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NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Maeve Reston
Who won the Iowa caucuses? It turns out we may never know for sure. More than two weeks after Mitt Romney claimed an initial eight-vote victory, the Iowa Republican Party is set to announce that a revised tally puts Rick Santorum ahead by 34 votes, the Des Moines Register reported. However, results from eight of the 1,774 precincts "are missing," the paper said, leaving Iowa Republicans in the position of having to declare an inconclusive result. "It's a split decision," Chad Olsen, the Iowa Republican Party executive director, told the paper.
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NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Maeve Reston
Who won the Iowa caucuses? It turns out we may never know for sure. More than two weeks after Mitt Romney claimed an initial eight-vote victory, the Iowa Republican Party is set to announce that a revised tally puts Rick Santorum ahead by 34 votes, the Des Moines Register reported. However, results from eight of the 1,774 precincts "are missing," the paper said, leaving Iowa Republicans in the position of having to declare an inconclusive result. "It's a split decision," Chad Olsen, the Iowa Republican Party executive director, told the paper.
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NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The outcome of Tuesday's Iowa caucuses was thrown into question Thursday after reports of a discrepancy in the vote count in one rural precinct that could swing the result in Rick Santorum's favor. It wasn't until well after midnight Wednesday morning that the Iowa Republican Party announced that Mitt Romney had won the narrowest of victories over Santorum -- just eight votes out of more than 120,000 cast in the statewide GOP gatherings.  State party chairman Matt Strawn noted at the time that a certified tally would not come for two more weeks.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
One of the great things about the Iowa caucuses is the event's quirky Hey, kids, let's put on a show quality. Candidates do indeed still shag voter questions in intimate settings, addressing audiences of a dozen or fewer after navigating to the front  around tables laden with home-baked cookies and Jell-O salad. (At least that's the case for minor candidates before they become major; see Santorum, Rick.)  But the downside of what amounts to an amateur production surfaced in the last 24 hours with reports calling into question Mitt Romney's astonishingly thin eight-vote victory Tuesday night.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Mitt Romney will not participate in the Iowa straw poll this summer, a possible sign that he will not make a full-fledged effort to win that state's leadoff nominating contests in 2012. In a statement issued Thursday evening, Romney's campaign said it had decided not to participate in any straw polls, "whether it's in Florida, Iowa, Michigan or someplace else. " But Iowa's Ames straw poll, scheduled for August, is far and away the most important, particularly to activists who will have the first say in helping choose the Republican nominee.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Iowa voters will kick off the 2012 presidential campaign when they gather Tuesday night at churches, schools, libraries and homes to decide their preferences for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations. For Democrats, the process will be simple since President Obama is the party's de facto nominee. Republicans, however, will be asked to choose between one of nine candidates. Here's how the GOP's Iowa caucus process will work: Beginning at 8 p.m. Eastern time, caucus-goers will assemble at hundreds of locations across the state.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Sarah Palin is crashing the party again. Just as the announced Republican candidates descend on Ames, Iowa, for the straw poll and another prepares to throw his cowboy hat into the ring, the former Alaska governor has decided to resume her "One Nation" bus tour with a stop this week at the Iowa State Fair. "The heartland is perfect territory for more of the One Nation Tour as we put forth efforts to revitalize the fundamental restoration of America by highlighting our nation's heart, history, and founding principles," an announcement on the website of Palin's political action committee says.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It's an unsettling time for Iowa Democrats, who spent 2008 basking in the glow of having given Barack Obama his first major victory on the road to the White House. Since then, their one-term Democratic governor, Chet Culver, was defeated in November, and three Supreme Court justices were booted off the bench over a decision favoring same-sex marriage. "After all the euphoria of '8, '10 was such a rude awakening," said Iowa Democratic Party Chairwoman Sue Dvorsky, a chipper former special education teacher who refers to years by only their last digits.
OPINION
August 27, 2011
Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul nearly tied Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann in a widely covered Iowa straw poll this month, so he should be considered a front-runner to face President Obama in 2012, right? It isn't that simple. Last week, Opinion contributor Ronald Brownstein wrote that Bachmann, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney are, at this point, the front-runners. The article prompted reader William A. Christer of West Hollywood to ask why Brownstein "failed to mention the second-place winner in the Iowa straw poll — Ron Paul"?
