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Intravenous Drug Users

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NEWS
October 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sperm banks in the state can no longer accept gay men and intravenous drug users as donors because of new state health regulations prompted by fears about AIDS, officials said Tuesday. For the first time, sperm banks must get a state license and must subject all donors to at least two AIDS tests before their sperm is used, said Mary Anne Gardineer, an associate director of the New York state Health Department.
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HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thirty years ago Sunday, a brief report in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report described cases of a rare form of pneumonia called Pneumocystis carinii in five young Los Angeles men, "all active homosexuals. " The cases were noteworthy because the men had previously been healthy, though their particular pneumonia had only been seen in people with severely depressed immune systems. Within a month, a second report had identified 54 young gay men with a rare cancer known as Kaposi's sarcoma, another disease that had been almost unknown in young men. And by the following summer, the mysterious disease underlying these reports had a name: acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Los Angeles County, home to one of the largest concentrations of intravenous drug users in the United States, is lagging behind comparable urban areas in efforts to slow the spread of AIDS within this increasingly critical group. While smaller communities with fewer addicts have aggressive programs to teach needle users about the risks of catching and spreading the AIDS virus, Los Angeles County has yet to make a concerted effort to reach that majority of users not enrolled in drug treatment.
WORLD
July 16, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Nelson Mandela made an impassioned plea to the 15th International AIDS Conference on Thursday for more funds to fight tuberculosis, the lung disease that is the leading cause of death among AIDS victims in Africa. "The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority. This is a blessing, but TB remains ignored," said the former South African president, who will turn 86 on Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1991 | W. CHRISTOPHER MATHEWS, W. Christopher Mathews is an associate professor of clinical medicine at UC San Diego and the director of the Owen Clinic. He is a member of the Regional Task Force on AIDS
The prevalence of the AIDS virus among intravenous drug users appears to be low in San Diego right now: 2% to 5% of the drug injectors, according to county figures. But, once the virus gets into a drug-abusing population, it can spread silently and swiftly in the absence of aggressive intervention efforts. Increases of more than 10% per year in the prevalence of HIV antibodies--a precursor to AIDS--have been reported among IV drug users in New York City, parts of Italy, Edinburgh and Bangkok.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after it was proposed, Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday approved a program intended to dampen the spread of AIDS by distributing bleach and condoms to intravenous drug users. Board observers said the action signals the most significant shift in county policy since Supervisor Gloria Molina took her oath of office on March 8, ending a decade of conservative domination of the board.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thirty years ago Sunday, a brief report in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report described cases of a rare form of pneumonia called Pneumocystis carinii in five young Los Angeles men, "all active homosexuals. " The cases were noteworthy because the men had previously been healthy, though their particular pneumonia had only been seen in people with severely depressed immune systems. Within a month, a second report had identified 54 young gay men with a rare cancer known as Kaposi's sarcoma, another disease that had been almost unknown in young men. And by the following summer, the mysterious disease underlying these reports had a name: acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS.
NEWS
April 17, 1988
AIDS cases reported among New York City's intravenous drug users outnumbered cases among homosexuals and bisexuals for the first time during the first three months of 1988, the city Health Department reported. "It has become clear that the gay community has made effective progress in reducing the spread of new infection, unlike the IV drug-using population, where the virus continues to spread virtually unabated," said Dr. Stephen C. Joseph, health commissioner.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
While new cases of AIDS increase steadily in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area, public health officials are bracing for an expected rapid spread of the virus into the ranks of intravenous drug users and then into the general population. In Alameda County, the number of diagnosed AIDS cases doubled from 130 in August, 1985, to 267 last week. In Contra Costa County, 91 cases have been diagnosed, up from 50 in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988
Los Angeles County added another $170,000 Tuesday to its new outreach program aimed at reducing the spread of AIDS among intravenous drug users and their families. The Board of Supervisors forwarded a state grant to the Los Angeles Centers for Alcohol and Drug Abuse, a private organization that serves East Los Angeles, the San Gabriel Valley and Southeast Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her first public forum since winning the April primary in the 32nd Congressional District race, former state Sen. Diane Watson denounced a recent campaign mailer by an opponent, which described her as someone who "wants to give free needles to heroin addicts" and showed a graphic photograph of an addict shooting up. "It was a very scurrilous attack piece," Watson said about the mailer sent by her Republican challenger, Noel Irwin Hentschel. "It came into people's homes. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000
A moral riddle: Would you take steps to stem a deadly epidemic if by doing so you seem to sanction another deadly epidemic--the use of illegal drugs? The Ventura County Board of Supervisors grappled with this question last week and arrived at the correct answer. In a 4-1 vote, the board approved a needle-exchange program that will allow drug addicts to turn in used hypodermic needles for new ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a new and controversial front in local government's battle against HIV/AIDS, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday declared a public health emergency in Los Angeles County, paving the way for a legal needle exchange program. "We get very few opportunities in our political lives to save lives," said Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a scenario eerily reminiscent of the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic, nearly five dozen intravenous drug users in Scotland, Ireland and England have become ill or died since April of a mysterious illness whose origins health officials have not yet identified. The baffling ailment is characterized by excessive swelling and redness at the injection site, low blood pressure and a high white blood cell count, often followed by heart failure.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | Associated Press
City officials issued a health alert Thursday after two intravenous drug users died after being infected by a so-called flesh-eating bacteria. A 33-year-old woman died June 6 and a 28-year-old woman died Thursday. Doctors have tied the infections to heroin the women, who were sharing needles, were injecting. The bacteria suspected in the deaths is Clostridium perfringens and produces toxins that degrade human tissue, according to a city health official.
NEWS
August 21, 1997 | KASPER ZEUTHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing that the ban on federal funds for needle exchange programs might be lifted, opponents on Wednesday warned Congress and the Clinton administration that a majority of the public is against reversing the current policy. Needle exchange programs are "a dopey idea," said Gary L. Bauer, president of the Family Research Council, a conservative interest organization, as he held up a handful of syringes.
NEWS
August 18, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Financier George Soros said he will donate $1 million to buy clean hypodermic needles for drug addicts nationwide who risk contracting AIDS. Soros challenged government leaders to "respect the scientific evidence" that needle exchange programs curb the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Critics say the programs encourage drug use. Soros told the New York Times in an interview that he does not support legalizing drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1995
In the Dec. 11 article taking The Times to task for its coverage of an AIDS-related event, the author said that the largest group of AIDS cases was now heterosexual teens ("Where's a Times Reviewer When You Need One?," Calendar). I checked on TimesLink to look at the most recent articles about official Centers for Disease Control statistics on AIDS, and those articles all said that adult homosexuals were the largest group, followed by intravenous drug users. If anyone wonders why more and more young people aren't heeding "safe sex" warnings, I offer the theory it's because they've been given incorrect information such as the statement contained in the Counterpunch article about an AIDS "epidemic" among teens--an epidemic that doesn't exist.
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