Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIowa Agriculture
IN THE NEWS

Iowa Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
But for the satellite dish in the yard, the Harlan Pruess farm looks almost American Gothic perfect. A red-white-and-blue flag waves proudly above a trim green lawn. The family dog sits faithfully outside a neatly whitewashed farmhouse. A stubble of stalks from last year's harvest peeks through rich black soil on rolling fields still moist from overnight rain. Even the dingy yellow corn mound out by the shed, nearly 13,000 bushels worth, seems deceptively bucolic.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | Associated Press
All 260 sheep suspected of having been exposed to a form of "mad cow" disease have been killed, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday. Before the flocks were sent to Iowa, four sheep tested positive for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, or TSE, a disease family that includes bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, and scrapie, a sheep disease that doesn't affect humans.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Vegetarians and animal-rights activists will try to grab the spotlight at the World Pork Expo this week as the industry cheers five years of living high on the hog. The rising voice of the "meat stinks" crowd is a growing cloud over an industry that has been on the mend and attempting to change the image of pork from an artery-clogging food to a lean and nutritious rival of chicken.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Vegetarians and animal-rights activists will try to grab the spotlight at the World Pork Expo this week as the industry cheers five years of living high on the hog. The rising voice of the "meat stinks" crowd is a growing cloud over an industry that has been on the mend and attempting to change the image of pork from an artery-clogging food to a lean and nutritious rival of chicken.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iowa environmental officials said that a federal agency and a grain elevator operator were equally responsible for cleaning up 12,755 bushels of corn heavily tainted by aflatoxin, a natural cancer-causing toxin. The order from the Iowa Division of Environmental Protection gave the Farmers Home Administration and the Pruess Elevator Co. of Lowden, which purchased the corn, until next Friday to remove it.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Offers of food, lodging, money and equipment continued to pour in Wednesday for a group of Iowa farmers who have come to Idaho to cut free hay for their drought-starved livestock. Organizers of the hay harvest had worried there wouldn't be enough machinery to keep the Iowans busy, but offers of equipment began pouring into the Farm Bureau office here Tuesday after a Farm Bureau official appealed on television for donations.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1987 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
Not far from this old industrial city's downtown is a windowless, block-square building, a weathered red-brick plant flanked by empty parking lots and lifeless stockyards. The virtually unused Rath meat packing plant is a sign of the times in Iowa--hard times that have affected residents of most of the state's cities and towns as much as they have its farmers. Iowa has spent virtually all of the 1980s in an economic depression.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A paid hunt for wreckage from the July 19 crash of United Airlines Flight 232 near Sioux City, Iowa, was declared over for the year so that farmers could return to the fields. Fragments of the DC-10 engine's fan blade and bearings were found on the Edward Anderson farm near Alta, Iowa, and the landowners will divide a $1,000 reward with the treasure hunter who found them. General Electric said it had hired searchers from Missouri, Nebraska, Minnesota and Iowa to look for clues to the crash.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | Associated Press
All 260 sheep suspected of having been exposed to a form of "mad cow" disease have been killed, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday. Before the flocks were sent to Iowa, four sheep tested positive for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, or TSE, a disease family that includes bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, and scrapie, a sheep disease that doesn't affect humans.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Postville is pretty much a long way from everywhere, except maybe Waukon and Decorah, and even folks in Iowa will tell you that's not saying a whole lot. So the small crowd waiting Wednesday afternoon at Meyer's 66 Cafe for Dick Gephardt to make a campaign appearance wasn't very surprised when Gephardt's advance man announced that the Democratic presidential candidate was running late. Everybody here knows how hard it is to get to Postville. After all, the interstate is 100 miles away.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers wearing protective "moon suits" and backed up by volunteer firefighters Friday removed 13,000 bushels of what could be the most toxic grain ever tested from an Iowa farm and trucked it to a hazardous waste dump near here. The delicate $90,000 operation took place more than two months after Iowa officials declared the corn--tainted by a mold-induced carcinogen called aflatoxin--a "hazardous material," the same designation reserved for dangerous chemicals and industrial pollutants.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
But for the satellite dish in the yard, the Harlan Pruess farm looks almost American Gothic perfect. A red-white-and-blue flag waves proudly above a trim green lawn. The family dog sits faithfully outside a neatly whitewashed farmhouse. A stubble of stalks from last year's harvest peeks through rich black soil on rolling fields still moist from overnight rain. Even the dingy yellow corn mound out by the shed, nearly 13,000 bushels worth, seems deceptively bucolic.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iowa environmental officials said that a federal agency and a grain elevator operator were equally responsible for cleaning up 12,755 bushels of corn heavily tainted by aflatoxin, a natural cancer-causing toxin. The order from the Iowa Division of Environmental Protection gave the Farmers Home Administration and the Pruess Elevator Co. of Lowden, which purchased the corn, until next Friday to remove it.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A paid hunt for wreckage from the July 19 crash of United Airlines Flight 232 near Sioux City, Iowa, was declared over for the year so that farmers could return to the fields. Fragments of the DC-10 engine's fan blade and bearings were found on the Edward Anderson farm near Alta, Iowa, and the landowners will divide a $1,000 reward with the treasure hunter who found them. General Electric said it had hired searchers from Missouri, Nebraska, Minnesota and Iowa to look for clues to the crash.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Offers of food, lodging, money and equipment continued to pour in Wednesday for a group of Iowa farmers who have come to Idaho to cut free hay for their drought-starved livestock. Organizers of the hay harvest had worried there wouldn't be enough machinery to keep the Iowans busy, but offers of equipment began pouring into the Farm Bureau office here Tuesday after a Farm Bureau official appealed on television for donations.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Last summer, Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis had a problem in Iowa, and his name was Dixon Terry. Terry, an Iowa dairy farmer and founder of the influential Iowa Farm Unity Coalition, did not like what Dukakis was saying about agriculture.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Listen to the Democratic presidential candidates talk about the economy of Iowa, and visions of a broken state rise up before you. The Iowa of their rhetoric is a place where countless bankruptcies and foreclosures still threaten the very survival of the American family farm, a state where factory jobs have become so scarce that legions of unemployed leave for the Sun Belt each month.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Last summer, Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis had a problem in Iowa, and his name was Dixon Terry. Terry, an Iowa dairy farmer and founder of the influential Iowa Farm Unity Coalition, did not like what Dukakis was saying about agriculture.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Postville is pretty much a long way from everywhere, except maybe Waukon and Decorah, and even folks in Iowa will tell you that's not saying a whole lot. So the small crowd waiting Wednesday afternoon at Meyer's 66 Cafe for Dick Gephardt to make a campaign appearance wasn't very surprised when Gephardt's advance man announced that the Democratic presidential candidate was running late. Everybody here knows how hard it is to get to Postville. After all, the interstate is 100 miles away.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Listen to the Democratic presidential candidates talk about the economy of Iowa, and visions of a broken state rise up before you. The Iowa of their rhetoric is a place where countless bankruptcies and foreclosures still threaten the very survival of the American family farm, a state where factory jobs have become so scarce that legions of unemployed leave for the Sun Belt each month.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|