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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | JOHN POPE and KIMBERLY BROWER and DEBRA CANO and RUSS LOAR
More than 130 student science projects will be on display at the Tustin Unified School District's Invention Convention from 6 to 8 this evening. Projects will be judged on presentation, originality, research, usefulness, illustration and written description. Winners will receive U.S. savings bonds. The convention is sponsored by the Tustin Public Schools Foundation and Silicon Systems, a Tustin computer manufacturer that donated $1,800 for the event.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
A fifth-grade student at Helen Estock Elementary School won the grand prize in an invention fair for "Blinky Belt," a seat belt with a blinking light attached so it can be found easily in the dark. Stephanie Smith won $200 in savings bonds for her winning entry in the "Astounding Inventions of the Future" fair at Irvine Valley College.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Most likely you've never heard of Walter L. Shaw. But it's just as likely that his inventions have been a regular part of your life.  Here are a few things Shaw invented: Call forwarding. Conference calling. Touch-tone dialing. The answering machine. A burglar alarm that calls the police. The White House "red phone" that provided an emergency link between Washington and Moscow.  OK, so you haven't used the last one. But still, it's an impressive list of stuff conceived by a man awarded 39 patents who eventually died penniless and relatively unknown.  Opening Friday is "Genius on Hold," a documentary that tells the story of Shaw that might be remarkable even if you didn't know it was made by his son, Walter Shaw Jr., one of the world's most notorious jewel thieves.  PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 Hyberbole?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Angie Navarro never expected science class at Tracy High School to be fun. And she certainly never imagined that it would lead to national recognition for herself and two classmates. In their science class at the high school in Cerritos, Navarro, Lisa Corral and LaJoi Stephens, all 18, dreamed up a woman's shoe that can be converted from a high heel to a low-heeled pump.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1992 | Ted Johnson / Special to The Times
The thought of getting your bicycle caked with dirt and dead bugs was nothing when you were a kid. It was just part of life. Yet, with bikes heading into the four-figure price range and gadgets and gizmos popping up as accessories, adult owners are a bit more attentive to the gleam on their handlebars.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | Ted Johnson / Special to the Times
Commercial plumber David Fortney had a problem: He had a large collection of baseball caps, but they were so soiled and grungy that his wife wanted him to throw them out. Instead, he came up with a trick to make the caps look as good as new. Placing them over hat forms he made out of wire coat hangers, he washed them along with the usual glasses and plates in the dishwasher. The result is his new invention: Ball-Cap Buddy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, Times Staff Writer
At first, Mike Gillick wasn't trying to get rich; he was trying to quiet his son. "Every time we took a trip in the car, he was constantly asking me: 'Are we there yet?' " said Gillick of 8-year-old Josh. "As many times as I've tried to answer, it just dawned on me that none of my responses registered." So, to appease Josh, Gillick took a sun visor and drew tiny pictures on it of the landmarks the family would pass during a long trip to a relative's house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999 | K.C. COLE
It's a question as old as Plato: Do scientists discover laws of nature, or create them? Did Einstein discover relativity, or did he think it up? Do mathematicians invent theorems and proofs, or are these truths out there waiting to be discovered? Do chemists find new molecules, or forge them? Sometimes, the answer is obvious. Astronomers didn't create the stars, and physicists didn't invent gravity. Something out there shines; objects fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1999 | JAMES MEIER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you've got to go, you've got to go. That fact of life inspired 6-year-old Curt Waki to invent a gadget that is bringing him a bit of celebrity. The Tustin Memorial Elementary first-grader has been invited to appear on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" to talk about his "portable potty." Necessity inspired the invention. "We were going to a baseball game," Curt recalled, and there was no place to stop for a bathroom break. So he improvised and used a fast-food drink cup.
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