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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
The battleship Iowa, scene of a horrific explosion that killed 47 sailors, and the battleship New Jersey, whose home port is Long Beach, top the Navy's "mothball" list in its plans to retire two of four battleships next year, Defense Department officials said Wednesday. The proposal to mothball two battleships, submitted to President Bush for the fiscal 1991 budget he will present to Congress on Jan. 29, would halve the number of the heavily armored World War II-era ships.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2006 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Turning a battleship around is never easy -- especially in the politically roiled waters of the San Francisco Bay. Last July, San Francisco's county supervisors voted 8 to 3 against bringing the vintage World War II battleship Iowa to San Francisco as a permanent tourist attraction. Some opponents said they were taking a stand against both the war in Iraq and a military that boots out gays and lesbians, a powerful faction in local politics.
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NEWS
September 9, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
It is a tradition as old as sailing ships and as uncompromising as the sea itself: Skippers are held accountable for what happens on their watch. And, whether they are sleeping in their staterooms or issuing orders on the bridge, everything that happens while they are at sea happens on their watch. The U.S. Navy, its traditions tempered by 20th-Century concepts of justice, has devised gradations of punishment and provided the accused with legal counsel and avenues of appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bidding for the World War II battleship Iowa has been opened to any California community willing to give it a permanent home. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Rep. Richard W. Pombo (R-Tracy) agreed to open bidding for the ship to any California town or city. The Iowa is now moored in Suisun Bay, about 30 miles northeast of San Francisco. Pombo had previously supported donating the 63-year-old ship to the Port of Stockton.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | From United Press International
The Navy took punitive disciplinary action Wednesday against two officers of the battleship Iowa for deficiencies found after an explosion that killed 47 men. It also admonished the captain and operations officer. All four, charged with dereliction of duty, went before an admiral's mast, a non-judicial form of inquiry, for lax procedures found during the Navy's investigation into the ship's gun blast April 19.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Scientists may never be able to prove whether the 1989 explosion aboard the battleship Iowa was accidental or an act of sabotage, congressional investigators said Wednesday. The investigators for the first time gave the statistical probability that the explosion was an accident: perhaps one chance in 16. In its initial investigation, the Navy concluded that the explosion "most probably" was set off intentionally by Gunner's Mate Clayton M.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Navy is prepared to apologize for saying that a lone sailor could have caused the April, 1989, blast that claimed 47 lives aboard the battleship Iowa, Pentagon sources said Wednesday. Adm. Frank B. Kelso, the chief of naval operations, is expected to make the announcement at a Pentagon briefing today, based on a new report on the huge explosion that ripped through a gun turret aboard the vessel.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From United Press International
The battleship Iowa sailed into its home port Thursday, greeted by cheers from friends and relatives of the sailors after the battleship's first major deployment since an April explosion killed 47 crew members. "The big stick is back," said Capt. Fred P. Moosally, the Iowa's commanding officer, referring to the World War II-era dreadnought. The ship and its crew of 1,500, completing an accident-free six-month deployment to the Mediterranean Sea, slid into its berth at the Norfolk Naval Station.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | United Press International
The U.S. battleship Iowa, damaged earlier this year by an explosion that killed 47 sailors, will return to the Norfolk Naval Station on Thursday, the Navy announced. The ship, returning from a six-month deployment in the Mediterranean Sea, is to arrive only days before scheduled congressional hearings into the April 19 explosion. A Senate Armed Services subcommittee will take testimony from Capt. Fred P. Moosally, the commanding officer. A House panel also will conduct hearings.
NEWS
September 6, 1989
The Navy's long-awaited report into the battleship Iowa explosion that claimed 47 lives will point to the "probability" that human intervention may have touched off the explosion, but will not cite a specific reason for the blast, defense officials said. Top Navy officials plan to formally release their report Thursday. It culminates a more than four-month investigation into the April 19 tragedy, when powder exploded in the battleship's No.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Navy returned to San Francisco in a big way Saturday. The Iowa, one of the nation's four largest battleships, docked in Suisun Bay opposite Benicia. The occasion marked the first time the huge ship has returned to Bay Area waters in nearly half a century--and many of the ship's former crew members were on hand to welcome it home. John Lapotasky, former president of the USS Iowa Veterans Assn., began his long relationship with the Iowa at age 17.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after it laid the blame for a fatal shipboard explosion on one sailor, the U.S. Navy concluded Thursday that it does not know what caused the April, 1989, blast aboard the battleship Iowa and apologized to the family of the dead serviceman. Adm. Frank Kelso, the chief of naval operations, announced that, "after reviewing all evidence" in the Navy's reopened investigation of the explosion in one of the ship's 16-inch-gun turrets, "the exact cause cannot be determined."
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Navy is prepared to apologize for saying that a lone sailor could have caused the April, 1989, blast that claimed 47 lives aboard the battleship Iowa, Pentagon sources said Wednesday. Adm. Frank B. Kelso, the chief of naval operations, is expected to make the announcement at a Pentagon briefing today, based on a new report on the huge explosion that ripped through a gun turret aboard the vessel.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Scientists may never be able to prove whether the 1989 explosion aboard the battleship Iowa was accidental or an act of sabotage, congressional investigators said Wednesday. The investigators for the first time gave the statistical probability that the explosion was an accident: perhaps one chance in 16. In its initial investigation, the Navy concluded that the explosion "most probably" was set off intentionally by Gunner's Mate Clayton M.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy, having completed new tests to determine the cause of a 1989 explosion on the battleship Iowa, is reassessing its conclusion that one sailor--depressed over the loss of a friendship--masterminded the blast that killed 47 of his shipmates, defense officials said Thursday. "There is a small probability it (the explosion) could have been accidental," a Navy official said Thursday.
NEWS
March 2, 1991
The Pennsylvania town of Greensburg has FACED MORE THAN ITS SHARE OF TRAGEDY. This week, the Iraqi Scud attack on a military barracks in Saudi Arabia left 13 members of a local Army Reserve unit dead. In 1988, three residents of the area were killed when Pan Am Flight 103 blew up over Lockerbie, Scotland. Three district soldiers died the following year when a gun turret exploded on the battleship Iowa. And in 1985, the crash in Newfoundland of a chartered plane bringing U.S.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | United Press International
The Navy decommissioned the battleship Iowa on Friday, retiring the World War II-era ship that became a casualty of Pentagon budget cuts after an April, 1989, gun turret explosion that killed 47 crewmen. The Iowa, decommissioned for the third time, is being mothballed six years after a $348.7-million renovation returned it to active duty. Also being retired is the battleship New Jersey, based in Long Beach, Calif. It is slated to be taken out of service in February.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | From United Press International
President Bush said Monday he is awaiting a report on the reopened investigation into the explosion last year aboard the battleship Iowa, and that if Clayton M. Hartwig is shown to be innocent of any blame, the dead seaman deserves an apology. Bush said he cannot reach any conclusions until he sees all the facts, but he said: "Clearly, I'm interested." It was his first comment on the matter since investigators reported new evidence to Congress on Friday.
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