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OPINION
January 1, 2008
Re "In Iowa cornfields, a left-tilting tradition," Dec. 30 The Times brings to light, at long last, the rich history of Iowa's progressive politics. Too often it goes unnoticed or overlooked by the modern progressive movement that much of my native state was established by a strong lot of liberal-leaning Norwegian, German and Irish settlers. Each group came with a sense not only of hard work but the value of human dignity and a healthy respect for a need to maintain our role as our brother's keeper in both times of hardship and riches.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
If you're blind and living in Iowa, you can't get a driver's license -- but you might be able to get a gun. An interesting report in the Des Moines Register over the weekend delved into an unusual gray area in the state's gun policies, which have allowed some blind residents to get concealed-carry permits. Under state law, Iowans must file applications with their local sheriff's department to get licenses for acquiring handguns and for carrying weapons in public. The permit to carry weapons requires a handgun-training course -- which can be completed online, the Register reports, allowing blind Iowans leeway to legally carry without passing a shooting test.
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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Michael Finnegan
Texas Gov. Rick Perry opened an Iowa campaign swing tonight by ramping up his attacks on Republican presidential rival Mitt Romney's record as Massachusetts governor, calling his "misguided health mandates" a burden to taxpayers nationwide. "It's cost taxpayers in Iowa and across this country nearly $4 billion in Medicaid and Medicare costs," Perry told a few hundred party faithful at a roast-beef-and-mashed-potatoes dinner in Greene County.  "This isn't just about the state of Massachusetts and the cost to them directly.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The gift bag for politicians who stopped by to chat up Iowa delegates this week included a lapel pin, stationery with a drawing of the state's iconic gold-domed Capitol - and a fold-up map of Iowa's 99 counties, a nod to the fact that the race for the 2016 presidential campaign has begun. The main purpose of the Democratic National Convention was the renomination of President Obama, but outside the convention hall, candidates eyeing the open Democratic primary in 2016 wooed party activists and showered attention on the states that hold the early voting contests.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The gift bag for politicians who stopped by to chat up Iowa delegates this week included a lapel pin, stationery with a drawing of the state's iconic gold-domed Capitol - and a fold-up map of Iowa's 99 counties, a nod to the fact that the race for the 2016 presidential campaign has begun. The main purpose of the Democratic National Convention was the renomination of President Obama, but outside the convention hall, candidates eyeing the open Democratic primary in 2016 wooed party activists and showered attention on the states that hold the early voting contests.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | SONNI EFRON
A criminal investigation of Newport Beach investment adviser Steven D. Wymer appeared to be developing Monday as prosecutors from the U.S. attorney's office in Iowa headed to Los Angeles to share information on an alleged multimillion-dollar fraud. In a civil suit filed last week, the Securities and Exchange Commission has charged Wymer with fraud in the alleged disappearance of $75.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2004 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
For 60 years, the Iowa Poll has been sounding out residents of this heartland state on the critical issues of the day. Is the president managing the economy well? Should the governor allow more casinos to be built? And -- tell the truth now, please -- how many of you really like corndogs? Founded in the days when getting a representative sample meant interviewing people with different types of cars in their driveways, the Iowa Poll is the longest-running scientific state survey in the nation.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga and Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writers
It's not often you see a presidential candidate stumped on the stump. But there was Sen. Barack Obama, fielding questions in yet another rural high school, when an Iowan stood up to ask about something that weighed on her mind: "What does your logo stand for?" "Oh, that logo, that's easy," the senator from Illinois began, turning to ponder the O-shaped symbol with the red-and-white stripes across the bottom. "This is . . . " A pause. "Well, first of all, I didn't really design it.
SPORTS
December 8, 1990
Hey, Mike, do you realize there are Iowans who read your column? Your Rose Bowl-bound Iowa-bashing is sickening. Have you ever been to Iowa? Have you ever watched Hayden Fry coach? Did you know that Fry has taken Iowa to a bowl game in eight of the last nine years? Be careful what you say in the paper at Rose Bowl time. There will be more Iowans out here than you can run from. JAY R. JAMISON Ventura
SPORTS
January 11, 1986
Unfortunately, Jim Murray chose not to deal with the game in his article, but with the people of Iowa. Mr. Murray did not see the Iowans I saw. These people forgot the economic troubles that have gripped their businesses and farms to enjoy a football game and a little warm weather. Who could blame them? An Iowan is like a willow tree in the wind. The harder the wind blows the more they bend and the harder they snap back. On January 2, Jim Murray blew too hard. Watch out when those Iowans snap back.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2012 | By Maeve Reston and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
DES MOINES - Returning to the state that launched Barack Obama to the presidency, Mitt Romney on Tuesday accused his rival of carelessly driving the country into "a financial crisis of both debt and spending that threaten what it means to be an American. " The presumptive GOP nominee's stop in the Hawkeye State, which he largely ignored before its first-in-the-nation caucuses in January, reflected the importance Iowa will play in selecting the next president. Though there has been little recent public polling in Iowa, both sides clearly see a competitive race here - made clear by the fact that Romney's visit came three days after one by the vice president's wife, Jill Biden.
