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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | Ann M. Simmons and Garrett Therolf
Long before Ingrid Brewer was charged with torturing her children, one of them told a social worker that she was scared. After visiting Brewer's Palmdale home while assessing her application to adopt the children, the social worker reported that the girl, now 7, and her half brother, 8, appeared stiff in Brewer's presence and had to ask permission to do anything. Despite that report, the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services looked no further and contact with the family was soon terminated.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The NBA said it is conducting an investigation following a report by TMZ late Friday of an audio recording that allegedly captures Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling making racist statements in the course of an argument with a friend. A person identified by TMZ as Sterling can be heard in the recording, said to be made made earlier this month, telling a female friend, identified as V. Stiviano, that he was upset she posted a picture on her Instagram account of herself next to Lakers legend Magic Johnson.
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NEWS
August 14, 1993 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mystery surrounding the bizarre disappearance of the father of Chicago Bulls basketball superstar Michael Jordan was partially solved Friday when a body that had been found floating in a South Carolina creek on Aug. 3 was identified as that of James Jordan. Officials said that the cause of death was a single gunshot wound to the chest. Jordan, 57, had been missing for three weeks and it wasn't until Thursday that the matter became public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Kevin Baxter, Brian Bennett
Yasiel Puig's journey to Los Angeles - and riches with the Dodgers - is a serpentine tale of drug cartels, nighttime escapes and international human smuggling. Yet in the booming marketplace for Cuban ballplayers, it is far from unique. Since 2009, nearly three dozen have defected, with at least 25 of them signing contracts worth more than a combined $315 million. Many, like Puig, were spirited away on speedboats to Mexico, Haiti or the Dominican Republic. Once there, they typically were held by traffickers before being released to agents - for a price.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
There are frequent fliers, and then there are people like Steven Rothstein and Jacques Vroom. Both men bought tickets that gave them unlimited first-class travel for life on American Airlines. It was almost like owning a fleet of private jets. Passes in hand, Rothstein and Vroom flew for business. They flew for pleasure. They flew just because they liked being on planes. They bypassed long lines, booked backup itineraries in case the weather turned, and never worried about cancellation fees.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 120 investigators and prosecutors looking into workers' compensation fraud in Southern California served search warrants Wednesday at 31 sites, including the homes and offices of a string of doctors and lawyers suspected of paying illicit kickbacks. The investigation is one of several major workers' compensation fraud probes launched by authorities in the region since the beginning of last year.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the eager anticipation and lively conversations emanating from the crowd in Anaheim's Marriott Hotel ballroom, it seemed like a rock star was en route. But when a side door opened, controversial TV real estate investment adviser Tom Vu bounded toward the podium. "Hi! You ready to make big money?" Vu, 34, asked as the crowd of about 1,000 people leapt to their feet in applause. "Motivating folks is in my blood. You wanna be rich don't you? Well if you make no money with me, you a loser!"
