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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1988 | SY MONTGOMERY, Sy Montgomery is a free-lance writer in Hancock, N.H. and
It is no accident that World Wildlife Fund's symbol is the adorable giant panda, and that American conservationists' mascot is the handsome bald eagle--instead of the equally endangered pygmy hog-sucking louse, the eyeless crayfish, or the pearly mussel. "It's hard to get people sentimental over a snail or a insect or an isopod," admitted David Klinger, spokesman for the U.S. Department of the Interior's Endangered Species Program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Researchers at Harvard University have created a robot that can change color in seconds, allowing it to blend seamlessly into a background like a chameleon, or stand out so that it is easy to see. It can even glow in the dark, and change its temperature. These are just the latest additions to a family of rubbery, bendable robots first described in a 2011 paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by the Whiteside Group, a Harvard-based research group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | SY MONTGOMERY
18 million years, New Zealand's birds, reptiles and invertebrates have existed in a peaceful paradise of splendid isolation. Because New Zealand's islands broke away from the ancient southern continent, Gondwanaland, before the evolution of mammals, no carnivorous mammals (or crocodiles or poisonous snakes) hid in wait for New Zealand's native wildlife. So evolution has crafted a unique community of flightless birds, huge, conspicuous invertebrates and primitive plants, frogs and snails that are uniquely vulnerable and found nowhere else on Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Zoo is opening a snazzy new home for reptiles and amphibians today, a $14-million condominium complex for Mexican beaded lizards, Rowley's palm vipers, radiated tortoises and other creatures that slither and croak. The LAIR — the acronym for Living Amphibians, Invertebrates and Reptiles — was five years in the making and will be one of just a few reptile houses to open in North America in the last decade. "We've got one of the best in the nation," zoo Director John Lewis said as workers prepared by cleaning display windows, planting feathery ferns, adjusting temperature and humidity controls and using metal hooks to place venomous snakes carefully into their spacious new homes.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Researchers at Harvard University have created a robot that can change color in seconds, allowing it to blend seamlessly into a background like a chameleon, or stand out so that it is easy to see. It can even glow in the dark, and change its temperature. These are just the latest additions to a family of rubbery, bendable robots first described in a 2011 paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by the Whiteside Group, a Harvard-based research group.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people have tried, in their own quixotic ways, to help BP protect wildlife and clean up crude in the Gulf of Mexico after the worst oil disaster in the country's history. There were those who shaved their dogs and sent the hair south for the company to use to soak up the oil. And there were inventors who flew to Louisiana hoping that their cleanup gadgets would catch BP's eye. A Taiwanese billionaire retrofitted a giant tanker to skim oil from the ocean. And then there's Jack Rudloe, who's determined to protect vulnerable and important sea life — and his business — all on his own. Rudloe, 67, wants to save the gulf's mollusks, shrimp, crabs, seahorses and other invertebrates from what he sees as potential extinction.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2005 | Brad Wible, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have discovered a jellyfish-like creature a mile below the ocean's surface that is the first marine invertebrate to use red fluorescent light to lure prey. The researchers, led by Steven Haddock of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, used robotic submarines to capture specimens from depths of 5,200 to 7,500 feet, roughly 50 miles off the Central California coast. The specimens were found to be a previously unknown species of the genus Erenna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Zoo is opening a snazzy new home for reptiles and amphibians today, a $14-million condominium complex for Mexican beaded lizards, Rowley's palm vipers, radiated tortoises and other creatures that slither and croak. The LAIR — the acronym for Living Amphibians, Invertebrates and Reptiles — was five years in the making and will be one of just a few reptile houses to open in North America in the last decade. "We've got one of the best in the nation," zoo Director John Lewis said as workers prepared by cleaning display windows, planting feathery ferns, adjusting temperature and humidity controls and using metal hooks to place venomous snakes carefully into their spacious new homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
CARLSBAD, Calif. - Dreamers have long looked to the Pacific Ocean as the ultimate answer to California's water needs: an inexhaustible, drought-proof reservoir in the state's backyard. In the last decade, proposals for about 20 desalting plants have been discussed up and down the coast. But even with construction about to begin on the nation's largest seawater desalination facility, 35 miles north of San Diego, experts say it is doubtful that dream will ever be fully realized. "While this Poseidon adventure may work out, I don't look for a lot of that," said Henry Vaux Jr., a UC Berkeley professor emeritus of resource economics who contributed to a 2008 National Research Council report on desalination.
SCIENCE
June 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Israeli scientists have discovered an ancient ecosystem in an underground lake, containing eight previously unknown species isolated from the outside world for millions of years. The crustaceans and invertebrates were found last month in a cave near the city of Ramle in central Israel, team leader Amos Frumkin announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of people have tried, in their own quixotic ways, to help BP protect wildlife and clean up crude in the Gulf of Mexico after the worst oil disaster in the country's history. There were those who shaved their dogs and sent the hair south for the company to use to soak up the oil. And there were inventors who flew to Louisiana hoping that their cleanup gadgets would catch BP's eye. A Taiwanese billionaire retrofitted a giant tanker to skim oil from the ocean. And then there's Jack Rudloe, who's determined to protect vulnerable and important sea life — and his business — all on his own. Rudloe, 67, wants to save the gulf's mollusks, shrimp, crabs, seahorses and other invertebrates from what he sees as potential extinction.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2005 | Brad Wible, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have discovered a jellyfish-like creature a mile below the ocean's surface that is the first marine invertebrate to use red fluorescent light to lure prey. The researchers, led by Steven Haddock of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, used robotic submarines to capture specimens from depths of 5,200 to 7,500 feet, roughly 50 miles off the Central California coast. The specimens were found to be a previously unknown species of the genus Erenna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1989 | SY MONTGOMERY
18 million years, New Zealand's birds, reptiles and invertebrates have existed in a peaceful paradise of splendid isolation. Because New Zealand's islands broke away from the ancient southern continent, Gondwanaland, before the evolution of mammals, no carnivorous mammals (or crocodiles or poisonous snakes) hid in wait for New Zealand's native wildlife. So evolution has crafted a unique community of flightless birds, huge, conspicuous invertebrates and primitive plants, frogs and snails that are uniquely vulnerable and found nowhere else on Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1988 | SY MONTGOMERY, Sy Montgomery is a free-lance writer in Hancock, N.H. and
It is no accident that World Wildlife Fund's symbol is the adorable giant panda, and that American conservationists' mascot is the handsome bald eagle--instead of the equally endangered pygmy hog-sucking louse, the eyeless crayfish, or the pearly mussel. "It's hard to get people sentimental over a snail or a insect or an isopod," admitted David Klinger, spokesman for the U.S. Department of the Interior's Endangered Species Program.
OPINION
October 14, 1990
Obviously, Feinstein and Wilson lack the leadership to make hard choices as evidenced by their responses to your Commentary debate issue, "Given $20 Million for Drug Enforcement or Treatment, I'd Choose . . ." (Oct. 8). I, too, will make the easy choices and vote for neither of these invertebrates. DON WILLIAMS South Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2009 | Associated Press
The federal government is giving endangered species protection to the black abalone, a Pacific Coast mollusk that is being pushed to extinction by overfishing, disease and changing ocean conditions. The National Marine Fisheries Service on Tuesday listed the black abalone as an endangered species following a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity. The black abalone was once one of the most common invertebrates on the Southern California coast and Channel Islands.
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