OPINION
January 6, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
A mere week ago, the Rick Santorum boom seemed a distant possibility. In a Des Moines Register poll published the weekend before the Iowa caucuses, 41% of respondents said they weren't sure whom they were going to support. And these were people who expressed an intention to attend a caucus. Some of them had inclinations, certainly. But, like diners poring over the menu at a fancy restaurant, they might yet change their minds. Indeed, if the polls are to be believed, many Iowa voters changed their preferences multiple times over the last few months.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
As a U.S. senator who ascended quickly into a leadership position, Rick Santorum was known for his sharp elbows, sharp rhetoric and partisan fighting style. He said gay marriage could lead to bestiality. He blamed "radical feminism" for women going to work at the expense of children. He compared women seeking abortions unfavorably to slaveholders, saying that even they "did not have the unlimited right" to kill their slaves. It was a manner that eventually wore thin on Pennsylvania voters, who turned him out of office in 2006 with a resounding 18-point loss.
NATIONAL
January 4, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
The sound system hissed and spit so loudly they finally had to turn it off. This meant the attorney general of Texas had to yell from his wheelchair. Newt Gingrich's daughter had to cup her hands to her mouth and shout. Mitt Romney's second son, cool like his father, effortlessly projected his voice. It was an Iowa caucus, a messy, delightful, maddening exercise of democracy that takes place simultaneously every four years in churches, schools and living rooms across the state.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Mitt Romney kicked off caucus day without the usual obligatory appeal urging Iowans to support him when Iowa holds the first presidential contest in the nation. Instead, he continued to act as the presumptive nominee and sharply criticized President Obama on Tuesday, saying he has failed to deliver much of what he campaigned on, from righting the nation's economy to dealing with Iran's efforts to acquire a nuclear weapon. “There's a huge gap between the promise and the delivery, the promise and the performance,” Romney said, speaking to a few dozen voters and a crush of media at the Temple of Performing Arts.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
For a time, he flashed like lightning across Iowa, grabbing the lead in the Republican presidential race and electrifying voters with his ideas and scrappiness. But on Monday, Newt Gingrich was just another bottom-tier candidate struggling to survive the ruthless culling of Tuesday's caucuses. They say there are three tickets out of Iowa, though that is probably generous. Even so, Gingrich will be lucky to claim even one of them. The former House speaker has been buried under a toxic waste dump of negative advertising, financed in good part by his chief rival, Mitt Romney, and backers of the former Massachusetts governor.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
If you're blind and living in Iowa, you can't get a driver's license -- but you might be able to get a gun. An interesting report in the Des Moines Register over the weekend delved into an unusual gray area in the state's gun policies, which have allowed some blind residents to get concealed-carry permits. Under state law, Iowans must file applications with their local sheriff's department to get licenses for acquiring handguns and for carrying weapons in public. The permit to carry weapons requires a handgun-training course -- which can be completed online, the Register reports, allowing blind Iowans leeway to legally carry without passing a shooting test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1987 | John Balzar, John Balzar is a Times Political Writer assigned half-time to Iowa during the primary election campaign.
Move around and Los Angeles shows itself to be such a profusion of different places, ordeals and pleasures. You can get the blurry-eyed shaken-up vista from over in Whittier; or you can look down on it, literally and snob-wise, from the show business estates up on Mulholland. You can join two million countrymen on the beach, or escape them in the canyons. You can walk four blocks from stores where $100 will not even buy you a necktie to others where $100 will clothe your entire family.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2011 | By Seema Mehta and Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Republicans battling for their party's presidential nomination scrambled across Iowa lobbing attacks Wednesday in a free-for-all that captured the rapidly shifting dynamics of the race. Six days before Iowans start casting ballots, the rising momentum of Ron Paul led Mitt Romney to take a swipe at the Houston congressman, though not by name, for refusing to advocate a tough policy toward Iran's nuclear program. "The greatest threat that Israel faces, and frankly the greatest threat the world faces, is a nuclear Iran," Romney told Iowans packed into Elly's Tea & Coffee House in Muscatine.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By Paul West
Returning to Iowa, where polls show him contending for first place in next week's caucuses, Ron Paul studiously ignored a barrage of news media questions Wednesday about fresh attacks from rivals Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich, including over incendiary newsletters published under his name in the 1990s. The 76-year-old candidate was trailed by a throng of reporters pressing him for a response to Gingrich's latest attack in a TV interview Tuesday, which described Paul as too extreme to merit his vote were he to become the GOP nominee, and Romney's swipe at Paul's refusal to advocate a tough policy toward Iran's nuclear program.
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