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government on Wednesday banned the drug Halcion, the world's most widely prescribed sleeping pill. Halcion, and other medicines containing triazolam, have been associated with psychological side effects, particularly memory loss and depression, an announcement from the Department of Health said.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only rarely does a judge in a criminal case overturn the verdict reached by jurors in her own courtroom. Still rarer is the judge who admits to committing an error so serious it taints a verdict. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor did both Friday night in an extraordinary ruling that overturned the convictions of three Rampart Division police officers, impressing legal scholars with both her tightly reasoned legal arguments and her unusual candor.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
A former tutor to two nephews of Robert F. Kennedy testified Tuesday before a grand jury investigating the unsolved 1975 slaying of a 15-year-old girl. When Martha Moxley was killed, Kenneth Littleton was a 23-year-old live-in tutor to the children of Rushton Skakel. Skakel is the brother of Ethel Kennedy, U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's widow. Moxley was beaten to death with a golf club, which police said came from the Skakel house.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver told reporters in Memphis, Tenn., on Saturday evening that racist remarks allegedly made by Clippers owner Donald Sterling were “truly offensive and disturbing” and said the league intended to conduct an investigation into the recording's authenticity that would “move extraordinarily quickly,” possibly concluding in the next few days. Silver would not comment on possible repercussions for Sterling should the league be satisfied it was his voice on the recording.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The former top watchdog for the Homeland Security Department rewrote reports and slowed investigations at the request of senior staff for then-Secretary Janet Napolitano, a review conducted by Senate staff found. Charles K. Edwards, who was acting inspector general for Homeland Security from late 2011 through early 2013, considered aides to Napolitano to be friends, socialized with them over drinks and dinner and, at their urging, improperly made changes to several investigative reports, according to the Senate review released Thursday.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Karin Klein
The most troubling aspect of an internal Los Angeles Unified School District report on its purchase of iPads for its students isn't what it found out, but what it couldn't find out. As Times education writer Howard Blume reported this week, the scoring sheets used to rate different vendors for the district's technology purchase were lost, which hampered the investigation. Without them, the investigators would have had a hard job trying to figure out whether the contract went to the most highly rated contenders for the contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro
The chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee on Thursday pledged to convene a hearing on allegations that excessive wait times at a Phoenix VA facility led to the deaths of 40 veterans. Thousands of veterans have been kept waiting for care, according to a story first reported in the Arizona Republic, and later on CNN, which also said that VA workers in the Phoenix office used two sets of records to keep the long wait times off the official books. "I am troubled when I hear any veteran may have received substandard care from the VA," said the committee chairman, Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont independent.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The latest Albuquerque police officer to fatally shoot a suspect was caught in a lie three years ago during the case of another officer implicated in a deadly shooting, according to an attorney and sworn testimony. In 2011, Officer Jeremy Dear told a police investigator that he saw the suspect, Alan Gomez, holding a cigarette and standing in front of his house talking with police, according to federal court records. Gomez was a suspect in a hostage situation and was considered armed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
The state's political ethics watchdog has opened an investigation into the finances of a political action committee founded by gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly, according to a report published Friday evening by the Sacramento Bee.‎ The California Patriots PAC, designed to promote conservative candidates, has not filed financial disclosure statements since October 2012, according to the Fair Political Practices Commission. Donnelly disputes this, telling the Bee that the reports were filed and new copies were sent to the FPPC on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1993 | PATRICK BOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death of Brandon Lee in a filming incident took a startling turn Thursday when police revealed the actor was killed by what was apparently a .44-caliber bullet. What appeared to be a bullet was discovered lodged near Lee's spine during an autopsy, calling into question the safety procedures on the set of the film. Detectives from the Wilmington Police Department said that they are still treating Lee's death as an accidental shooting. They said that they recovered the .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2008 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
For more than 20 years, I've been writing about local history, and never once has Southern California let me down. I've found no shortage of tycoons and beggars, dreamy spiritualists, mad-eyed killers. This 227-year-old city has had a few angels, but it's the others who often make for the most fascinating storytelling.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The nearly 13-minute 911 call in Denver that ended with the caller dead with a gunshot wound and her husband being taken to jail is being investigated to ensure the civilian dispatcher and responding officers properly handled the situation, police said. The suspected shooter, Richard Kirk, was ordered held without bond by a Denver judge on Wednesday. His wife, Kristine Kirk, reached 911 on Monday night to complain that her husband was hallucinating. She said the behavior was scaring her and their three children, according to a court document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
A California congresswoman announced plans Tuesday to introduce federal legislation to toughen laws against what she called an epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses. In an appearance at UC Berkeley, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) said she would press for more aggressive action against sexual assault with increased funding for federal investigators, annual campus surveys and more comprehensive data on the outcomes of cases. She also said she would seek to require universities to interview students who file complaints of sexual misconduct, addressing widespread concerns about inadequate investigations.
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