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OPINION
November 22, 2013
Re "Hidden costs in iPad program," Nov. 20 The Los Angeles Unified School District's effort to give an Apple iPad to each student is a noble idea gone horribly wrong in its implementation. The latest snafu is the revelation that the educational software on those iPads will have to be renewed annually after the first three years, costing $60 million a year. The confidence-destroying shame of this, in my view, is that the clock is already running on the three years despite the fact that the software is still a work in progress, not all the iPads have been distributed and administrators evidently hid the information about these costs from the school board and the public.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
The new iPad mini with Retina display is still quite hard to find and generally only available through Apple's online store.  However, in a sign that the rollout of the product may be expanding in time for the Black Friday holiday shopping frenzy, an analyst reports that the device can now be found for purchase in some New York City Apple stores.  Need a laugh? Let this website come up with your next Facebook status "Three weeks after the iPad Air became available at Apple Retail Stores, the iPad mini with Retina Display has made its way to a few Apple Retail Stores in NYC for walk-in customers, possibly portending a wider rollout in the U.S. and around the world over the next week," wrote Cantor Fitzgerald analyst Brian White in a note to clients Friday.  Even before Apple unveiled the new version of the iPad mini with the higher-resolution display last month, analysts had expected it would be in short supply this holiday season.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Karin Klein
The Los Angeles Unified School District has done the public, itself and, most of all, its students a grave disservice with the changing costs and information disseminated about the project to provide every pupil with an iPad. The loss of faith has been tremendous and might hurt the entire project in major ways. That would be a shame. For all the people who decry the district's intentions of making a big technology purchase, the students of L.A. Unified need regular access to computer devices, whether desktops, laptops or tablets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013
This post has been corrected. Join Times staff writer Howard Blume at 9 a.m. for another installment of our ongoing L.A. Now Live discussions about the rollout of iPads at Los Angeles Unified. In his  latest article , Blume reported that, contradicting earlier claims, Los Angeles school district officials said Tuesday that their right to use English and math curricula installed on district iPads expires after three years. At market rates, buying a new license for the curricula would cost $50 to $100 each year per  iPad , an additional cost that could surpass $60 million annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Howard Blume
A committee that oversees school bond spending has rejected major portions of a proposal to expand the use of iPads in the Los Angeles Unified School District. District officials had sought approval from the panel for $135 million in spending. Instead, the committee on Wednesday authorized $45 million. The panel failed to approve plans to provide iPads to all teachers and school administrators. And, it reduced the number of iPads requested for students. The decision creates new complications in the $1-billion effort to provide tablets to every student and teacher in the nation's second-largest school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Howard Blume
A committee that oversees school bond spending has rejected major portions of a proposal to expand the use of iPads in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Officials had sought the panel's approval for $135 million in spending. Instead, the committee Wednesday authorized $45 million. The panel failed to approve plans to provide iPads to all teachers and school administrators. And it reduced the number of iPads requested for students. The decision creates new complications in the $1-billion effort to provide tablets to every student and teacher in the nation's second-largest school system.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
One thing about cautionary tales -- the cautions just seem to proliferate as time marches on. That certainly seems to be the case with the Los Angeles Unified School District's increasingly fraught involvement with education by iPad. In the latest development documented by my indefatigable colleagues Howard Blume and Stephen Ceasar, it turns out that the district costs for the software on its thousands of student-friendly tablets could be $60 million a year higher than anticipated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Top Los Angeles school officials hope to spend $135 million in the spring semester for the next portion of the iPad rollout, according to the official price estimate that emerged this week as part of a revised, compromise plan. That compromise was characterized as a slowdown of the $1-billion effort to provide iPads to every student and teacher in the nation's second-largest school system. But the pace would not be slow compared to the first phase of the distribution this fall. Providing iPads to the first group of 47 schools cost about $50 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Blume and Stephen Ceasar
Contradicting earlier claims, Los Angeles school district officials said Tuesday that their right to use English and math curriculum installed on district iPads expires after three years. At market rates, buying a new license for the curriculum would cost $50 to $100 each year per iPad, an additional cost that could surpass $60 million annually. The expense would add to the price tag of the $1-billion effort to provide a tablet to every teacher and student in the nation's second-largest school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar and Howard Blume
More than a dozen Los Angeles teachers on Tuesday staged their first protest of a $1-billion plan to provide iPads to every student and teacher, calling the effort misguided and unsustainable. About 15 teachers, parents and representatives from the teachers union rallied at the Valley Academy of Arts and Sciences in Granada Hills, just before a meeting held by Los Angeles Board of Education member Tamar Galatzan where L.A. Unified officials explained and defended the iPad rollout.
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