Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInventory
IN THE NEWS

Inventory

BUSINESS
November 23, 2011 | By Jeffry Bartash
The U.S. economy grew at a slower pace than originally estimated in the third quarter, mainly because companies reduced inventories and did not invest as much. The Commerce Department cut its calculation of gross domestic product to 2% growth in the July-to-September period from an initial reading of 2.5%. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch expected the government to trim its estimate to 2.3%. Still, the 2% growth rate was the fastest since the fourth quarter of 2010. Most economists predict that the U.S. economy will grow even faster in the final three months of this year — 2.5% based on the latest MarketWatch forecast.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 22, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
More people closed deals on home purchases in October than economists expected, driving down the number of homes available for sale to an eight-month supply. Existing-home sales rose 1.4% from the previous month and were 13.5% above the same month a year earlier. Each month, the National Assn. of Realtors reports the figures in the form of an annual sales pace adjusted for seasonal variations. Last month's pace was 4.97 million, the group reported. Regionally, sales were up 4.4% in the West over the previous month, up 2.1% in the South, up 2.8% in the Midwest and down 5.1% in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | By Alejandro LazoLos Angeles Times
Call it a sliver of a silver lining for America's beaten-down housing market: The inventory of troubled U.S. homes not yet listed for sale is diminishing. Homes in foreclosure or headed into foreclosure are being sold at a fast-enough clip to chip away at the so-called shadow inventory that hangs over the U.S. market, Santa Ana data provider CoreLogic reported Tuesday. Shadow inventory at the end of July was down to 1.6 million units, representing a five-month supply of homes. That means there are 1.6 million homes in the pipeline not listed for sale.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
After being buffeted by wild stock market gyrations, unsettling economic news and Hurricane Irene, automakers are looking for some relief this Labor Day weekend — and that could mean good deals for consumers. The industry believes sales will quicken in September, bolstered by growing inventories of cars that were in short supply for much of the summer, bigger discounts and an economy that looks less likely to fall back into recession. "Marketing and incentive focus has already shifted to September with the upcoming Labor Day weekend, so with improved inventory, the sales pace could show marked improvement," said Jeff Schuster, an analyst with J.D. Power and Associates.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The nation's busiest seaport, Los Angeles, is on pace to have a record year in exports. July exports were up 12.8%, to 165,135 containers from 146,369 in the same month a year ago. "This is a robust total for exports," said Port of Los Angeles spokesman Phillip Sanfield. In 2010, the port set a record for exports with more than 1.8 million containers; it is on pace to surpass that this year. But as usual, imports dominated the port in July, an indication of the nation's huge trade deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2011 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
When John E. Fenton took over Metrolink in April of last year, the government-run railroad had fallen off the tracks. Several million dollars in inventory was unaccounted for. Ridership was declining and staff morale had plummeted. After a head-on crash with a freight train in Chatsworth killed 25 people in 2008, the line had the worst safety record in the nation for a commuter railroad. Today — 16 months after Fenton arrived — Metrolink has changed by a number of critical measures.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2011 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
Kevin Reynolds is hoping for a long, hot summer. He's not chasing a tan. He's hoping to attract more customers to his beachside concession stand, Kevaccino's on the Beach, in Playa del Rey. "When it cools off to 60 and 65, it just kind of blows me out of the water," said Reynolds, who cooks and staffs the walk-up order window with the help of three employees. This will be the third summer Reynolds has run the concession, and it has been challenging. Although the business was in the black last year, he used most of the profit toward paying off start-up costs, including credit card bills.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Rising prices and a looming vehicle shortage make this summer one of the worst times in years to go car shopping. But if your vehicle is on its last leg or your lease is about to come due, here are some tips on how to navigate through a difficult market. • Consider cars with incentives: Manufacturers still offer some incentives, especially for cars that are near the end of their model cycle or are slow sellers. Most of the big auto information companies, including Edmunds.com, TrueCar.Com and kbb.com (Kelley Blue Book)
BUSINESS
May 22, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Attention all car buyers: The era of cut-rate financing, generous cash-back offers and big discounts is coming to an end. With the effects of the earthquake in Japan rippling through the industry and causing shortages, prices are rising for both new and used cars, and fewer models and options will be available come summer, especially for the hybrids and fuel-efficient vehicles that Japan produces. That's prompted many experts to voice something rarely said in the sales-happy auto industry: With consumers facing the toughest market in recent memory, if you can, put off purchases until things sort out, probably early next year.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Rising gas prices have reignited sales of the fuel-sipping Prius hybrid, and dealers are getting more money for the Toyota sedan. There's just one problem — they are starting to run out of cars. Some don't have any in their showrooms for shoppers to drive home. Others say their stock is dwindling quickly. Continuing disruptions caused by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan are rippling across the globe. Toyota Motor Corp. restarted the Prius factory early this week but closed it down again Wednesday to reassess its part supply.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|