Kira, Jamie and Clay. This type of birthing experience isn't right for every woman. Some pregnant women believe very strongly in a more natural birth process, striving to minimize the use of technological interventions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein
Ending two months of speculation and conspiracy theories about the death of journalist Michael Hastings, the Los Angeles County coroner has determined that the reporter died instantly from "massive blunt force trauma" in the fiery June crash. The coroner's report, released Tuesday, painted a troubled portrait of the journalist, whose 2010 Rolling Stone profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal led to McChrystal's resignation. Traces of drugs were found in Hastings' system, and the crash apparently came hours before his family planned to stage an intervention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | Steve Lopez
L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca has no medical background, but he is the de facto administrator of what he calls "the nation's largest mental hospital. " "This is the system," he said, drawing a box on a piece of paper in his Monterey Park office last week. Judges, prosecutors and law enforcement officials each have a role in deciding what to do with someone who has a mental illness and is accused of a crime, Baca said. But they decide each case in isolation, missing a broader concern - thousands of sick people get locked up, with no coherent plan for helping them get better.
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