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Interviewing

NEWS
January 27, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Fire Department has abruptly canceled interviews for captain positions because department officials have failed to heed a City Council directive to overhaul the interview process in response to a critical audit that found racism and sexism pervaded the department's hiring and promotion practices. More than 90 firefighters had signed up for the interviews, which were scheduled to start Friday, but now will be postponed for at least two months.
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NEWS
March 8, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for accused murderer Michael R. Pacewitz tried Wednesday to stop the news media from publishing jailhouse interviews with him, but a judge refused to issue such an order, saying freedom of the press was at stake. Deputy Public Defender Kevin J. Phillips sought a temporary restraining order to bar The Times and the Orange County Register from publishing comments Pace-witz made to reporters in a joint, one-hour interview in the medical ward at Orange County Jail.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen Gilroy sat alone in the Presidential Forum room, videotaping the enigmatic figure on the television screen who was explaining how he decided to resign from the presidency of the United States. When former President Richard M. Nixon was finished, Gilroy clicked off his videocassette recorder and walked out, leaving behind hundreds of questions and answers about a man who had intrigued him for years. "I would like to spend the whole day in here," he said.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a tight job market, the question of what to wear on a job interview becomes especially crucial to men and women. Clothes can make or break an applicant's chances of landing a job. "You won't get the job based on your clothing, but you could lose it," David Schwartz, co-owner of David Rickey & Co. men's clothier in Costa Mesa. He has seen job applicants commit every kind of fashion gaffe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Acting on the advice of his lawyers, who feared that he could be set up for a confrontation, rather than having a conversation, Howard Rosenberg has made a cowardly decision not to speak to Tom Brokaw and Katie Couric of NBC News, should they request an interview. Instead, he has granted the following exclusive interview to himself. Question: What a Wednesday! As if the planet were in peril, NBC broke into its regular daytime programming to have Brokaw announce that O.J.
WORLD
May 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Hoping to keep terrorists out of the United States, the Bush administration is planning a sharp increase in the number of face-to-face interviews with visa applicants, officials said. At present, many foreigners, particularly from countries considered unlikely sources of terrorists, are not subjected to interviews by U.S. consular officers. A State Department official, asking not to be identified, said the number of interviews has increased since the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Celebrity has its privileges, and haughtiness apparently is one of them. As Kelly McGillis declared the other day, asserting one of her prerogatives: "I'm a movie star. I can say no." Which is why officials of the Grove Shakespeare Festival must be gnashing their teeth over their recent attempt to court the press with what amounted to Kelly McGillis Day in the lounge of the Gem Theatre.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to pressure, ABC News said Tuesday that it will remove an interview with California children from its John Stossel program Friday, "Tampering With Nature," after their parents complained that they were misled about the news special. The network said it had concluded that Stossel did nothing wrong, but in an unusual move will excise that interview out of sensitivity to the parents.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1995 | CAROL SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interviewing for a job is an exercise in salesmanship that many people dread. But being prepared for an interview is the best way to make a good impression on a prospective employer. It also gives you information to help decide whether you'd want the job. Here, according to career experts, are some of the latest trends and pitfalls you may encounter on the interview circuit. Today, many interviews will have two parts: the classic question-and-answer portion and a skills-testing portion.
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