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The first Republican debate lacked the party's biggest names. The second lacked any major fireworks. Now, as the GOP's announced presidential hopefuls meet again for a debate in Iowa on Thursday, arguably all but one of the candidates are in search of a dynamic-shifting moment as the nominating race enters a decisive phase. For Mitt Romney, Thursday offered more evidence of his front-runner status. The leader in national polling and fundraising, he sparred with liberal activists as he toured the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, focused more on the current president than his GOP rivals.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The outcome of Tuesday's Iowa caucuses was thrown into question Thursday after reports of a discrepancy in the vote count in one rural precinct that could swing the result in Rick Santorum's favor. It wasn't until well after midnight Wednesday morning that the Iowa Republican Party announced that Mitt Romney had won the narrowest of victories over Santorum -- just eight votes out of more than 120,000 cast in the statewide GOP gatherings.  State party chairman Matt Strawn noted at the time that a certified tally would not come for two more weeks.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Iowa voters will kick off the 2012 presidential campaign when they gather Tuesday night at churches, schools, libraries and homes to decide their preferences for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations. For Democrats, the process will be simple since President Obama is the party's de facto nominee. Republicans, however, will be asked to choose between one of nine candidates. Here's how the GOP's Iowa caucus process will work: Beginning at 8 p.m. Eastern time, caucus-goers will assemble at hundreds of locations across the state.
OPINION
August 27, 2011
Republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul nearly tied Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann in a widely covered Iowa straw poll this month, so he should be considered a front-runner to face President Obama in 2012, right? It isn't that simple. Last week, Opinion contributor Ronald Brownstein wrote that Bachmann, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney are, at this point, the front-runners. The article prompted reader William A. Christer of West Hollywood to ask why Brownstein "failed to mention the second-place winner in the Iowa straw poll — Ron Paul"?
NATIONAL
August 13, 2011 | By Paul West, Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
On a day that Michele Bachmann scored an early victory in Iowa, Rick Perry scrambled the Republican presidential race by jumping in with a "tea-party"-themed attack on Washington and what he termed President Obama's "rudderless leadership. " Perry's announcement Saturday stepped on Bachmann's triumph in the Ames straw poll, the biggest moment yet in her presidential campaign and a further sign of her appeal in this early-voting state. "It's your victory! You did it!" Bachmann told supporters crowded outside her bus on the Iowa State University campus, the scene of the daylong GOP event.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The first Republican debate lacked the party's biggest names. The second lacked any major fireworks. Now, as the GOP's announced presidential hopefuls meet again for a debate in Iowa on Thursday, arguably all but one of the candidates are in search of a dynamic-shifting moment as the nominating race enters a decisive phase. For Mitt Romney, Thursday offered more evidence of his front-runner status. The leader in national polling and fundraising, he sparred with liberal activists as he toured the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, focused more on the current president than his GOP rivals.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
The news landed with a thud this week. Not a single candidate had hired Hickory Park, the Ames barbecue institution, to provide food for Saturday's Republican presidential straw poll. "That is crazy," said Shane Vander Hart, editor of the political blog Caffeinated Thoughts. "I am assuming that is a mistake on the part of the campaigns. " Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty is bringing in barbecue from Minnesota-based Famous Dave's — "but that's just wrong," Vander Hart said.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2009 | Johanna Neuman
It seems early to be talking about the 2012 presidential election -- after all, we haven't even had the 2010 congressional one -- but this is Iowa we're talking about. You know, first in the nation, caucus state, informed voters. So more than a few political commentators took notice Wednesday when Iowa Republicans announced that Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty will be the headline speaker at the "Leadership for Iowa" event at the State Fairgrounds in Des Moines on Nov. 7, where he will share the stage with Republican candidates for governor.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The National Rifle Assn.'s second-ranking officer boasted at a closed meeting of NRA members earlier this year that if Republican nominee George W. Bush wins in November, "we'll have . . . a president where we work out of their office." First Vice President Kayne Robinson added that the NRA enjoys "unbelievably friendly relations" with the Texas governor. Robinson, who is also chairman of the Iowa Republican Party, made the comments Feb. 17 before 300 members in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Sarah Palin is crashing the party again. Just as the announced Republican candidates descend on Ames, Iowa, for the straw poll and another prepares to throw his cowboy hat into the ring, the former Alaska governor has decided to resume her "One Nation" bus tour with a stop this week at the Iowa State Fair. "The heartland is perfect territory for more of the One Nation Tour as we put forth efforts to revitalize the fundamental restoration of America by highlighting our nation's heart, history, and founding principles," an announcement on the website of Palin's political action committee says.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It's an unsettling time for Iowa Democrats, who spent 2008 basking in the glow of having given Barack Obama his first major victory on the road to the White House. Since then, their one-term Democratic governor, Chet Culver, was defeated in November, and three Supreme Court justices were booted off the bench over a decision favoring same-sex marriage. "After all the euphoria of '8, '10 was such a rude awakening," said Iowa Democratic Party Chairwoman Sue Dvorsky, a chipper former special education teacher who refers to years by only their last digits.
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