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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after an aerial embolism from a high-altitude glider flight ruined his boyhood dream of becoming a fighter pilot, Lance Cpl. Howard A. Foote Jr. of Los Alamitos flew into Marine Corps history and the end of his military career. Under cover of darkness five years ago, the 20-year-old aviation mechanic stole an A-4M Skyhawk from El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and put the aging fighter-bomber through a series of high-speed maneuvers over the black waters of the Pacific.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 2012 | By Shan Li
Calling all inventors: Wal-Mart Stores Inc. wants you to parade your stuff. The nation's largest retailer is holding a contest, called Get on the Shelf, for a chance to snag a spot on its stores and website for your product. Think of it as American Idol: Retail Edition “That's uncovering the next great singer, this is uncovering the next product,” said Chris Bolte, vice president of @WalmartLabs, the retailer's social media and e-commerce arm. “This is a way for us to really provide our consumers with a voice on the kind of products that Wal-Mart carries.” That's because the contest will be determined by the public, who will vote on videos created by contestants and posted onto http://GetOnTheShelf.com . Aspiring businesses and individuals have until Feb. 22 to upload a clip about their product onto the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you missed the very fine, fine-art documentary "Tim's Vermeer" during its brief stop last month, it is back in town for its official run. Director Teller (better known as the droller half of the ironic comedy/magic team Penn & Teller) follows inventor Tim Jenison's journey to understand how the 17th-century painter Johannes Vermeer tripped the light so fantastically. A tale of art and obsession unfolds as Jenison experiments with various optical techniques Vermeer might have used to achieve his luminous interplay of light and shadow.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
The U.S. leads the world by a wide margin in attracting inventors from other countries, a key advantage in an ever more knowledge-based global economy. More than half of the immigrant inventors who switched countries between 2006 and 2010 came to the U.S., according to a report Wednesday by wealth management giant U.S. Trust. Germany was a distant second at 7.1%. The U.S. attracted 117,244 immigrant inventors, or 57.1% of the total, according to the report. China and India lost the most.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990 | From the Associated Press
One thousand saxophonists from throughout Europe will gather here Sunday to pay tribute to the instrument's neglected inventor. The golden horn that Adolphe Sax created 150 years ago revolutionized 20th-Century music, but he never heard the long, lonely flights of Lester Young, Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. His life, however, played like a melancholy jazz solo. It was marred by nearly fatal accidents, the first at age 3 when he fell three floors.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inventors of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your naivete. Such could be the motto of Joseph Gray, a youthful consultant here who has launched a new computer service for independent inventors. His hope is that by communicating and sharing experiences electronically, the lone wolves tinkering away in their garages can help each other avoid being victims of rip-offs. "We need to make people aware that they can be taken advantage of," Gray said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1987
Orange County industrialist Arnold O. Beckman was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame on Sunday during a ceremony in Arlington, Va., for his invention two generations ago of a meter to measure acidity and alkalinity. The 86-year-old founder of Fullerton-based Beckman Instruments Inc. attended the invitation-only induction and accepted a plaque and medallion from John R. Kirk Jr., president of the National Inventors Hall of Fame.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1995 | JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Click was breathing heavily as she carted two white plastic bins the size of milk crates from her car into the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office here Wednesday afternoon. "It's normally nothing like this," said Click, who works for an Alexandria, Va., law firm that prepares applications for clients ranging from small inventors to big businesses. But as was apparent from the hundreds of patent applications in her two bins, this is not a normal week at the patent office.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighteen inventors were picked this week for induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Akron, Ohio, including Paul C. Lauterbur, for the MRI; Robert M. Metcalfe, for high-speed networking known as Ethernet; and the late Peter C. Goldmark, for the long-playing record. The 2007 class of inductees includes seven living and 11 deceased inventors, bringing the number of inventors honored to 331. The hall of fame was founded in 1973 by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
