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BUSINESS
October 5, 2004 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Warner Music Group, the giant music company bought this year by a group led by Edgar Bronfman Jr., said Monday that it would return $350 million to its shareholders. Warner, whose artists include Green Day, Madonna and Linkin Park, said it had extra cash to return to investors as a result of the company's improved balance sheet and lower-than-expected restructuring costs.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Despite rallying stock and bond markets, mutual funds took in less new cash from small investors in March than in February, the funds' chief trade group said Thursday. But this month buyers have returned in greater numbers, many fund companies say. The Investment Company Institute reported Thursday that net new cash flow into stock funds dipped slightly to $7.2 billion in March from $8.6 billion in February. Bond funds, meanwhile, saw a net $3.7 billion flow out in March, up from February's $1.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2005 | From Reuters
Lenovo Group Ltd., the Chinese computer maker that agreed to buy IBM Corp.'s personal computer unit for $1.25 billion, is in advanced talks with several private equity firms to invest in the company, people close to the situation said. Hong Kong-based Lenovo is in talks with Texas Pacific Group, General Atlantic and Newbridge Capital, which plan to put up a total of about $350 million to take a minority stake in Lenovo, the sources said.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2005 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Investors poured a net $177.5 billion into stock mutual funds last year -- the most since 2000 -- with a record amount funneled into funds that buy stakes in foreign companies, a report showed Friday. The Investment Company Institute, a trade group for the fund industry, said in its report that the inflow was the fifth-highest on record. Investors profited by steering more of their money into mutual funds that concentrate on foreign companies. Global funds rose 18.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM
The day after the Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 554 points last October, individual investors plowed a net $684 million into the equity mutual funds through discount broker Charles Schwab & Co. Was there similar heavy buying Wednesday, after Tuesday's market plunge? Schwab officials won't have the official numbers until this morning, but by most indications from the fund industry, the answer is likely to be a resounding no.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1998 | PAUL J. LIM
Last week, when the Standard & Poor's 500 index fell nearly 4%, investors pulled a net $2.7 billion out of domestic stock mutual funds, according to estimates by Trim Tabs Financial Services, a Santa Rosa, Calif., firm that tracks fund flows. But what looks like a big number isn't, relatively speaking. On a percentage basis, that $2.7 billion is a fraction of the net $31.5 billion in cash that Trim Tabs estimates has flowed into domestic equity portfolios in June and July.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Mutual fund manager Mary Lisanti, recruited with great fanfare by Milwaukee-based Strong Funds two years ago, is departing. Lisanti, 41, who manages the $160-million Strong Small Cap fund, will leave for Northstar Investment Management Corp. in Stamford, Conn., where she will oversee six funds and help develop a plan to expand the firm's fund business as chief investment officer of equities. Lisanti, a New York native, said it was her decision to leave Strong.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Investors thinking about how to save or invest a spare dime these days may quickly come to believe they are severely short of decent options. To many people it probably feels too late to buy stocks, with major market indexes up 20% to 30% since mid-March. The blue-chip Standard & Poor's 500 index rose again last week, the ninth advance in 10 weeks. It feels way too early to buy high-quality bonds such as Treasury issues, as yields hover near 45-year lows.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Investors, as usual, read the headlines differently last week. And that's why the stocks of strong, healthy savings and loan companies hit new highs after President Bush unveiled a program for dealing with the industry's troubles. Investors saw the doughnut, not the hole. Though Bush's plan levied higher insurance charges on the savings and loan industry, the promise that sick S&Ls would be weeded out meant brighter prospects for the healthy. And so the stocks of such firms as H. F.
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