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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
HOUSTON - Forget Monticello or the Chrysler building: There may be no piece of architecture more quintessentially American than the Astrodome. Widely copied after it opened in 1965, it perfectly embodies postwar U.S. culture in its brash combination of Space Age glamour, broad-shouldered scale and total climate control. It also offers a key case study in how modern architecture treated the natural world - and how radically the balance of power in that relationship has shifted over the last half-century.
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BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
With BlackBerry's latest upheaval, the troubled company is again facing pressure to ditch its smartphones. In a stunning turn of events, BlackBerry announced Monday that a tentative deal to sell itself to a Canadian financial services holding company for $4.7 billion had collapsed, that it was no longer for sale and that Chief Executive Thorsten Heins was being replaced. Shares of BlackBerry plummeted, closing down $1.27, or 16.4%, to $6.50. Its stock has fallen 45% this year.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | Stuart Pfeifer
The appearance-obsessed can get Botox injections to erase wrinkles, Rogaine to reseed fading hair lines and the prescription medicine Latisse to fill out flimsy eyelashes. Soon, they may be able to get a shot to kill fat. A Southern California company has invested millions of dollars on an injectable, fat-destroying drug that it says will do away with double chins. Kythera Biopharmaceuticals Inc. said the drug, which for now is known by the code name ATX-101, has proved effective at diminishing double chins during trials on more than 1,000 volunteers in the United States and Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
METAIRIE, La. - The strippers were gyrating and the smoke machine was spewing its vaporous mist, but Matthew McConaughey just kept on staring straight ahead. Gaunt and mustachioed, the actor called for another shot of Johnnie Walker - if he meant a prop liquid, the bartender didn't seem to know it - and tightened his facial muscles almost to the breaking point. "Man, if you're up there, you better be listening," McConaughey whispered, candles from the table in front of him flickering shadows on his contorted face as he half-beseeched, half-ordered the heavens.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Digital Domain, the visual-effects company that is co-producing the Lionsgate movie "Ender's Game," invested about $17 million in cash to help produce the much-anticipated movie, two former company executives said. In a highly unusual move, the pioneering visual-effects house -- co-founded by director James Cameron in 1993 -- is co-producing "Ender's Game," which hits theaters on Nov. 1, with OddLot Entertainment and Summit Entertainment. The big-screen adaptation of the popular 1985 book of the same name by Orson Scott Card, is among the most expensive independent movies ever made, with a budget of more than $100 million.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton and Jessica Guynn
Crowdfunding has raised money to build libraries, make movies and send children on school trips. Soon it may let small investors buy stakes in fledgling companies. Federal regulators proposed rules Wednesday that would allow individuals to invest in start-ups over the Internet. The goal is to make it easier for entrepreneurs to raise money and create jobs, while giving small investors an early shot at latching onto the next Apple Inc. or Google Inc. The Securities and Exchange Commission voted unanimously to propose the regulations, which are required as part of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, which was passed by Congress last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Lawrence Klein, the University of Pennsylvania economist who won the 1980 Nobel Prize for his computer-based models that help governments forecast the future and act accordingly, died Sunday at his home in Gladwyne, Pa. He was 93. His family announced his death but did not disclose the cause. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded Klein the 1980 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences "for the creation of econometric models and the application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: Recently my mother passed away. My brother and I were fortunate enough to inherit a substantial amount of money from her life insurance. My brother and I do not want to spend this money and have placed the funds in brokerage accounts. My question is this: Because of the often-volatile market, is there a better way to invest this money? Should we take this money out of the market and save some of it in a bank? Answer: Your first task with a windfall is to determine your goal (or goals)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Evan Halper
California is spending nearly $15 million to build 10 hydrogen fueling stations, even though just 227 hydrogen-powered vehicles exist in the state today. It's a hefty bet on the future, given that government officials have been trying for nine years, with little success, to get automakers to build more hydrogen cars . The project is part of a sprawling but little-known state program that packs a powerful financial punch: It spent $1.6 billion last year on a myriad of energy-efficiency and alternative-energy projects.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | E. Scott Reckard
Five years after Washington bailed out more than 700 banks, the money has become a burden for more than 100 community banks that can't seem to repay it. About a dozen of those are in California, and they are facing increasing pressure as the federal government looks to close out the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP. The banks will soon face a big increase in the annual dividend they must pay the government on its investment - to 9% from 5%. Some of the banks will have to sell out or bring in new shareholders - who might demand control of the institution in exchange for the cash infusion.
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