USC will be constructing a new building for bioscience research, thanks in part to a $50-million gift from Gary K. Michelson, a retired orthopedic surgeon and inventor of spinal implants and other medical devices, the university is announcing Monday. The new, 190,000-square-foot USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience will house up to 30 labs investigating a range of biomedical topics. With groundbreaking expected later this year and completion in three years, it will be located at the southwest quadrant of the main campus south of downtown Los Angeles.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Mikhail Kalashnikov denied throughout his long life that he bore any responsibility for the millions of deaths caused by his namesake invention, the 100 million-plus AK-47 assault rifles that have been the weapon of choice for guerrillas, terrorists and kidnappers as well as standing armies. But the soldier-turned-inventor who died last month at age 94 apparently was tormented by feelings of guilt at the end of his life and wrote to the head of the Russian Orthodox Church last April to confess his anguish, the Izvestia daily newspaper reported Monday.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
The U.S. leads the world by a wide margin in attracting inventors from other countries, a key advantage in an ever more knowledge-based global economy. More than half of the immigrant inventors who switched countries between 2006 and 2010 came to the U.S., according to a report Wednesday by wealth management giant U.S. Trust. Germany was a distant second at 7.1%. The U.S. attracted 117,244 immigrant inventors, or 57.1% of the total, according to the report. China and India lost the most.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2013
Dr. George J. Magovern Co-inventor of heart valve that saved lives Dr. George J. Magovern, 89, heart surgeon and co-inventor of an artificial valve that marked a key advance in open heart surgeries, died at home in Fox Chapel, Pa., a suburb of Pittsburgh, on Monday, according to his son, George Jr. He had been in failing health for some time, his son said, and died in his sleep. Open heart surgery was in its infancy in 1962, when Magovern first implanted a self-sealing heart valve in a patient, saving precious time during an operation.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
From his home in Kalispell, Mont., Jim Wegener was anxiously watching Thursday night's college football game between Tulsa and Bowling Green. Heart in his throat, he was anticipating the big hits -- but not because he revels in such violence. The registered nurse was monitoring his invention, which he hopes will cut down on the number of concussions and head injuries on the field of play. The 68-year-old Wegener has developed a safety latch for football helmets, preventing them from popping off during play.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2013 | By Tricia Bishop
BALTIMORE - Calling "campus violence a reality" to prepare for, a university in Maryland announced last week that it planned to spend $60,000 on the Clark Kent of teacher supplies: an innocuous-looking whiteboard that can stop bullets. The high-tech tablet - which hangs on a hook, measures 18 by 20 inches and comes in pink, blue and green - can be used as a personal shield for professors under attack, according to the company that makes it, and as a portable writing pad in quieter times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995 | KATE FOLMAR
Despite what science textbooks include or omit, there are inventors other than Albert Einstein and innovative cultures beyond America and Europe--as Van Nuys Middle School students can well attest. On Thursday, about 70 seventh-graders at the school will display their knowledge of diverse cultures and inventors to parents, peers and elementary students during the school's second Multicultural Invention and Discovery Fair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995
Never underestimate the power of slime. That message came through loud and clear Friday at a showcase of inventors and their inventions that concludes Sunday at the Sheraton Universal Hotel in Universal City. In a makeshift exhibit hall created in the hotel's concrete parking garage, Kerry DeLine of Science Adventures entertained rapt crowds of schoolchildren with a demonstration of molecule-chained polymers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
In the early 1900s, Alexander Graham Bell intensively researched ways to lift humans heavenward on kite-like flying machines. Now comes the decidedly earthbound postscript. The detailed archive that the telephone's inventor kept of his much later experiments in flight - more than 950 photographs and 217 pages of laboratory journals, many in Bell's own hand - was pulled back from the auction block at a hotel in Westlake Village on Wednesday, shortly before it was to go under the gavel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Chuck Foley, whose Twister party game brought shoeless strangers achingly close to one another and made even the most spirited rounds of Scrabble seem comparatively tame, has died. He was 82. The inventor, who held 97 patents, died July 1 in a care facility in St. Louis Park, Minn., family members said Wednesday. He had Alzheimer's disease. Foley came up with a wide variety of gizmos and games, including a hand-launched toy helicopter, soft-tipped darts, plastic toy handcuffs and "un-du," a liquid adhesive remover used by librarians, people who keep scrapbooks, and anyone who wants to lift an uncanceled stamp off a used envelope.
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