Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInvisible College
IN THE NEWS

Invisible College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 19, 2004 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
At the Invisible College, tuition costs $5. Class is in session only twice a month. The eclectic course of study ranges from Moroccan lounge music to conspiracy theory literature, from pioneers of the psychedelic movement to pulp art history. In fact, nothing is strictly academic at this biweekly bohemian salon, where artists and intellectuals, young and old, exchange ideas and laughs. Although there is dancing and drinking, conversation rises above dim bar chatter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2004 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
At the Invisible College, tuition costs $5. Class is in session only twice a month. The eclectic course of study ranges from Moroccan lounge music to conspiracy theory literature, from pioneers of the psychedelic movement to pulp art history. In fact, nothing is strictly academic at this biweekly bohemian salon, where artists and intellectuals, young and old, exchange ideas and laughs. Although there is dancing and drinking, conversation rises above dim bar chatter.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | ROBERT M. ANDREWS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There are no ivy-covered walls or homecoming dances at a popular but largely invisible college the Department of Agriculture has been running quietly here for nearly 70 years. "One of the big jokes I've heard is that our football team has never lost a game," joked Dr. Philip Hudson, director of the USDA Graduate School, the only U.S. government educational institution of its kind. The longstanding affiliation with the Agriculture Department could be misleading.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2003 | Justin Pope, Associated Press
Rich Linnell and Gary Chalmers say their battle for the right to marry is about fairness and money -- and the future of their 11-year-old daughter, Paige. Linnell and Chalmers say they are reminded at every turn that their inability to marry takes a financial toll. For example, there's the extra $3,600 Linnell pays each year because he cannot piggyback, as a spouse could, on the health insurance policy that Chalmers gets as a teacher.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2005 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
When Kimberly Teplitzky and Geoff Aung attended the College Republican National Convention in Arlington, Va., last month, they avoided talking about political issues with their fellow conventioneers. "We didn't want to scare them away," Teplitzky said. Teplitzky and Aung -- who voted for Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) in the 2004 presidential election -- are interns at Campus Progress, a new division of the Center for American Progress, a liberal Washington think tank.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|