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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sam Allen Davidson came to Los Angeles to breathe life into his inventions. But his life ended in a small, stuffy Van Nuys storage room surrounded by scientific notes that he could not bear to leave. He apparently had been living there since March. "He had a high IQ and was able to comprehend math and science, but he didn't have the common sense to take care of himself," said his brother Karl Davidson, 55, of Olympia, Wash.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first nine years of his life, Brent Weir has been trapped by his own body. Deprived of sufficient oxygen at birth, which severely damaged the parts of his brain controlling his limbs and speech, Brent has spent most of his life in a wheelchair, his only communication with the outside world being smiles and screams and cries. But because of the electronic and computer wizardry of R.J. Cooper, an inventor and computer programmer who volunteers his time at R.H.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2006 | From Reuters
A company that offered to help U.S. inventors turn ideas into profitable products was ordered to repay consumers $26 million and stop using bogus claims to recruit customers, the Federal Trade Commission said. The FTC sued Davison & Associates Inc., accusing the firm of making false claims in ads to sign up inventors by boasting of relationships with manufacturers.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I, like just about everyone else in America, occasionally come up with an idea that I'd love to turn into a billion-dollar product. I've never done it, but some people with great ideas have, taking the time to develop their product, file for a patent and bring it to market. It's not an easy process. Aside from having a great idea, you have to go through a search process to make sure that no one else has come up with it before.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert Hyatt, the lone La Palma inventor who emerged from obscurity in August with an apparently far-reaching patent on the microprocessor, said Wednesday that Intel and Motorola had decided not to contest that patent claim. As a result, Hyatt could be entitled to millions of dollars in license payments.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
It was a bleak February night and struggling inventor Scott McGregor was losing faith. The rent was owing, investors were nowhere to be found and food was running low. So he gathered his family of nine together and asked the big question. Should he get a job, any job, to keep them off welfare? Or should he pursue his dream of hitting it big with a cellular phone innovation? "Keep going," they said.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | From Reuters
In a second victory for inventor Robert Kearns, a jury ruled Thursday that Chrysler Corp. should pay $11.3 million for infringing his patent for an intermittent windshield wiper. Kearns, 64, won the patent infringement case against Chrysler last December. A federal jury found then that Chrysler infringed on four patents for intermittent wiper systems designed by Kearns. However, in Thursday's decision, the jury ruled that Chrysler's infringement was not willful and ordered the No.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A man who said the MGM Grand Hotel fire in Las Vegas inspired him to invent a portable smoke alarm for travelers won a $3.32-million verdict Wednesday from two companies that promised to help develop the device, but then marketed their own detector. The verdict, returned after a five-week trial in Los Angeles federal court, protects Fred W. Stilwell's contractual rights to an invention that sold 4,000 units in its first two months on the market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
In the clean, orderly workshop where he has tinkered since World War II, Vic Chatten has invented a contraption that he thinks is going to make the Los Angeles Harbor Department very happy. It will not increase revenues, nor will it ease the workload or improve efficiency. But it will make the pigeons go away. He calls it "the bird barrier."
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doug Malewicki would be the first to admit that some of his inventions have literally never gotten off the ground. Malewicki has invented a jet-powered motorcycle, a mileage-record-setting car, a speed-record-setting bicycle, a popular game for kids and a car-chomping mechanical dinosaur that performs at monster-truck shows. Malewicki is a real-life version of the scientist named Szalinski, portrayed by actor Rick Moranis in the hit movie, "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids."
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